Periploca Aphylla | Health Dictionary

Decne.

Family: Asclepiadaceae; Periplo- caceae.

Habitat: Punjab and Rajasthan.

Folk: Barri (Punjab).

Action: Plant—stomachic; used in cerebral fever. Bark—purgative. Latex—used against tumours and swellings.

The leaves and stems contain 2.2% of resin alcohol, a bitter substance, tannin and small quantities of a glucosidal principle which produces first a decrease and then an increase in blood pressure. The bark contain 8% tannin.


Periploca Aphylla | Health Dictionary

Keywords of this word: Periploca Aphylla


CAPPARIS APHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Roth.

Synonym: C. decidua Edgew.

Family: Capparidaceae.

Habitat: Rajasthan, Punjab and Sindh; southward to Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

English: Caper Berry.

Ayurvedic: Karira, Krakar, Apatra, Granthila, Marubhoo-ruuha, Niguudhapatra, Karila.

Unani: Kabar, Kabar-ul-Hind, Kabar-e-Hindi; Tenti.

Siddha/Tamil: Chhengan.

Folk: Tenti.

Action: Anti-inflammatory (used for enlarged cervical glands, sciatica, rheumatoid arthritis; externally on swellings, skin eruptions, ringworm). Fruits and seeds—used for urinary purulent discharges and dysentery. Flowers and seeds— antimicrobial. The fruit is used as a pickle.

The root bark contains spermidine alkaloids, used for inflammations, asthma and gout.

Activity of the seed volatiles against vibro cholerae has been recorded.

Aqueous extract of the plant exhibits anthelmintic activity; seeds contain antibacterial principles—glucocapparin; isothiocynate aglycone of glucocap- parin.

The blanched fruits, when fed to rats at 10% dietary fibre level, showed a significant hypocholesterolaemic effect, which is attributed to its hemicel- lose content.

Pickled fruits are use for destroying intestinal worms.

Dosage: Leaf, root—50-125 mg (CCRAS.)

Folk: Hains, Kanthaar.

Action: Antiseptic, antipyretic. Used for eczema and scabies.

Leaves contain taraxasterol, alpha- and beta-amyrin and beta-sitosterol, erythrodiol and betulin.

Dosage: Root—5-10 g powder. (CCRAS.)... Indian Medicinal Plants

CLAUSENA PENTAPHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

(Roxb.) DC.

Family: Rutaceae.

Habitat: The sub-Himalayan tract from Garhwal to Sikkim; also in Chakrata range.

Folk: Ratanjot (var.), Rowana. Surasi is a doubtful synonym.

Action: Bark—anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic; used in veterinary medicine for wounds and sprains.

Aerial parts contain coumarins— clausmarins A and B. Coumarins exhibit spasmolytic activity. The root also contains coumarins. Root and stem bark of Clausena excavata Burm. f. Eastern sub-Himalayan tract, Orissa and Bihar) also contain coumarins— clausenin and clausenidin. The root bark exhibits antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gramnegative bacteria.

A related species, C. anisata (Willd.) Oliver, is reported from Uttar Pradesh. Ethanolic extract of the aerial parts exhibited spasmolytic activity. The fu- ranocoumarins, anisolactone, xantho- toxol, indicolactone, imperatorin and 2', 3'-epoxy-anisolactone have been isolated from the extract.

In West African traditional medicine, the decoction of the root is given to control convulsions in children. The anticonvulsant agent has been found to be heliettin, extracted from the stem bark and roots.... Indian Medicinal Plants

DIOSCOREA PENTAPHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Linn.

Synonym: D. triphylla var. doemona Prain & Burkill.

Family: Dioscoreaceae.

Habitat: Native to tropical Asia; distributed throughout India.

Ayurvedic: Vaaraahikanda (var., dry pieces are sold as Vidaarikanda).

Folk: Kaantaalu.

Action: Tubers contain 71.0780.77% carbohydrates, 8.68-15.93% albuminoids. Tubers are used to disperse swellings.... Indian Medicinal Plants

GLYCOSMIS PENTAPHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

(Retz.) DC.

Synonym: G. arborea (Roxb.) A. DC.

G. cochinchinensis Gamble. Limonia pentaphylla Retz.

Family: Rutaceae.

Habitat: Peninsular India and Andaman Islands. Cultivated in gardens.

Ayurvedic: Vana-nimbuukaa, Ashwa-shaakhota.

Siddha/Tamil: Konji, Amam, Kula-pannai.

Folk: Bana-Nimbu, Paanal (Kerala).

Action: Plant—bechic, anti- anaemic, antirheumatic. Root— anti-inflammatory. Leaf—used in Jaundice and liver disorders, eczema and other skin affections. Leaf and root—vermifuge, febrifuge. A paste of the wood is applied externally to pimples.

