Blood Root | Health Dictionary

Sanguinaria canadensis. N.O. Papaveraceae.

Habitat: Widely distributed throughout North America.

Features ? Root reddish-brown, wrinkled lengthwise, about half-inch thick. Fracture short. Section whitish, with many small, red resin cells which sometimes suffuse the whole. Heavy odour, bitter and harsh to the taste.

Part used ? Root.

Action: Stimulant, tonic, expectorant.

Pulmonary complaints and bronchitis. Should be administered in whooping-cough and croup until emesis occurs. The powdered root is used as a snuff in nasal catarrh, and externally in ringworm and other skin eruptions. The American Thomsonians use it in the treatment of adenoids. Dose, 10 to 20 grains of the powdered root.


Blood Root | Health Dictionary

Keywords of this word: Blood Root


ABO BLOOD GROUPS

Medical Dictionary

See BLOOD GROUPS.... Medical Dictionary

ADAM & EVE ROOTS

Love, Happiness...

AGUE ROOT

Protection...

ARROWROOT

Medicinal Plants

Maranta and Sagittaria species

Description: The arrowroot is an aquatic plant with arrow-shaped leaves and potatolike tubers in the mud.

Habitat and Distribution: Arrowroot is found worldwide in temperate zones and the tropics. It is found in moist to wet habitats.

Edible Parts: The rootstock is a rich source of high quality starch. Boil the rootstock and eat it as a vegetable.... Medicinal Plants

AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD TRANSFUSION

Medical Dictionary

See TRANSFUSION – Transfusion of blood.... Medical Dictionary

BITTER ROOT

Herbal Manual

Apocynum androsaemifolium. N.O. Asclepiadaceae.

Synonym: Dogsbane, Milkweed. Habitat: Indigenous to North America.

Features ? Root is nearly three-quarters of an inch thick, light brown, transversely- wrinkled bark, easily parting from white, woody centre ; groups of stone cells in outer bark. Whole plant gives a gelatinous, milky juice when wounded.

Part used ? Root.

Action: Cathartic, diuretic, detergent, emetic, tonic.

2-5 grains thrice daily as a general tonic, useful in dyspepsia. 5-15 grain doses in cardiac dropsy. Has been recommended in the treatment of Bright's disease. Large doses cause vomiting. Tendency to gripe can be eliminated by adding Peppermint, Calamus or other carminative.... Herbal Manual

BLOOD

Medical Dictionary

Blood consists of cellular components suspended in plasma. It circulates through the blood vessels, carrying oxygen and nutrients to the organs and removing carbon dioxide and other waste products for excretion. In addition, it is the vehicle by which hormones and other humoral transmitters reach their sites of action.

Composition The cellular components are red cells or corpuscles (ERYTHROCYTES), white cells (LEUCOCYTES and lymphocytes – see LYMPHOCYTE), and platelets.

The red cells are biconcave discs with a diameter of 7.5µm. They contain haemoglobin

– an iron-containing porphyrin compound, which takes up oxygen in the lungs and releases it to the tissue.

The white cells are of various types, named according to their appearance. They can leave the circulation to wander through the tissues. They are involved in combating infection, wound healing, and rejection of foreign bodies. Pus consists of the bodies of dead white cells.

Platelets are the smallest cellular components and play an important role in blood clotting (see COAGULATION).

Erythrocytes are produced by the bone marrow in adults and have a life span of about 120 days. White cells are produced by the bone

marrow and lymphoid tissue. Plasma consists of water, ELECTROLYTES and plasma proteins; it comprises 48–58 per cent of blood volume. Plasma proteins are produced mainly by the liver and by certain types of white cells. Blood volume and electrolyte composition are closely regulated by complex mechanisms involving the KIDNEYS, ADRENAL GLANDS and HYPOTHALAMUS.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD BANK

Medical Dictionary

A department in which blood products are prepared, stored, and tested prior to transfusion into patients.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER

Medical Dictionary

A functional, semi-permeable membrane separating the brain and cerebrospinal ?uid from the blood. It allows small and lipid-soluble molecules to pass freely but is impermeable to large or ionised molecules and cells.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD CLOT

Medical Dictionary

A blood clot arises when blood comes into contact with a foreign surface – for example, damaged blood vessels – or when tissue factors are released from damaged tissue. An initial plug of PLATELETS is converted to a de?nitive clot by the deposition of FIBRIN, which is formed by the clotting cascade and erythrocytes. (See COAGULATION.)... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD CORPUSCLE

Medical Dictionary

See ERYTHROCYTES and LEUCOCYTES.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD COUNT

Medical Dictionary

The number of each of the cellular components per litre of blood. It may be calculated using a microscope or by an automated process.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD DONOR

