Pongamia Pinnata | Health Dictionary

Pierre.

Synonym: P. glabra Vent. Derris indica (Lam.) Benett.

Family: Papilionaceae; Fabaceae.

Habitat: Western Ghats, tidal forests up to 1,200 m.

English: Pongam Oil tree, Indian Beech.

Ayurvedic: Karanja.

Siddha/Tamil: Pungam.

Action: Oil—applied in scabies, herpes, leucoderma and other cutaneous diseases; over chest in pneumonia and cold; also used internally as cholagogue in sluggish liver. Leaves—juice is prescribed in flatulence, dyspepsia, diarrhoea and cough. An infusion is given for leprosy and gonorrhoea. Root— a paste is used in scrofulous enlargements; juice is used for cleaning foul ulcers and closing fistulous sores. Stem bark—given internally in bleeding piles. Rind of pod and seed—prescribed in bronchitis and whooping cough. Leaf and seed—antileprotic. Leaf and seed oil—antirheumatic.

The tree is rich in flavonoids and related compounds. These include simple flavones, furanoflavonoids, chro- menoflavones, chromenochalcones, coumarones, flavone glucosides, sterols, triterpenes and a modified phenyl- alanine dipeptide. Seeds and seed oil gave karanjin, pongamol, pongapin and kanjone.

The aqueous extract of stem bark shows significant sedative and antipyretic effects in rats, and antispas- modic effect in vitro on smooth muscles.

In Indonesia, a decoction ofthe bark is drunk after child birth.

The aqueous extract of seeds showed significant antiviral activity against herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2 cell lines experimentally. Albino rats, treated with the aqueous extract of seeds, recovered faster from induced infection and skin-burn than the untreated ones.

Dosage: Seed—250 mg powder; 510 g for decoction. (API, Vol. I.)


Pongamia Pinnata | Health Dictionary

Keywords of this word: Pongamia Pinnata


DESMOSTACHYA BIPINNATA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Stapf.

Synonym: Eragrostis cynosuroides Beauv.

Family: Gramineae; Poaceae.

Habitat: Throughout the plains of India in dry and hot areas and in sandy deserts.

English: Sacrificial Grass (smaller var.)

Ayurvedic: Kusha, Suuchyagra, Yagyabhuushana, Kshurapatra.

Siddha/Tamil: Tharubai.

Action: Root—cooling, diuretic, galactagogue, astringent. Used for urinary calculi, and other diseases of the bladder. Clums—used in menorrhagia, dysentery, diarrhoea and in skin diseases. The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India recommended the use of the rootstock in dysuria, vaginal discharges and erysipelas.

Dosage: Rootstock—50-100 g for decoction. (API Vol. III.)... Indian Medicinal Plants

GARUGA PINNATA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Roxb.

Family: Burseraceae.

Habitat: Throughout India, up to 1,000 m on the hills.

English: Grey Downy Balsam.

Ayurvedic: Paaranki, Kharpata. (Kinkiraata, Karnikaara, Mri- galindika are doubtful synonyms.)

Siddha/Tamil: Karre Vembu, Arunelli.

Folk: Ghogar, Toon.

Action: Fruit—stomachic. Leaf— astringent, antiasthmatic. Bark— antidiabetic.

The leaves and stem bark contain sterols, sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol; fatty acids; aliphatic compounds; a mixture of long chain esters; along with tannins and waxes. The leaves also contain garu- garin and amentoflavone. Gum-resin contains alpha-amyrin, butyrospermol and dammarandiol.

Aqueous and ethanolic extract of the leaves exhibit anti-inflammatory and antiallergic activities.... Indian Medicinal Plants

KALANCHOE PINNATA

Indian Medicinal Plants

(Lam.) Pers.

Synonym: Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) Oken. B. calycinum Salisb.

Family: Crassulaceae.

Habitat: Throughout the warm and moist parts of India, especially abundant in West Bengal.

Ayurvedic: Parnabija, Pattharchuur, Pattharchat, Hemsaagar. (Paashaa- nabheda is a misleading synonym.)

Unani: Zakhm-e-Hayaat.

Siddha/Tamil: Runakalli.

Action: Leaf—anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antibacterial. Applied to wounds, burns, boils, swellings.

The methanolic extract of leaves exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity against both exudative and proliferative phases of inflammation. The leaf extract also showed analgesic activity.

