Keywords of this word: Pregnant


Beneficial Teas

Abuta tea is a complex type of tea, used at first only by midwives to treat different childbirth issues. Now, it is widely-appreciated due to its therapeutic value. About Abuta Tea Abuta is a high-climbing vine, originating from South Africa and being widely known for its efficiency in treating women’s ailments. The plant has woody stems and extremely long roots. Its leaves are heart-shaped and have a waxy texture. The seeds are flat, the flowers grow in panicles, whereas its fruits are bright red, turning black when they are ripened. Practitioners of nowadays medicine have been acknowledged using derivatives of some of the constituents of abuta to block neuromuscular activity during surgery. Extracts of the same plant are included in pharmaceutical products for medical applications. Abuta tea gained its reputation as the brew used by midwives, especially in South America. It is thought to help fighting hemorrhage that may threaten a miscarriage. In Indian Ayurvedic medicine, Abuta tea is believed to have anti-fertility properties. Brewing Abuta Tea Abuta tea can be intaken in the form of capsules or tincture. It can be brewed in the following way:
  • boil the dried roots of the plant ( 20 to 25 minutes)
  • allow the mix to steep (5 minutes)
  • drink it slowly
Abuta Tea benefits Abuta Teais successfully used to:
  • fight kidney stones and bladder infections
  • alleviate fever
  • counter jaundice
  • ease symptoms of arthritis and rheumatism
  • fight gonorrhea
  • treat anemia
Abuta tea is given to women to help ease childbirth. It is also efficient in alleviating the unpleasant menstrual problems. Abuta Tea side effects High doses ofAbuta teacombined with other medications, may lead to respiratory problems. It is not recommended to pregnant or breastfeeding women. Abuta tea is benefic to treat a large array of diseases, being also recommended as an excellent blood depurative.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

The cause of Addison’s disease (also called chronic adrenal insu?ciency and hypocortisolism) is a de?ciency of the adrenocortical hormones CORTISOL, ALDOSTERONE and androgens (see ANDROGEN) due to destruction of the adrenal cortex (see ADRENAL GLANDS). It occurs in about 1 in 25,000 of the population. In the past, destruction of the adrenal cortex was due to TUBERCULOSIS (TB), but nowadays fewer than 20 per cent of patients have TB while 70 per cent su?er from autoimmune damage. Rare causes of Addison’s disease include metastases (see METASTASIS) from CARCINOMA, usually of the bronchus; granulomata (see GRANULOMA); and HAEMOCHROMATOSIS. It can also occur as a result of surgery for cancer of the PITUITARY GLAND destroying the cells which produce ACTH (ADRENOCORTICOTROPHIC HORMONE)

– the hormone which provokes the adrenal cortex into action.

Symptoms The clinical symptoms appear slowly and depend upon the severity of the underlying disease process. The patient usually complains of appetite and weight loss, nausea, weakness and fatigue. The skin becomes pigmented due to the increased production of ACTH. Faintness, especially on standing, is due to postural HYPOTENSION secondary to aldosterone de?ciency. Women lose their axillary hair and both sexes are liable to develop mental symptoms such as DEPRESSION. Acute episodes – Addisonian crises – may occur, brought on by infection, injury or other stressful events; they are caused by a fall in aldosterone levels, leading to abnormal loss of sodium and water via the kidneys, dehydration, low blood pressure and confusion. Patients may develop increased tanning of the skin from extra pigmentation, with black or blue discoloration of the skin, lips, mouth, rectum and vagina occurring. ANOREXIA, nausea and vomiting are common and the su?erer may feel cold.

Diagnosis This depends on demonstrating impaired serum levels of cortisol and inability of these levels to rise after an injection of ACTH.

Treatment consists in replacement of the de?cient hormones. HYDROCORTISONE tablets are commonly used; some patients also require the salt-retaining hormone, ?udrocortisone. Treatment enables them to lead a completely normal life and to enjoy a normal life expectancy. Before surgery, or if the patient is pregnant and unable to take tablets, injectable hydrocortisone may be needed. Rarely, treated patients may have a crisis, perhaps because they have not been taking their medication or have been vomiting it. Emergency resuscitation is needed with ?uids, salt and sugar. Because of this, all patients should carry a card detailing their condition and necessary management. Treatment of any complicating infections such as tuberculosis is essential. Sometimes DIABETES MELLITUS coexists with Addison’s disease and must be treated.