Medical Dictionary

An individual who donates his or her own blood for use in patients of compatible blood group who require transfusion.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD GASES

Medical Dictionary

Speci?cally, this describes the measurement of the tensions of oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood. However, it is commonly used to describe the analysis of a sample of heparinised arterial blood for measurement of oxygen, carbon dioxide, oxygen saturation, pH, bicarbonate, and base excess (the amount of acid required to return a unit volume of the blood to normal pH). These values are vital in monitoring the severity of illness in patients receiving intensive care or who have severe respiratory illness, as they provide a guide to the e?ectiveness of oxygen transport between the outside air and the body tissues. Thus they are both a guide to whether the patient is being optimally ventilated, and also a general guide to the severity of their illness.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD GROUPS

Medical Dictionary

People are divided into four main groups in respect of a certain reaction of the blood. This depends upon the capacity of the serum of one person’s blood to cause the red cells of another’s to stick together (agglutinate). The reaction depends on antigens (see ANTIGEN), known as agglutinogens, in the erythrocytes and on ANTIBODIES, known as agglutinins, in the serum. There are two of each, the agglutinogens being known as A and B. A person’s erythrocytes may have (1) no agglutinogens, (2) agglutinogen A, (3) agglutinogen B, (4) agglutinogens A and B: these are the four groups. Since the identi?cation of the ABO and Rhesus factors (see below), around 400 other antigens have been discovered, but they cause few problems over transfusions.

In blood transfusion, the person giving and the person receiving the blood must belong to the same blood group, or a dangerous reaction will take place from the agglutination that occurs when blood of a di?erent group is present. One exception is that group O Rhesus-negative blood can be used in an emergency for anybody.

Rhesus factor In addition to the A and B agglutinogens (or antigens), there is another one known as the Rhesus (or Rh) factor – so named because there is a similar antigen in the red blood corpuscles of the Rhesus monkey. About 84 per cent of the population have this Rh factor in their blood and are therefore known as ‘Rh-positive’. The remaining 16 per cent who do not possess the factor are known as ‘Rh-negative’.

The practical importance of the Rh factor is that, unlike the A and B agglutinogens, there are no naturally occurring Rh antibodies. However, such antibodies may develop in a Rh-negative person if the Rh antigen is introduced into his or her circulation. This can occur (a) if a Rh-negative person is given a transfusion of Rh-positive blood, and (b) if a Rh-negative mother married to a Rh-positive husband becomes pregnant and the fetus is Rh-positive. If the latter happens, the mother develops Rh antibodies which can pass into the fetal circulation, where they react with the baby’s Rh antigen and cause HAEMOLYTIC DISEASE of the fetus and newborn. This means that, untreated, the child may be stillborn or become jaundiced shortly after birth.

As about one in six expectant mothers is Rh-negative, a blood-group examination is now considered an essential part of the antenatal examination of a pregnant woman. All such Rh-negative expectant mothers are now given a ‘Rhesus card’ showing that they belong to the rhesus-negative blood group. This card should always be carried with them. Rh-positive blood should never be transfused to a Rh-negative girl or woman.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD PRESSURE

Medical Dictionary

Blood pressure is that pressure which must be applied to an artery in order to stop the pulse beyond the point of pressure. It may be roughly estimated by feeling the pulse at the wrist, or accurately measured using a SPHYGMOMANOMETER. It is dependent on the pumping force of the heart, together with the volume of blood, and on the elasticity of the blood vessels.

The blood pressure is biphasic, being greatest (systolic pressure) at each heartbeat and falling (diastolic pressure) between beats. The average systolic pressure is around 100 mm Hg in children and 120 mm Hg in young adults, generally rising with age as the arteries get thicker and harder. Diastolic pressure in a healthy young adult is about 80 mm Hg, and a rise in diastolic pressure is often a surer indicator of HYPERTENSION than is a rise in systolic pressure; the latter is more sensitive to changes of body position and emotional mood. Hypertension has various causes, the most important of which are kidney disease (see KIDNEYS, DISEASES OF), genetic predisposition and, to some extent, mental stress. Systolic pressure may well be over 200 mm Hg. Abnormal hypertension is often accompanied by arterial disease (see ARTERIES, DISEASES OF) with an increased risk of STROKE, heart attack and heart failure (see HEART, DISEASES OF). Various ANTIHYPERTENSIVE DRUGS are available; these should be carefully evaluated, considering the patient’s full clinical history, before use.