Leaf extract from a Sri Lankan plant yielded the alkaloids arborine, skim- mianine and arborinine. The steam distillate of leaves showed significant antifungal activity.... Indian Medicinal Plants

INDIGOFERA ENNEAPHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Linn.

Synonym: I. linnaei Ali.

Family: Fabaceae.

Habitat: The Himalayas up to 1,200 m and in plains of India.

English: Trailing indigo.

Ayurvedic: Vaasukaa.

Siddha/Tamil: Cheppunerinjil.

Folk: Hanumaan-buuti, Bhui-nila.

Action: Juice of the plant— antiscorbutic, diuretic, alterative. The plant, boiled with oil, is applied to burns. A decoction is given in epilepsy and insanity.

The plant contains two unsaturat- ed hydrocarbons—indigoferin and en- neaphyllin. The seeds contain 37.8% protein, also yield lipids (4.4%) containing palmitic and oleic acid. The toxicity of the plant is attributed to a non-protein amino acid, indospicine (6-amidino-2-aminohexanoic acid). (Consumption of the plant produces a neurological syndrome, known as Birdsville disease, in horses. The toxic- ity is greatly reduced when the material is chopped and dried.)

The aerial parts gave 3-nitropropa- noyl esters of D-glucose.... Indian Medicinal Plants

PERIPLOCA APHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Decne.

Family: Asclepiadaceae; Periplo- caceae.

Habitat: Punjab and Rajasthan.

Folk: Barri (Punjab).

Action: Plant—stomachic; used in cerebral fever. Bark—purgative. Latex—used against tumours and swellings.

The leaves and stems contain 2.2% of resin alcohol, a bitter substance, tannin and small quantities of a glucosidal principle which produces first a decrease and then an increase in blood pressure. The bark contain 8% tannin.... Indian Medicinal Plants

PERIPLOCA CALOPHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Falc.

Family: Asclepiadaceae.

Habitat: The Himalayas, from Kashmir to Nepal and Meghalaya, ascending to 1,800 m.

Ayurvedic: Krishna Saarivaa (substitute). (Cryptolepis buchanani is equated with Krishna Saarivaa.)

Action: Used in place of Cryptolepis buchanani and Hemidesmus indicus for rheumatism, urinary and skin diseases.

The glycosides locin, plocin, ploci- nin, calocin, calocinin, as well as triter- penoids, have been reported from the twigs.... Indian Medicinal Plants

RAUVOLFIA TETRAPHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Linn.

Synonym: R. canescens L.

Family: Apocynaceae.

Habitat: Abundant in moist and warm regions of West Bengal, particularly in 24 Parganas and Howrah, and Kerala (as a weed).

Folk: Badaa Chaand.

Action: Root—sedative, hypotensive. Plant juice, mixed with castor oil, is applied to skin diseases and to destroy parasites.

The plant contains a number of alkaloids, including rauvolscine, aj- malicine, canescine, reserpine, pseu- doyohimbine; yohimbine, corynan- thene, raunescine, iso-raunescine and recanescine.

The major alkaloid is rauwolscine (alpha-yohimbine), present in the root bark (0.1%), stem bark (0.2%) and leaves (0.5%).

The roots are often used as a substitute or adulterant of those of R. serpentina, though the reserpine content of the dried root was found to be comparatively low (0.03-0.05%).

Family: Linaceae.

Habitat: The Himalayas from Kashmir to Sikkim; commonly grown in gardens.

English: Winter-Flax, Yellow Flax.

Ayurvedic: Baasanti.

Folk: Abai (Maharashtra).

Action: Plant—used for the treatment of paralysis in Bihar. The crushed leaves and stems are applied to wounds infested with maggots.... Indian Medicinal Plants

TAMARIX APHYLLA

Indian Medicinal Plants

(Linn.) Karst.

Synonym: T. articulata Vahl. T. orientalis Forsk

Family: Tamaricaceae.

Habitat: Saline soils of Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan and Gujarat.

English: Athel, Tamarisk.

Ayurvedic: Maacheeka, Maachikaa.

Unani: Maayin Khurd.

Siddha/Tamil: Sivappattushavukku.

Folk: Laal jhaau. Galls—Chhoti- Maayin.

Action: Galls—astringent. Contain 50% tannin. Bark—contains 14% tannin.

Galls used as a substitute for oak- galls and sumac.

Galls contain polyphenols—gallic acid, ellagic acid, dehydrodigallic acid, dihydrojuglone-5-glucoside, isoferulic acid and juglanin; flavonoids including quercetin, its glucoside, isoquercitrin, its methyl derivative, tamarixetin and tamarixin.... Indian Medicinal Plants