Secondary adrenal insu?ciency may occur in panhypopituitarism (see PITUITARY GLAND), in patients treated with CORTICOSTEROIDS or after such patients have stopped treatment.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Agrimony tea is widely known for its therapeutical properties and healthy contribution in healing several diseases. It is successfully used in popular medicine since the Elizabethan age, and is considered to cure a large array of medical problems. Agrimony Tea description Agrimony is a dark green plant, from the rose family, originating from the temperate regions of Europe, Canada and US. It possesses a distinctive scent, usually compared to apricots, but slightly bitter. In the Elizabethan era, herbalists largely used Agrimony due to its beneficent properties as a medicine. Agrimony tea is the infusion made from the abovementioned plant, valued for its antioxidant and astringent properties. Brewing Agrimony Tea To prepare Agrimony Tea:
  • Take 1 or 2 teaspoons of dried Agrimony leaves and flowers, for each cup of boiling water
  • Let it rest for 10 to 15 minutes
  • Cool and strain
The resulting tea has a nice amber color and a slight bitter taste. Agrimony tea can be consumed three times a day, sweetened with licorice or honey. Agrimony Tea benefits Agrimony tea is widely known for its antioxidant and diuretic properties, but also for:
  • fighting inflammations
  • acting against viral infections
  • treating kidney diseases and related bladder disorders
  • aiding difficult digestions
  • improving the liver function
  • treating diarrhea both in adult and in child cases
  • helping in cases of excess vaginal discharges
  • fighting against rheumatism and arthritis
  • curing mild coughs and sore throats
Externally, Agrimony tea can be used as astringent for wounds, for washing the eyes in order to treat conjunctivitis and as gargle and mouth rinse. Agrimony Tea side effects Agrimony tea is not recommended to be drunk in case of blood pressure medication intake. Pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers should avoid this tea due to its influence on menstruation. There have been acknowledged instances in which Agrimony tea caused digestive problems, aggravating constipation. Agrimony tea is a healthy type of tea, recommended to people looking for a balanced diet and a mood enhancer.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

Acquired Immune De?ciency Syndrome (AIDS) is the clinical manifestation of infection with Human Immunode?ciency Virus (HIV). HIV belongs to the retroviruses, which in turn belong to the lentiviruses (characterised by slow onset of disease). There are two main HIV strains: HIV-1, by far the commonest; and HIV-2, which is prevalent in Western Africa (including Ivory Coast, Gambia, Mali, Nigeria and Sierra Leone). HIV attacks the human immune system (see IMMUNITY) so that the infected person becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections, such as TUBERCULOSIS, PNEUMONIA, DIARRHOEA, MENINGITIS and tumours such as KAPOSI’S SARCOMA. AIDS is thus the disease syndrome associated with advanced HIV infection.

Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 are predominantly sexually transmitted and both are associated with secondary opportunistic infections. However, HIV-2 seems to result in slower damage to the immune system. HIV-1 is known to mutate rapidly and has given rise to other subtypes.

HIV is thought to have occurred in humans in the 1950s, but whether or not it infected humans from another primate species is uncertain. It became widespread in the 1970s but its latency in causing symptoms meant that the epidemic was not noticed until the following decade. Although it is a sexually transmitted disease, it can also be transmitted by intravenous drug use (through sharing an infected needle), blood transfusions with infected blood (hence the importance of e?ective national blood-screening programmes), organ donation, and occupationally (see health-care workers, below). Babies born of HIV-positive mothers can be infected before or during birth, or through breast feeding.

Although HIV is most likely to occur in blood, semen or vaginal ?uid, it has been found in saliva and tears (but not sweat); however, there is no evidence that the virus can be transmitted from these two body ?uids. There is also no evidence that HIV can be transmitted by biting insects (such as mosquitoes). HIV does not survive well in the environment and is rapidly destroyed through drying.

Prevalence At the end of 2003 an estimated 42 million people globally were infected with HIV – up from 40 million two years earlier. About one-third of those with HIV/AIDS are aged 15–24 and most are unaware that they are carrying the virus. During 2003 it is estimated that 5 million adults and children worldwide were newly infected with HIV, and that 3 million adults and children died. In Africa in 2003,

3.4 million people were newly infected and 2.3 million died, with more than 28 million carrying the virus. HIV/AIDS was the leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa where over half of the infections were in women and 90 per cent of cases resulted from heterosexual sex. In some southern African countries, one in three pregnant women had HIV.

In Asia and the Paci?c there were 1.2 million new infections and 435,000 deaths. The area with the fastest-growing epidemic is Eastern Europe, especially the Russian Federation where in 2002 around a million people had HIV and there were an estimated 250,000 new infections, with intravenous drug use a key contributor to this ?gure. Seventy-?ve per cent of cases occurred in men, with male-to-male sexual transmission an important cause of infection, though heterosexual activity is a rising cause of infection.

At the end of 2002 the UK had an estimated 55,900 HIV-infected adults aged between 15 and 59. More than 3,600 individuals were newly diagnosed with the infection in 2000, the highest annual ?gure since the epidemic started

– in 1998 the ?gure was 2,817 and in 1999 just over 3,000 (Department of Health and Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre). The incidence of AIDS in the UK has declined sharply since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and HIV-related deaths have also fallen: in 2002 there were 777 reported new AIDS cases and 395 deaths, compared with 1,769 and 1,719 respectively in 1995. (Sources: UNAIDS and WHO, AIDS Epidemic Update, December 2001; Public Health Laboratory Services AIDS and STD Centre Communicable Disease Surveillance and Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health, Quarterly Surveillance Tables.)