HYPOTENSION may result from super?cial vasodilation (for example, after a bath, in fevers or as a side-e?ect of medication, particularly that prescribed for high blood pressure) and occur in weakening diseases or heart failure. The blood pressure generally falls on standing, leading to temporary postural hypotension – a particular danger in elderly people.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD ROOT

Herbal Manual

Sanguinaria canadensis. N.O. Papaveraceae.

Habitat: Widely distributed throughout North America.

Features ? Root reddish-brown, wrinkled lengthwise, about half-inch thick. Fracture short. Section whitish, with many small, red resin cells which sometimes suffuse the whole. Heavy odour, bitter and harsh to the taste.

Part used ? Root.

Action: Stimulant, tonic, expectorant.

Pulmonary complaints and bronchitis. Should be administered in whooping-cough and croup until emesis occurs. The powdered root is used as a snuff in nasal catarrh, and externally in ringworm and other skin eruptions. The American Thomsonians use it in the treatment of adenoids. Dose, 10 to 20 grains of the powdered root.... Herbal Manual

BLOOD TEST

Medical Dictionary

Removal of venous, capillary or arterial blood for haematological, microbiological or biochemical laboratory investigations.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD TRANSFUSION

Medical Dictionary

See TRANSFUSION – Transfusion of blood.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD VESSEL

Medical Dictionary

Tube through which blood is conducted from or to the heart. Blood from the heart is conducted via arteries and arterioles through capillaries and back to the heart via venules and then veins. (See ARTERIES and VEINS.)... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD, DISEASES OF

Medical Dictionary

See ANAEMIA; LEUKAEMIA; LYMPHOMA; MYELOMATOSIS; THROMBOSIS.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD-LETTING

Medical Dictionary

See VENESECTION.... Medical Dictionary

BLOOD-POISONING

Medical Dictionary

See SEPTICAEMIA.... Medical Dictionary

BLOODROOT

Love, Protection, Purification...

CIRCULATORY SYSTEM OF THE BLOOD

Medical Dictionary

The course of the circulation is as follows: the veins pour their blood, coming from the head, trunk, limbs and abdominal organs, into the right atrium of the HEART. This contracts and drives the blood into the right ventricle, which then forces the blood into the LUNGS by way of the pulmonary artery. Here it is contained in thin-walled capillaries, over which the air plays freely, and through which gases pass readily out and in. The blood gives o? carbon dioxide (CO2) and takes up oxygen (see RESPIRATION), and passes on by the pulmonary veins to the left atrium of the heart. The left atrium expels it into the left ventricle, which forces it on into the aorta, by which it is distributed all over the body. Passing through capillaries in the various tissues, it enters venules, then veins, which ultimately unite into two great veins, the superior and the inferior vena cava, these emptying into the right atrium. This complete circle is accomplished by any particular drop of blood in about half a minute.

In one part of the body there is a further complication. The veins coming from the bowels, charged with food material and other products, split up, and their blood undergoes a second capillary circulation through the liver. Here it is relieved of some food material and puri?ed, and then passes into the inferior vena cava, and so to the right atrium. This is known as the portal circulation.

The circle is maintained always in one direction by four valves, situated one at the outlet from each cavity of the heart.

The blood in the arteries going to the body generally is bright red, that in the veins dull red in colour, owing to the former being charged with oxygen and the latter with carbon dioxide (see RESPIRATION). For the same reason the blood in the pulmonary artery is dark, that in the pulmonary veins is bright. There is no direct communication between the right and left sides of the heart, the blood passing from the right ventricle to the left atrium through the lungs.

In the embryo, before birth, the course of circulation is somewhat di?erent, owing to the fact that no nourishment comes from the bowels nor air into the lungs. Accordingly, two large arteries pass out of the navel, and convey blood to be changed by contact with maternal blood (see PLACENTA), while a large vein brings this blood back again. There are also communications between the right and left atria, and between pulmonary artery and aorta. The latter is known as the ductus arteriosus. At birth all these extra vessels and connections close and rapidly shrivel up.... Medical Dictionary

DEFECTIVE BLOOD FORMATION

Medical Dictionary

This is the main cause of anaemia in infections. The micro-organism responsible for the infection has a deleterious e?ect upon the blood-forming organs, just as it does upon other parts of the body.

Toxins. In conditions such as chronic glomerulonephritis (see KIDNEYS, DISEASES OF) and URAEMIA there is a severe anaemia due to the e?ect of the disease upon blood formation.

