Precision | Health Dictionary

1 The quality of being sharply defined or stated. One measure of precision is the number of distinguishable alternatives from which a measurement was selected, sometimes indicated by the number of significant digits in the measurement. Another measure of precision is the standard error of measurement, the standard deviation of a series of replicate determinations of the same quantity. Precision does not imply accuracy. 2 In statistics, precision is defined as the inverse of the variance of a measurement or estimate.


Precision | Health Dictionary

Keywords of this word: Precision


Medical Dictionary

In general, any factor that distorts the true nature of an event or observation. In clinical observations, a bias is any systematic factor other than the intervention of interest that affects the magnitude of an observed difference (i.e. trends to increase or decrease) in the outcomes of a treatment group and control group. Bias diminishes the accuracy (though not necessarily the precision) of an observation. Randomization is a technique used to decrease this form of bias. Bias also refers to a prejudiced or partial viewpoint that would affect someone’s interpretation of a problem. Double-blinding is a technique used to decrease this type of bias. See “blinding”.... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

The conduct of very intricate surgical operations using specially re?ned operating microscopes (see MICROSCOPE) and miniaturised precision instruments – for example, forceps, scalpels, scissors, etc. Microsurgery is used in previously inaccessible areas of the brain, eye, inner ear and spinal cord, as well as in the suturing of severed nerves and small blood vessels following traumatic injuries to the limbs or ?ngers. The technique is also used to reverse VASECTOMY.... Medical Dictionary

Community Health

The tendency for the estimated magnitude of a parameter (e.g. based upon the average of a sample of observations of a treatment or intervention effect) to deviate randomly from the true magnitude of that parameter. Random variation is independent of the effects of systematic biases. In general, the larger the sample size, the lower the random variation of the estimate of a parameter. As random variation decreases, precision increases.... Community Health