Poverty is strongly linked to the spread of AIDS, for various reasons including lack of health education; lack of e?ective public-health awareness; women having little control over sexual behaviour and contraception; and, by comparison with the developed world, little or no access to antiretroviral drugs.

Pathogenesis The cellular target of HIV infection is a subset of white blood cells called T-lymphocytes (see LYMPHOCYTE) which carry the CD4 surface receptor. These so-called ‘helper T-cells’ are vital to the function of cell-mediated immunity. Infection of these cells leads to their destruction (HIV replicates at an enormous rate – 109) and over the course of several years the body is unable to generate suf?cient new cells to keep pace. This leads to progressive destruction of the body’s immune capabilities, evidenced clinically by the development of opportunistic infection and unusual tumours.

Monitoring of clinical progression It is possible to measure the number of viral particles present in the plasma. This gives an accurate guide to the likely progression rate, which will be slow in those individuals with fewer than 10,000 particles per ml of plasma but progressively more rapid above this ?gure. The main clinical monitoring of the immune system is through the numbers of CD4 lymphocytes in the blood. The normal count is around 850 cells per ml and, without treatment, eventual progression to AIDS is likely in those individuals whose CD4 count falls below 500 per ml. Opportunistic infections occur most frequently when the count falls below 200 per ml: most such infections are treatable, and death is only likely when the CD4 count falls below 50 cells per ml when infection is developed with organisms that are di?cult to treat because of their low intrinsic virulence.

Simple, cheap and highly accurate tests are available to detect HIV antibodies in the serum. These normally occur within three months of infection and remain the cornerstone of the diagnosis.

Clinical features Most infected individuals have a viral illness some three weeks after contact with HIV. The clinical features are often non-speci?c and remain undiagnosed but include a ?ne red rash, large lymph nodes, an in?uenza-like illness, cerebral involvement and sometimes the development of opportunistic infections. The antibody test may be negative at this stage but there are usually high levels of virus particles in the blood. The antibody test is virtually always positive within three months of infection. HIV infection is often subsequently asymptomatic for a period of ten years or more, although in most patients progressive immune destruction is occurring during this time and a variety of minor opportunistic infections such as HERPES ZOSTER or oral thrush (see CANDIDA) do occur. In addition, generalised LYMPHADENOPATHY is present in a third of patients and some su?er from severe malaise, weight loss, night sweats, mild fever, ANAEMIA or easy bruising due to THROMBOCYTOPENIA.

The presentation of opportunistic infection is highly variable but usually involves either the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the gastrointestinal tract or the LUNGS. Patients may present with a sudden onset of a neurological de?cit or EPILEPSY due to a sudden onset of a STROKE-like syndrome, or epilepsy due to a space-occupying lesion in the brain – most commonly TOXOPLASMOSIS. In late disease, HIV infection of the central nervous system itself may produce progressive memory loss, impaired concentration and mental slowness called AIDS DEMENTIA. A wide variety of opportunistic PROTOZOA or viruses produces DYSPHAGIA, DIARRHOEA and wasting. In the respiratory system the commonest opportunistic infection associated with AIDS, pneumonia, produces severe shortness of breath and sometimes CYANOSIS, usually with a striking lack of clinical signs in the chest.

In very late HIV infection, when the CD4 count has fallen below 50 cells per ml, infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS may produce progressive retinal necrosis (see EYE, DISORDERS OF) which will lead to blindness if untreated, as well as a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms. At this stage, infection with atypical mycobacteria is also common, producing severe anaemia, wasting and fevers. The commonest tumour associated with HIV is Kaposi’s sarcoma which produces purplish skin lesions. This and nonHodgkin’s lymphoma (see LYMPHOMA), which is a hundred times more frequent among HIV-positive individuals than in the general population, are likely to be associated with or caused by opportunistic viral infections.

Prevention There is, as yet, no vaccine to prevent HIV infection. Vaccine development has been hampered

by the large number of new HIV strains generated through frequent mutation and recombination.

because HIV can be transmitted as free virus and in infected cells.

because HIV infects helper T-cells – the very cells involved in the immune response. There are, however, numerous research pro

grammes underway to develop vaccines that are either prophylactic or therapeutic. Vaccine-development strategies have included: recombinant-vector vaccines, in which a live bacterium or virus is genetically modi?ed to carry one or more of the HIV genes; subunit vaccines, consisting of small regions of the HIV genome designed to induce an immune response without infection; modi?ed live HIV, which has had its disease-promoting genes removed; and DNA vaccines – small loops of DNA (plasmids) containing viral genes – that make the host cells produce non-infectious viral proteins which, in turn, trigger an immune response and prime the immune system against future infection with real virus.