The leaves gave flavonoids—querce- tin, kaempferol, quercetin-3-diarabi- noside andkaempferol-3-glucoside; also n-hentriacontane, n-tritriacontane, alpha- and beta-amyrin and sitosterol; p-coumaric, ferulic, syringic, caffeic and p-hydroxybenzoic acids.... Indian Medicinal Plants

KIGELIA PINNATA

Indian Medicinal Plants

(Jacq.) DC.

Synonym: K. africana (Lam.) Benth.

Family: Bignoniaceae.

Habitat: Native to West Africa, cultivated as a roadside tree.

English: Common Sausage tree.

Folk: Jhaar Phaanuus.

Action: Bark—antidysenteric, antirheumatic, diuretic. Used in venereal diseases. Fruits— purgative.

The root bark contains monoter- penoids, pinnatal, isopinnatal and iso- kigelinol napthoquinones.

The fruit gave a cytostatic compound.

In Africa, the root bark is used in the treatment of venereal diseases, haemorrhoids and rheumatism; also as a vermifuge.... Indian Medicinal Plants

LAVANDULA BIPINNATA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Kuntze.

Synonym: L. burmanni Benth.

Family: Labiatae; Lamiaceae.

Habitat: Bihar, Chota Nagpur, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Decan and Konkan southwards to Kerala.

Ayurvedic: Shankhapushpi (Gujarat).

Action: Used as a substitute for Convolvulus pluricaulas Choisy.... Indian Medicinal Plants

PONGAMIA PINNATA

Indian Medicinal Plants

Pierre.

Synonym: P. glabra Vent. Derris indica (Lam.) Benett.

Family: Papilionaceae; Fabaceae.

Habitat: Western Ghats, tidal forests up to 1,200 m.

English: Pongam Oil tree, Indian Beech.

Ayurvedic: Karanja.

Siddha/Tamil: Pungam.

Action: Oil—applied in scabies, herpes, leucoderma and other cutaneous diseases; over chest in pneumonia and cold; also used internally as cholagogue in sluggish liver. Leaves—juice is prescribed in flatulence, dyspepsia, diarrhoea and cough. An infusion is given for leprosy and gonorrhoea. Root— a paste is used in scrofulous enlargements; juice is used for cleaning foul ulcers and closing fistulous sores. Stem bark—given internally in bleeding piles. Rind of pod and seed—prescribed in bronchitis and whooping cough. Leaf and seed—antileprotic. Leaf and seed oil—antirheumatic.

The tree is rich in flavonoids and related compounds. These include simple flavones, furanoflavonoids, chro- menoflavones, chromenochalcones, coumarones, flavone glucosides, sterols, triterpenes and a modified phenyl- alanine dipeptide. Seeds and seed oil gave karanjin, pongamol, pongapin and kanjone.

The aqueous extract of stem bark shows significant sedative and antipyretic effects in rats, and antispas- modic effect in vitro on smooth muscles.

In Indonesia, a decoction ofthe bark is drunk after child birth.

The aqueous extract of seeds showed significant antiviral activity against herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2 cell lines experimentally. Albino rats, treated with the aqueous extract of seeds, recovered faster from induced infection and skin-burn than the untreated ones.

Dosage: Seed—250 mg powder; 510 g for decoction. (API, Vol. I.)... Indian Medicinal Plants

SPONDIAS PINNATA

Indian Medicinal Plants

(Linn. f.) Kurz.

Synonym: S. mangifera Willd.

Family: Anacardiaceae.

Habitat: A small, aromatic tree occurring wild or grown throughout the country for edible fruits.

English: Hog-Plum, Wild Mango. Great Hog-Plum is equated with S. cytherea Sonn, synonym S. dulcis Soland. ex Forst. f.

Ayurvedic: Aamraataka, Aamraata, Aamadaa, Madhuparni, Kundalini, Kapitana, Markataamra.

Siddha/Tamil: Mambulichi, Kat- tuma.

Folk: Jangali Aam.

Action: Fruits, leaves, bark— astringent, antidysenteric, anti- speptic, antiscorbutic. Bark paste applied externally to articular and muscular rheumatism. Root—used for regulating menstruation.

The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia ofIn- dia recommends stem bark in haem- orrhagic diseases.

The fruit contains beta-amyrin, olea- nolic acid and amino acids—glycine, cystine, serine, alanine and leucine; polysaccharides are also present.

Aerial parts gave lignoceric acid, 24-methylenecycloartanone, stigmast- 4-en-3-one, beta-sitosterol and its glu- coside.

Dosage: Stem bark—5-10 g powder for decoction (API, Vol. II); 1-3 g powder (API, Vol. III).... Indian Medicinal Plants