Drugs. Certain drugs, such as aspirin and the non-steroidal anti-in?ammatory drugs, may cause occult gastrointestinal bleeding.... Medical Dictionary

DISCOVER OREGON GRAPE ROOT TEA

Beneficial Teas

If you want to try a special type of herbal tea, there’s Oregon grape root tea! It has a slightly bitter taste, but that shouldn’t discourage you. It also has plenty of health benefits which are bound to keep you healthy. Read to find out more about Oregon grape root tea! About Oregon Grape Root Tea Oregon grape root tea is made from the root of the Oregon grape. The plant is an evergreen shrub which grows along the North American west coast. The plant can grow up to 5m tall. The leaves are similar to those of holly, and the stems and twigs are thick and corky. The flowers are yellow-colored and bloom in late spring. The fruits are small, purplish-black, with a dusty appearance, and they contain large seeds. The Oregon grape is in no way related to normal grapes. The name of the tree comes from the similarity of its berries to the grapes’ berries. Constituents of Oregon Grape Root Tea It is not surprising that the root is used to make Oregon grape root tea. The root is actually the part of the tea which contains the most active constituents. A cup of Oregon grape root tea contains many alkaloids (berberine) and phytochemicals, as well as tannins. How to prepare Oregon Grape Root Tea It isn’t difficult to make a cup of Oregon grape root tea. Place one teaspoon of dried root in a cup filled with boiling water. Let it steep for about 10-15 minutes. Once the steeping time ends, remove the dried herbs from the cup. If Oregon grape root tea is too bitter for your taste, you can add honey or sugar to sweeten it. Oregon Grape Root Tea Benefits Thanks to its important constituents, Oregon grape root tea brings you many health benefits. First of all, Oregon grape root tea is used in the treatment for dyspepsia (indigestion) and diarrhea, and it helps you fight intestinal parasites. It also increases the speed to the flow of bile, which makes it useful in the treatment for gallbladder pain, gallstones, hepatitis, and jaundice. The alkaloids found in Oregon grape root tea help treat typhoid, tuberculosis in its early stage, and various digestive disorders. It can even help with small problems, such as stomach cramps and abdominal pains. It also works as a potential anti-carcinogenic, speeding up the recovery from chemotherapy and radiation therapies. Oregon grape root teacan work as a lymphatic and liver stimulating blood cleanser. It is good for your liver as it helps release stacked away iron from the liver into the blood stream. It might also help you fight tumors in the bladder and colon. Oregon grape root tea can help you even when it’s applied topically. It is useful when treating psoriasis, eczema, athlete’s foot, acne, and other fungal infections. It also helps in easing inflammation, irritation, and itching of the skin. Oregon Grape Root Tea Side Effects First, it’s not recommended that you drink Oregon grape root tea if you are pregnant. If you do, it might cause uterine contractions. It is also best that you not consume Oregon grape root tea if you’ve gotchronic gastrointestinal irritation or inflammation. It will only worsen the symptoms. Be careful with how much Oregon grape root tea you drink. Don’t have more than six cups of tea a day, and don’t drink for more than 7 consecutive days. If you drink too much Oregon grape root tea, you’ll get the following symptoms: headaches, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, insomnia, dizziness, and irregular heartbeats. Even if it has a slightly bitter taste, Oregon grape root tea shouldn’t be forgotten. Its many health benefits can help you, if needed.... Beneficial Teas

DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA

Medical Dictionary

These are swellings on the dorsal roots of spinal nerves just proximal to the union of the dorsal and ventral nerve roots. They are situated in the inter-vertebral foramina and contain the cell bodies of sensory neurones. (See SPINAL COLUMN; SPINAL CORD.)... Medical Dictionary

DRAGONS BLOOD

Love, Protection, Exorcism, Potency...

FETAL BLOOD SAMPLING

Medical Dictionary

A procedure performed during a mother’s labour in which a blood sample is taken from a vein in the scalp of the FETUS. This enables tests to be performed that indicate whether the fetus is, for example, su?ering from a shortage of oxygen (HYPOXIA). If so, the obstetrician will usually accelerate the baby’s birth.... Medical Dictionary

GRAVEL ROOT

Herbal Manual

Eupatorium purpureum. N.O. Compositae.

Synonym: Eupatorium purpureum is also called Gravel Weed and Queen of the

Meadow, from which the medicinal "Gravel Root" is obtained.

Habitat: Gravel Root is a native of the United States, and must not be confused with the English Queen of the Meadow or Meadowsweet (Spiraea ulmaria).

Features ? Our present subject is a member of the Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) family, and sometimes reaches six feet in height at full growth. It is peculiar for a purple band about an inch broad round the leaf joint. Pale purple to white flowers bloom in August and September. The rhizome, as the medicinal "root" should more properly be termed, is hard and tough, up to an inch thick, with a nearly white wood and thin grey-brown bark. Short, lateral branches give off thin, tough root several inches long.

Part used ? Root.

Action: Diuretic and stimulant.