In the absence of an e?ective vaccine, preventing exposure remains the chief strategy in reducing the spread of HIV. Used properly, condoms are an extremely e?ective method of preventing exposure to HIV during sexual intercourse and remain the most important public-health approach to countering the further acceleration of the AIDS epidemic. The spermicide nonoxynol-9, which is often included with condoms, is known to kill HIV in vitro; however, its e?ectiveness in preventing HIV infection during intercourse is not known.

Public-health strategies must be focused on avoiding high-risk behaviour and, particularly in developing countries, empowering women to have more control over their lives, both economically and socially. In many of the poorer regions of the world, women are economically dependent on men and refusing sex, or insisting on condom use, even when they know their partners are HIV positive, is not a straightforward option. Poverty also forces many women into the sex industry where they are at greater risk of infection.

Cultural problems in gaining acceptance for universal condom-use by men in some developing countries suggests that other preventive strategies should also be considered. Microbicides used as vaginal sprays or ‘chemical condoms’ have the potential to give women more direct control over their exposure risk, and research is underway to develop suitable products.

Epidemiological studies suggest that male circumcision may o?er some protection against HIV infection, although more research is needed before this can be an established public-health strategy. Globally, about 70 per cent of infected men have acquired the virus through unprotected vaginal sex; in these men, infection is likely to have occurred through the penis with the mucosal epithelia of the inner surface of the foreskin and the frenulum considered the most likely sites for infection. It is suggested that in circumcised men, the glans may become keratinised and thus less likely to facilitate infection. Circumcision may also reduce the risk of lesions caused by other sexually transmitted disease.

Treatment AIDS/HIV treatment can be categorised as speci?c therapies for the individual opportunistic infections – which ultimately cause death – and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) designed to reduce viral load and replication. HAART is also the most e?ective way of preventing opportunistic infections, and has had a signi?cant impact in delaying the onset of AIDS in HIV-positive individuals in developed countries.

Four classes of drugs are currently in use. Nucleoside analogues, including ZIDOVUDINE and DIDANOSINE, interfere with the activity of the unique enzyme of the retrovirus reverse transcriptase which is essential for replication. Nucleotide analogues, such as tenofovir, act in the same way but require no intracellular activation. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as nevirapine and EFAVIRENZ, act by a di?erent mechanism on the same enzyme. The most potent single agents against HIV are the protease inhibitors, such as lopinavir, which render a unique viral enzyme ineffective. These drugs are used in a variety of combinations in an attempt to reduce the plasma HIV viral load to below detectable limits, which is achieved in approximately 90 per cent of patients who have not previously received therapy. This usually also produces a profound rise in CD4 count. It is likely, however, that such treatments need to be lifelong – and since they are associated with toxicities, long-term adherence is di?cult. Thus the optimum time for treatment intervention remains controversial, with some clinicians believing that this should be governed by the viral load rising above 10,000 copies, and others that it should primarily be designed to prevent the development of opportunistic infections – thus, that initiation of therapy should be guided more by the CD4 count.

It should be noted that the drug regimens have been devised for infection with HIV-1; it is not known how e?ective they are at treating infection with HIV-2.

HIV and pregnancy An HIV-positive woman can transmit the virus to her fetus, with the risk of infection being particularly high during parturition; however, the risk of perinatal HIV transmission can be reduced by antiviral drug therapy. In the UK, HIV testing is available to all women as part of antenatal care. The bene?ts of antenatal HIV testing in countries where antiviral drugs are not available are questionable. An HIV-positive woman might be advised not to breast feed because of the risks of transmitting HIV via breastmilk, but there may be a greater risk associated with not breast feeding at all. Babies in many poor communities are thought to be at high risk of infectious diseases and malnutrition if they are not breast fed and may thus be at greater overall risk of death during infancy.

Counselling Con?dential counselling is an essential part of AIDS management, both in terms of supporting the psychological wellbeing of the individual and in dealing with issues such as family relations, sexual partners and implications for employment (e.g. for health-care workers). Counsellors must be particularly sensitive to culture and lifestyle issues. Counselling is essential both before an HIV test is taken and when the results are revealed.

Health-care workers Health-care workers may be at risk of occupational exposure to HIV, either through undertaking invasive procedures or through accidental exposure to infected blood from a contaminated needle (needlestick injury). Needlestick injuries are frequent in health care – as many as 600,000 to 800,000 are thought to occur annually in the United States. Transmission is much more likely where the worker has been exposed to HIV through a needlestick injury or deep cut with a contaminated instrument than through exposure of mucous membranes to contaminated blood or body ?uids. However, even where exposure occurs through a needlestick injury, the risk of seroconversion is much lower than with a similar exposure to hepatitis C or hepatitis B. A percutaneous exposure to HIV-infected blood in a health-care setting is thought to carry a risk of about one infection per 300 injuries (one in 1,000 for mucous-membrane exposure), compared with one in 30 for hepatitis C, and one in three for hepatitis B (when the source patient is e-antigen positive).

In the event of an injury, health-care workers are advised to report the incident immediately where, depending on a risk assessment, they may be o?ered post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). They should also wash the contaminated area with soap and water (but without scrubbing) and, if appropriate, encourage bleeding at the site of injury. PEP, using a combination of antiretroviral drugs (in a similar regimen to HAART – see above), is thought to greatly reduce the chances of seroconversion; it should be commenced as soon as possible, preferably within one or two hours of the injury. Although PEP is available, safe systems of work are considered to o?er the greatest protection. Double-gloving (latex gloves remove much of the blood from the surface of the needle during a needlestick), correct use of sharps containers (for used needles and instruments), avoiding the resheathing of used needles, reduction in the number of blood samples taken from a patient, safer-needle devices (such as needles that self-blunt after use) and needleless drug administration are all thought to reduce the risk of exposure to HIV and other blood-borne viruses. Although there have been numerous cases of health-care workers developing HIV through occupational exposure, there is little evidence of health-care workers passing HIV to their patients through normal medical procedures.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Albizia tea is largely-spread worldwide and it provides plenty of health benefits to consumers. It is mainly recommended to patients suffering from ailments afflicting the nerve and brain. Albizia Tea description Albizia is a genus of more than 150 species of trees, occurring in large areas of the world, but mainly in the Old World tropics. It is regarded as an invasive species, growing in dry plains and sandy valleys. The parts considered to have healthy properties are the flowers and the bark. The heads of the Albizia flower are said to have sedative and tonic properties, whereas the bark has proven a stimulant and diuretic action. In ancient traditional Chinese literature, the use of the Albizia herb was related to promoting joy, assuaging sorrow and brightening the eyes. Albizia tea is made from dried blossoms of the abovementioned plant. Albizia Tea brewing To prepare Albizia tea:
  • steep the dried blossoms in a 12-gram cup of hot water (5 minutes)
  • alternatively, place a teaspoon of dried Albizia herb powder in newly-boiled water and similarly steep for about 5 minutes
  • drink the tea slowly
Albizia Tea benefits Albizia tea has proved its efficiencyin:
  • fighting insomnia
  • improving the mood, uplifting the spirit and fighting depression, melancholy and anxiety
  • fighting irritability
  • strengthening mental health
  • relieving stress
  • relieving tightness in the chest
Albizia Tea side effects Albizia tea may interfere with other drugs that one intakes. Before drinking Albizia tea, consumers should consider consulting a licensed health care provider to avoid any possible inconvenience. However, Albizia is not recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women, because there is little scientific evidence that it does not harm the baby. Albizia tea is a healthy type of tea, extensively used to treat insomnia and improve the mood, but it is also recommended to consumers willing to strengthen their mental health.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A colourless liquid, also called ethanol or ethyl-alcohol, produced by the fermentation of carbohydrates by yeast. Medically, alcohol is used as a solvent and an antiseptic; recreationally it is a widely used drug, taken in alcoholic drinks to give a pleasant taste as well as to relax, reduce inhibitions, and increase sociability. Taken to excess, alcohol causes much mental and physical harm – not just to the individual imbibing it, but often to their family, friends, community and work colleagues.

Alcohol depresses the central nervous system and disturbs both mental and physical functioning. Even small doses of alcohol will slow a person’s re?exes and concentration; potentially dangerous e?ects when, for example, driving or operating machinery. Drunkenness causes slurred speech, muddled thinking, amnesia (memory loss), drowsiness, erectile IMPOTENCE, poor coordination and dulled reactions – thereby making driving or operating machinery especially dangerous. Disinhibition may lead to extreme euphoria, irritability, misery or aggression, depending on the underlying mood at the start of drinking. Severe intoxication may lead to COMA and respiratory failure.

Persistent alcohol misuse leads to physical, mental, social and occupational problems, as well as to a risk of DEPENDENCE (see also ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE). Misuse may follow several patterns: regular but controlled heavy intake, ‘binge’ drinking, and dependence (alcoholism). The ?rst pattern usually leads to mainly physical problems such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, liver disease, heart disease and impotence. The second is most common among young men and usually leads to mainly social and occupational problems – getting into ?ghts, jeopardising personal relationships, overspending on alcohol at weekends, and missing days o? work because of hangovers. The third pattern – alcohol dependence – is the most serious, and can severely disrupt health and social stability.

Many researchers consider alcohol dependence to be an illness that runs in families, with a genetic component which is probably passed on as a vulnerable personality. But it is hard to disentangle genetic, environmental and social factors in such families. In the UK there are estimated to be around a million people su?ering from alcohol dependence and a similar number who have di?culty controlling their consumption (together about 1:30 of the population).