Gravel root is much prescribed for cases of stone in the bladder and certain other troubles of the kidneys and urinary apparatus. A decoction of 1 ounce of the root to 1 pint (reduced from 1 1/2 pints) of water is made, and taken in wineglass doses. Gravel root is also met with in nervine formulae, in which its tonic properties are recognised.

The American physio-medical or "Thomsonite" M.D., F. H. England, has said that Gravel Root "induces very little stimulation. It expends nearly all its influence on the kidneys, bladder and uterus. It probably influences the whole sympathetic nervous system. Its use promotes the flow of urine as scarcely anything else will."... Herbal Manual

GRAVEL ROOT TEA

Beneficial Teas

Gravel Root Tea is known for its diuretic, astringent and anti-inflammatory properties. Gravel root (eupatorium purpureum) is a perennial plant that can grow up to 5 feet tall, having pointed oblong leaves and small pink flowers. It grows in North America, from southern Canada through Florida. The main constituents of gravel root are tannins, flavonoids and bitter principles. How To Make Gravel Root Tea To brew Gravel Root Tea, you will need to boil 1 teaspoon of gravel root in a cup of water. Let the mix stand for about 10 minutes. Optionally you can add sugar or honey, depending on your preferences. Gravel root tea can be drank 3 times a day! Gravel Root Tea Benefits
  • Helps prevent the formation of kidney and bladder stones.
  • Effective in treating gout.
  • Relieves fever by encouraging sweating.
  • Treats various urinary problems.
  • Helps relieve constipation.
  • Reduces stomach acidity.
  • In some cases, it can act as an anti-inflammatory, reducing swelling.
Gravel Root Tea Side Effects
  • Due to the fact that Gravel Root Tea contains chemicals called hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), it may block blood flow and cause liver damage.
  • Pregnant women should avoid drinking Gravel Root Tea since it can produce birth defects. Also, if you are breastfeeding, do not drink gravel root tea, because the chemicals (PAs) can affect the breast-milk and harm the baby.
  • Do not apply gravel root on wounds or broken skin. The chemicals can be absorbed quickly through broken skin and can lead to dangerous body-wide toxicity.
Gravel Root Tea makes and excellent choice, having a lot of health benefits. Just make sure you avoid drinking too much gravel root tea in order to stay away from its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

INDIGO ROOT TEA

Beneficial Teas

Indigo Root Tea has been known for many years due to its antiseptic, astringent, antibiotic, emetic and antibacterial properties. Wild indigo (baptisia tinctoria) is a herbaceous annual plant that can be recognized by its branching stems and bluish green leaves. Its flowers usually bloom during May and September and they pose as bright yellow flowers. The constituents of Indigo Root Tea are flavonoids, isoflavones, alkaloids, coumarins and polysaccharides. They usually are active when the indigoo root is made into a decoction or used as a tincture. How To Make Indigo Root Tea If you want to make Indigo Root Tea, simply place a handful of indigo root in a cup of boiling water for about 10-15 minutes. After that, take it out of the heat and let it stand for about 3 minutes. Indigo Root Tea Benefits
  • Strenghtens the immune system.
  • Can speed recovery from the common cold.
  • Helps heal wounds and cuts.
  • Treats respiratory infections such as pharyngitis and tonsilitis.
  • Heals sore thorat.
  • Helps reduce fever.
  • Helps in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome when combined with echinacea.
Indigo Root Tea Side Effects
  • Taking in large doses, Indigo Root Tea can cause nausea, diarrhea, voming or asphyxiation.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Indigo Root Tea.
  • People with auto-immune disorders should not drink Indigo Root Tea.
Indigo Root Tea is an amazing tea with many health benefits. Just make sure you don’t drink too much indigo root tea, in order not to experience any of its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

LOSS OF BLOOD

Medical Dictionary

As a result of trauma. This is perhaps the simplest example of all, when, as a result of an accident involving a large artery, there is severe haemorrhage.

Menstruation. The regular monthly loss of blood which women sustain as a result of menstruation always puts a strain on the blood-forming organs. If this loss is excessive, then over a period of time it may lead to quite severe anaemia.

Childbirth. A considerable amount of blood is always lost at childbirth; if this is severe, or if the woman was anaemic during pregnancy, a severe degree of anaemia may develop.

Bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. The best example here is anaemia due to ‘bleeding piles’ (see HAEMORRHOIDS). Such bleeding, even though slight, is a common cause of anaemia in both men and women if maintained over a long period of time. The haemorrhage may be more acute and occur from a DUODENAL ULCER or gastric ulcer (see STOMACH, DISEASES OF), when it is known as haematemesis.