Alcohol causes tolerance and both physical and psychological dependence (see DEPENDENCE for de?nitions). Dependent drinkers classically drink early in the morning to relieve overnight withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms include anxiety, restlessness, nausea and vomiting, and tremor. Sudden withdrawal from regular heavy drinking can lead to life-threatening delirium tremens (DTs), with severe tremor, hallucinations (often visual – seeing spiders and monsters, rather than the pink elephants of romantic myth), and CONVULSIONS. This must be treated urgently with sedative drugs, preferably by intravenous drip. Similar symptoms, plus severe INCOORDINATION and double-vision, can occur in WERNICKE’S ENCEPHALOPATHY, a serious neurological condition due to lack of the B vitamin thiamine (whose absorption from the stomach is markedly reduced by alcohol). If not treated urgently with injections of thiamine and other vitamins, this can lead to an irreversible form of brain damage called Korsako?’s psychosis, with severe amnesia. Finally, prolonged alcohol misuse can cause a form of dementia.

In addition to these severe neurological disorders, the wide range of life-threatening problems caused by heavy drinking includes HEPATITIS, liver CIRRHOSIS, pancreatitis (see PANCREAS, DISEASES OF), gastrointestinal haemorrhage, suicide and FETAL ALCOHOL SYNDROME; pregnant women should not drink alcohol as this syndrome may occur with more than a glass of wine or half-pint of beer a day. The social e?ects of alcohol misuse – such as marital breakdown, family violence and severe debt – can be equally devastating.

Treatment of alcohol-related problems is only moderately successful. First, many of the physical problems are treated in the short term by doctors who fail to spot, or never ask about, heavy drinking. Second, attempts at treating alcohol dependence by detoxi?cation or ‘drying out’ (substituting a tranquillising drug for alcohol and withdrawing it gradually over about a week) are not always followed-up by adequate support at home, so that drinking starts again. Home support by community alcohol teams comprising doctors, nurses, social workers and, when appropriate, probation o?cers is a recent development that may have better results. Many drinkers ?nd the voluntary organisation Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and its related groups for relatives (Al-Anon) and teenagers (Alateen) helpful because total abstinence from alcohol is encouraged by intensive psychological and social support from fellow ex-drinkers.

Useful contacts are: Alcoholics Anonymous; Al-Anon Family Groups UK and Eire (including Alateen); Alcohol Concern; Alcohol Focus Scotland; and Alcohol and Substance Misuse.

1 standard drink =1 unit

=••• pint of beer

=1 measure of spirits

=1 glass of sherry or vermouth

=1 glass of wine

Limits within which alcohol is believed not to cause long-term health risks:... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Alfalfa tea is known for more than 2000 years and its benefits are shown by recent studies to be good in treating ailments such as kidney stones or arthritis. Alfalfa: the plant and the tea Alfalfa, literally meaning “the father of plants”, is also known as lucerne, holy-hay or trefoil. It has a high nutritional content, and is best known for possessing A, B, C, D, E and K vitamins. This plant has been originally used only as horse feed, but due to its nutritional benefits its usage has been extended to human consumption too. It proved to be a good soil fertilizer, especially a plant growth regulator. As part of the human diet, at first, it was used to promote appetite and stop bleeding, but further studies have revealed many other health benefits. Alfalfa tea is the beverage resulting from brewing the dried herbs. Brewing Alfalfa Tea To make Alfalfa tea:
  • take the dried leaves
  • soak them in boiling water
  • steep them for 10 to 15 minutes (depending on the quantity and flavor preferences)
Consumers described the taste of the resulting Alfalfa tea as refreshing and pleasant to drink. For medicinal purposes, it is advisable to have 5,000 to 10,000 mg of alfalfa leaves steeped three times a day. Another efficient way of intaking Alfalfa is through herbal supplements, like tablets or capsules. Alfalfa Tea benefits Alfalfa tea is successfully used to:
  • lower cholesterol levels
  • help keep calcium in bones and out of artery linings
  • help lower blood sugar levels
  • help in treatment of upset stomach
  • alleviate kidney and bladder woes
  • stimulate the immune system
  • purify the blood
  • carry intestinal waste out of the body
  • reduce cancer risks
Alfalfa Tea side effects Studies have shown that consuming Alfalfa tea, especially in high doses,could have side effects, such as: breaking down red blood cells, aggravating or even causing symptoms similar to systemic lupus erythematosus disease (SLE). The abovementioned tea is not recommended to pregnant or nursing women, and its administration is not advisable to children suffering from diabetes or autoimmune disease. Alfalfa tea is a modern cure for a large array of diseases. It is also largely used as cattle food, due to its nutritional content.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Allspice tea is well known for its healing properties and, it proved to be an important ingredient when cooking stews, soups but not only. Allspice Tea description The Allspice plant was discovered by Christopher Columbus on a Jamaican island, in 1494. The Spaniards called it “pimienta” (pepper) and started to use it widely when cooking. It is a small berry, tasting like a mixture of pepper, cloves, juniper, nutmeg and cinnamon. Nowadays, this plant is added to recipes and brewes in order to obtain a healing beverage. Due to its taste, Allspice is commonly used to flavor stews and soups. Rice dishes become tastier when this spice is added. Allspice tea is best known for its aid in digestive processes but not only. Allspice Tea brewing To prepare Allspice tea:
  • place 1 or 2 teaspoons of dried allspice fruit (or powder) in 1 cup of boiling water
  • steep them for 10 to 20 minutes
  • drink the tea (sugar or honey might be added)
Allspice Tea benefits Allspice tea is said to:
  • facilitate and promote good digestion
  • help bloating, belching and flatulence
  • help in preventing allergies
  • help lower blood sugar
  • help relieve toothache and muscle/joint pain
  • help uplift the mood and relax the body
Allspice Tea side effects Breastfeeding mothers and pregnant women must not take allspice in any form. Allspice tea may cause serious allergic reactions in hypersensitive individuals. It is contraindicated for those with chronic gastrointestinal conditions such as duodenal ulcers, reflux disease, spastic colitis, diverticulitis, disarticulates and ulcerative colitis. It should not be consumed by patients with cancer. Also, allspice tea should not be intaken by people with a high risk of cancer. Discovered by Christopher Columbus, allspice plant was firstused in cooking recipes and afterwards, the resulting beverage turned out to be a useful aid in treating several ailments. Allspice tea is a good choice to treat oneself and to strengthen the body.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A diagnostic procedure for detecting abnormalities of the FETUS. Usually carried out between the 16th and 18th week of pregnancy, amniocentesis is performed by piercing the amniotic sac in the pregnant UTERUS with a hollow needle and withdrawing a sample of AMNIOTIC FLUID for laboratory analysis. As well as checking for the presence of abnormal fetal cells, the procedure can show the sex of the fetus. The risk of early rupture of the fetal membranes or of miscarriage is low (around 0.5 per cent).... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

The insertion of a viewing instrument (amnioscope) through the abdominal wall into the pregnant UTERUS to examine the inside of the amniotic sac (see AMNION). The growing FETUS can be viewed directly and its condition and sex assessed without disturbing the pregnancy. The amniotic sac may also be viewed late in pregnancy through the cervix or neck of the womb using an instrument called the fetoscope.... Medical Dictionary

Dictionary of Tropical Medicine

The condition characterised by inadequate red blood cells and/or HAEMOGLOBIN in the BLOOD. It is considered to exist if haemoglobin levels are below 13 grams per 100 ml in males and below 12 grams per 100 ml in adult nonpregnant women. No simple classi?cation of anaemia can be wholly accurate, but the most useful method is to divide anaemias into: (a) microcytic hypochromic or iron de?ciency anaemia; (b) megaloblastic hyperchromic anaemia; (c) aplastic anaemia; (d) haemolytic anaemia; (e) inherited anaemias (see below).

In Britain, anaemia is much more common among women than men. Thus, around 10 per cent of girls have anaemia at the age of 15, whilst in adult life the incidence is over 30 per cent between the ages of 30 and 40, around 20 per cent at 50, and around 30 per cent at 70. Among men the incidence is under 5 per cent until the age of 50; it then rises to 20 per cent at the age of 70. Ninety per cent of all cases of anaemia in Britain are microcytic, 7 per cent are macrocytic, and 3 per cent are haemolytic or aplastic. Inherited anaemias include sickle-cell anaemia and THALASSAEMIA.... Dictionary of Tropical Medicine