Certain blood diseases, such as PURPURA and HAEMOPHILIA, which are characterised by bleeding.... Medical Dictionary

NATIONAL BLOOD AUTHORITY

Medical Dictionary

This body manages regional TRANSFUSION centres. Among its aims are the maintenance and promotion of blood and blood products based on a system of voluntary donors; implementing a cost-e?ective national strategy for ensuring adequate supplies of blood and its products to meet national needs; and ensuring high standards of safety and quality.... Medical Dictionary

ORRIS ROOT

Love, Protection, Divination...

PERIPHERAL-BLOOD STEM-CELL TRANSPLANTS

Medical Dictionary

These have almost completely replaced BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT, used to treat malignancies such as LEUKAEMIA and LYMPHOMA for the past 20 years. The high doses of CHEMOTHERAPY or RADIOTHERAPY used to treat these diseases destroy the bone marrow which contains stem cells from which all the blood cells derive. In 1989 stem cells were found in the blood during recovery from chemotherapy. By giving growth factors (cytokines), the number of stem cells in the blood increased for about three to four days. In a peripheral-blood stem-cell transplant, these cells can be separated from the peripheral blood, without a general anaesthetic. The cells taken by either method are then frozen and returned intravenously after the chemotherapy or radiotherapy is completed. Once transplanted, the stem cells usually take less than three weeks to repopulate the blood, compared to a month or more for a bone marrow transplant. This means that there is less risk of infection or bleeding during the recovery from the transplant. The whole procedure has a mortality risk of less than 5 per cent – half the risk of a bone marrow transplant.... Medical Dictionary

PINKROOT

Herbal Manual

Spigelia marilandica. N.O. Loganiaceae.

Synonym: Carolina Pink, Indian Pink, Maryland Pink, Worm-grass. Habitat: Southern states of U.S.A

Features ? Imported root is rather less than a quarter of an inch thick, cup-shaped scars on upper surface, many rootlets underneath.

Part used ? Root. Action: Anthelmintic.

Widely used throughout the United States, where it is considered the best of the vermifuges, and is given to both children and adults suffering from the pests. A purgative such as Senna is usually added, as it is said to cause the Spigelia to act more quickly and effectively. An infusion of 1 ounce to

1 pint is given night and morning, in doses varying with the patient's age up to one teacupful for adults.

In this country such remedies as Tansy and Wormwood are more commonly prescribed in the treatment of worms.... Herbal Manual

PLEURISY ROOT

Herbal Manual

Asclepias tuberosa. N.O. Asclepiadaceae.

Synonym: Butterfly Weed, Tuber Root, Wind Root. Habitat: Moist, loamy soil. Indigenous to U.S.A

Features ? Stem two to three feet high, contains milky juice. Root, wrinkled longitudinally, light brown outer surface, whitish internally ; fracture tough, irregular. Rootstock knotty, faintly ringed. Acrid taste.

Part used ? Root.

Action: Diaphoretic, expectorant, antispasmodic.

Chest complaints; acts directly on the lungs, and stimulates sweat glands. Relaxes capillaries, relieving strain on heart and lungs. Reduces pain and assists breathing in pleurisy. Infusion of 1 ounce of the powdered root with 1 pint of boiling water is taken in wineglass doses, to which a teaspoonful of composition powder (Myrica compound) may be added with advantage.... Herbal Manual

PLEURISY ROOT TEA - TEA OF THE INDIGENOUS INDIANS

Beneficial Teas

Pleurisy root tea is an aromatic herbal tea which you are bound to enjoy. The indigenous Indians used to drink it a lot, especially thanks to its health benefits. About Pleurisy Root Tea Pleurisy root tea is made from the roots of the pleurisy plant, also known as the butterfly weed. The plant grows in North America. It can grow up to 1m tall, with multiple stems and spirally-arranged, spear-pointed leaves that are 5-12cm long. Clusters of orange or yellow flowers bloom during summertime, attracting butterflies, insects and birds. The plant can be found growing on dry, open fields, under direct sunlight. How to prepare Pleurisy Root Tea If you want to enjoy a cup of pleurisy root tea, add a teaspoon of dried, chopped roots to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for 10-15 minutes before straining it to remove the herbs. Sweeten it with honey or fruit juice, if necessary. Pleurisy Root Tea Benefits Pleurisy root contains various active constituents, such as glycosides, resins, amino acids, volatile oil, glucosidal principal, lupeol, and alkaloids. They are transferred to the pleurisy root tea, as well. Because if this, the tea has lots of important health benefits. Pleurisy root tea is often included in treatments for various respiratory ailments and pulmonary infections, for example pleurisy, asthma, bronchitis or pneumonia. It helps alleviate pain and congestion by reducing the mucus thickness in the lungs and enabling the patient to expel the blockage. Drinking pleurisy root tea helps both with fevers and detoxification, as it stimulates sweating and perspiration. It is also useful as an herbal treatment for colds and influenza. You can also drink pleurisy root tea if you’ve got problems with diarrhea, dysentery, chronic rheumatism, colic, muscle tension and spasm. Pleurisy root tea can also be used topically. You can soak a clean cloth with the tea and use it to treat swellings, bruises, lameness, wounds and skin ulcers. Pleurisy Root Tea Side Effects If you’re pregnant, you shouldn’t drink pleurisy root tea. It may cause uterine contractions, which could lead to miscarriages. Also, it is safer not to drink this tea if you’re breast feeding. Children shouldn’t drink pleurisy root tea either, because of the small amount of cardiac glycosides. You should be careful with the amount of pleurisy root tea you drink if you’ve got cardiovascular problems or you’re taking cardiac glycosides. Also, if you’re taking any other medication, check with your doctor if it’s safe to drink pleurisy root tea. Don’t drink more than 3-4 cups of pleurisy root tea a day. If you drink too much, it might lead to symptoms such as intestinal cramping, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Pleurisy root tea is ideal for an everyday beverage. It has many health benefits and only a few side effects. Once you try it, you’ll surely enjoy it!... Beneficial Teas

POKE ROOT

Herbal Manual

Phytolacca decandra. N.O. Phytolaccaceae.

Synonym: Garget, Pigeon Berry.

Habitat: U.S.A. Cultivated on a sm.ill scale in England for medicinal purposes.

Features ? The root is obtainable in longitudinally split pieces or in transverse slices. Ringed, brownish-grey externally, hard and whitish inside; fibrous fracture. Berries purplish-black, nearly globular, ten carpels, each containing one lens-shaped seed.

Part used ? Root, berries. Action: Alterative, cathartic.

Chronic rheumatism and skin diseases. Of some use in dyspepsia. Action of root stronger than berries. For rheumatism the root is often compounded with Black Cohosh and Wintergreen.

Preparation and dosage vary considerably with the condition of the root. Thurston, Hammer and other physio-medical practitioners recommend that only the green root should be used, owing to, rapid deterioration. These herbalists use the fresh root largely in hardening of the liver and reduced biliary flow.... Herbal Manual

RATTLESNAKE ROOT

Protection, Money ...

RED BLOOD CELL

Medical Dictionary

See ERYTHROCYTES; BLOOD.... Medical Dictionary

ROOT FILLING

Medical Dictionary

Also called root-canal therapy, this is the treatment given when the nerve of a tooth (see TEETH) has been exposed while the tooth is being prepared for a ?lling, or if it has died or become infected. The nerve debris is removed and, when the chamber is clear of infection, an inert material is inserted to seal o? the root.... Medical Dictionary

ROOT-CAUSE ANALYSIS

Community Health

A process for identifying the basic or causal factor(s) that underlie variations in performance, including the occurrence or possible occurrence of an error.... Community Health

ROOTS

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SNAKEROOT

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STONE ROOT TEA BENEFITS AND SIDE EFFECTS

Beneficial Teas

Stone Root Tea comes from a strong herb mainly used to treat kidney issues, but it is also renowned for its improvement in the heart function. Drink a pleasant Stone Root Tea cup to strengthen your heart and feel your body lighter and healthier. Description of Stone Root Tea Stone root is a perennially growing herb, which belongs to mint family; it bears a potent lemon aroma and it is native to North America. Benefits of Stone Root Tea Stone Root Tea is used as a diuretic in removing excess fluids from the body. It can treat urinary tract problems including bladder pain and swelling stones in the kidney. Therefore it is great in increasing urine flow that results in relieving water retention. It is also known that people use Stone Root Tea to treat stomach ache and intestinal problems like indigestion. Sometimes, Stone Root Tea is effective in the treatment of headaches, hemorrhoids, laryngitis, pharyngitis or even dysentery. Moreover, Stone Root Tea has a tonic action making it effective in atonic conditions of the heart muscles, on the walls of the veins and capillaries. Its fresh leaves can be used to heal cuts, bruises and sores. Side effects of Stone Root Tea Although Stone Root Tea is a perfect remedy for gastrointestinal and circulatory problems, it can bring some unpleasant side effects with it. Drank in large quantities can cause diarrhea, nausea, dizziness, painful urination, or stomach pain. Pregnant or nursing women should avoid taking this tea without the consult of their doctor. You should also use with caution if you have high blood pressure. Stone Root Tea is effective all the way, making your heart stronger and bringing relief in the whole body. No more pains and discomfort in your life, but more and more vitality. Stone Root Tea is making a change for you.   Stone Root Tea Benefits and Side Effects... Beneficial Teas

TEA FOR BLOOD PRESSURE

Beneficial Teas

As a natural beverage, a cup of tea brings you many health benefits. One of them is related to blood pressure. Based on the type of tea you drink, it can help lower your blood pressure. Find out more about teas for blood pressure! Problems with blood pressure Blood pressure represents the pressure made by the circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. However, problems appear in the case of hypertension and hypotension. Hypertension is a medical condition caused by a high blood pressure, while hypotension is caused by a low blood pressure. Both can be treated with one of the various types of tea for blood pressure. Tea for high blood pressure If you’ve got problems with hypertension (high blood pressure), hibiscus tea can help, as it is known to lower blood pressure. You can also pick one of these herbal teas: chrysanthemum tea, flax tea, periwinkle tea, red root tea, self-heal tea, white peony root tea, valerian tea, or wild cherry bark tea. You can also drink hyssop tea, barberry tea, and rosemary tea, regardless of the blood pressure problem. These three teas will help regulate your blood pressure and reduce the risk of getting either high or low blood pressure problems. Tea for low blood pressure In the case of hypotension (low blood pressure), some of the teas you can try include lovage tea, ephedra tea, wu yi tea, cat’s claw tea, vervain tea, or wheatgrass tea. Black tea can help too, though you have to be careful with it as it has a high content of caffeine. Forbidden teas for blood pressure problems There are several teas which you should avoid drinking, no matter if you’ve got problems with high blood pressure or low blood pressure. The list of teas you shouldn’t drink includes arnica tea, black cohosh tea, gentian tea, juniper tea, lobelia tea, red ginseng tea, sage tea, stone root tea, and yohimbe tea. Also, generally it isn’t recommended to drink tea that lowers blood pressure if you’ve got hypotension, or tea that leads to high blood pressure if you’ve got hypertension. Whether you’ve got problems with high blood pressure or low blood pressure, try a more natural treatment: choose one of the many teas for blood pressure!... Beneficial Teas

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WHITE PEONY ROOT TEA BENEFITS

Beneficial Teas

White Peony Root Tea is one of the most important herbs in Asian medicine, being used since ancient times to treat liver problems and to improve women’s general health. White Peony Root Tea can be made from a plant called Chinese peony or common garden peony, a perennial herb that grows in Eastern China, southern Tibet and Siberia. You can recognize it after its big white flowers and yellow stamens. The leaves are deep green and medium sized. White Peony Root Properties The best thing about White Peony Root Tea is that its properties contribute to a better general health of the human body, thanks to a high concentration of acids and amino-acids and also to a great alkaline conductivity. The main ingredient in White Peony Root Tea is paeoniflorin, a substance that has a high anti-spastic action in many areas of your system. The other active substances that can be found in this tea and enhance the paeonflorin’s effect are flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, tannins and polysaccharides. White Peony Root Benefits White Peony Root Tea has anti-inflammatory, sedative, analgesic and diuretic properties. This tea is a great help if you suffer from one of the following conditions: - Liver malfunction, by energizing it thanks to its alkaline property and helping it flush away all the toxins. - Bad blood circulation or poor blood nourishment. Also, White Peony Tea can lower your blood pressure. - Menstrual problems that consist of heavy bleedings and aggravated abdominal pain, by calming the affected area and by bringing relief. - Abdominal and chest pains, dizziness, headaches. - Epilepsy, by stopping seizures and convulsions and by nourishing your nervous system, so that the negative reaction can be eliminated. How to make White Peony Root Tea Infusion Preparing White Peony Root Tea infusion is very easy. Use a teaspoon of White Peony Root for every cup of tea you want to make. Put the herbs in a teapot and add boiling water. Wait for 10 or 15 minutes (depending on the amount of water you’re using) and drink it hot or cold. Don’t take more than 3 cups per day. White Peony Root Tea Side Effects White Peony Root Tea is safe as long as you take it for a short amount of time. Taken in high dosages, it may cause rashes and problems of the nervous system. White Peony Root Tea is not to be taken unsupervised and it’s a medical treatment. Do not drink it as often as you drink your coffee! Also, a higher dosage will not make your general health improve any faster. Follow our recommendations and talk to a doctor before making any move. White Peony Root Tea Contraindications If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you should not take White Peony Root Tea, because it may cause uterine contractions and blood clotting. But if you have the green light from your doctor, there’s no reason not to try White Peony Root Tea. Add it to your medicine cabinet, follow our instructions and enjoy the wonderful benefits of White Peony Root Tea responsibly!... Beneficial Teas