Beneficial Teas

Anamu tea is largely known for its healing properties, especially anti-cancer. It is also used in religious rituals and to repel insects, due to its garlic-like odor. Anamu Tea description Anamu is a perennial shrub, growing especially in America. Its roots and leaves give off a pungent odor reminiscent of garlic, due to which the plant is also known as “garlic weed”. Its flowers and roots have been used as a medical remedy for diverse ailments affecting the digestive and urinary tract. Early inhabitants of the American continent used anamu to treat themselves from snakebites and arrow poisoning. Anamu tea, the beverage resulting from brewing the abovementioned plant, is one of the most used medicinal herbs in South and Central America, known for its anti-cancer and sedative properties, but not only. Anamu Tea brewing To prepare Anamu tea:
  • Place about 30 grams of the dried anamu plant in one liter of boiling water
  • Let it boil for about 15 minutes
  • Take it out of the heat
  • Let the mix steep for 7 minutes
  • Drink it slowly
 ¼ cup may be intaken three times a day. Anamu powder tablet and capsules are also good to enjoy this plant’s benefits. Anamu Tea benefits Anamu tea is known to:
  • lower the risk of developing tumors and cancer
  • help fight inflammations that cause many different kinds of pain such as arthritis, rheumatism and headaches
  • help strengthen the immune system by killing viruses, bacteria, candida and fungi
  • help fight diabetes by lowering blood sugar levels
  • help reduce fever and flu
  • help sedate the nervous system
  • fight anxiety
  • help in detoxification by promoting urination, as well as perspiration
  • help promote menstruation
  • help fight congestion-related problems such as cough, colds and sinusitis
  • help ease muscle spasms
Anamu Tea side effects Anamu tea is not recommended to pregnant women. Studies revealed that the intake may cause contractions and afterwards, miscarriages. Patients suffering from blood disorders should ask their physicians before consuming Anamu tea because it has been discovered that it has a blood thinning effect on the body. Complications were noticed for people with hypoglycemia. Anamu tea is a healthy beverage, which may successfully enhance immunity, kill cancer cells or reduce pain. It is a good choice for people looking to improve their daily diet.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Andrographis Tea is well known for its bitter taste, as well as for its healthy benefits. It has proven to be an adjuvant in treating severe illness such as hepatitis, due to its high content of antioxidants. Andrographis Tea description Andrographis is originating from Asia, being used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine. The plant is easy to grow: its propagation is by seeds, planted during spring and summer. Andrographis grows both in full sun or shade, developing vigorously in moist conditions. The herb has been proved to treat infectious diseases. This fact was discovered during the global flu epidemic of 1919, known as one of the most destructive infectious to outbreak in history, which killed millions worldwide, in many countries. Andrographis Tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the andrographis plant. It is widely known for its bitter taste as well as for its adjuvant properties against flu, depression, digestion complaints, but not only. Andrographis Tea brewing To brew Andrographis tea:
  • place 1 teaspoon of dried andrographis in a tea infuser (10 grams of fresh leaves)
  • place the infuser in a tea cup
  • cover it with 1 cup of boiling water
  • steep the tea for 10 minutes
  • drink it slowly
The resulting tea has an extreme bitter taste. Another possibility of enjoying the benefits of Andrographis tea is to intake capsules containing the plant. Andrographis Tea benefits Andrographis Tea has many proven benefits, such as:
  • Treating gastrointestinal complains
  • Treating throat infections
  • Dispelling toxins
  • Increasing biliary flow
  • Treating coughs, headaches, edema
  • Treating pain conditions, inflammation
  • Treating arthritis, rheumatism
  • Treating constipation
  • Treating pneumonia, tuberculosis, leprosy, hepatitis, herpes, diabetes, bronchitis
Andrographis Tea side effects It has been showed that Andrographis Tea should not be used by pregnant and nursing women or by children. It has been also noticed that large doses of Andrographis Tea may lead to infertility. Andrographis Tea is a healthy beverage which has the ability to strengthen the immune system, stop cancer cells from multiplying, and also render a good physical state. It can be consumed as tea or medicinal pills.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Anise tea is largely used both for culinary and medicinal purposes. It is an important ingredient in the pharmaceutical industry, proving itself useful in enhancing the supply of mother’s milk, but not only. Anise Tea description Anise is a sweet and strong-fragranced plant, known for its star-shaped fruits, harvested just before they ripen. It belongs to the same plant family as carrots, fennel and caraway. Due to its licorice flavor, it is usually added to candies, drinks and food. Anise could be added to mouthwashes and toothpastes, mainly to those found in the natural food stores. Anise tea is the resulting beverage from brewing this plant. Anise Tea brewing To brew Anise tea:
  • Boil 1 1/2 cups of water with anise seeds
  • Boil 1 1/2 cups of water (in another pot)
  • Add the tea bags
  • Steep them both (10 minutes)
  • Strain anise water into the pot containing tea
  • Pour into serving cups
Lemon and honey may be added (depending on the consumer›s taste). Anise Tea benefits Anise tea is a popular beverage, especially in the Middle East, where it is used to sooth a stomachache or to relieve intestinal gas. It can be administrated even to children. Anise tea has proven its efficiency in dealing with:
  • the overall treatment of such respiratory ailments as colds, pneumonia, bronchitis and sinusitis
  • an upset stomach and flatulence
  • the treatment of colic
  • loosen phlegm in the throat and lungs
  • hiccups
Anise Tea side effects Anise tea is not recommended to pregnant and breast-feeding women. Rarely, Anise tea can cause allergic reactions. Consumers should watch for signs of rash, hives or swelling of the tongue, throat, lips or face. If any of these symptoms occur, stop using anise and ask your health care provider. Anise tea is a healthy choice for a balanced diet.This tea is best known as an adjuvant in the digestive processes and also, as an aid for respiratory problems.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

The protocol which doctors and midwives follow to ensure that the pregnant mother and her FETUS are kept in good health, and that the pregnancy and birth have a satisfactory outcome. The pregnant mother is seen regularly at a clinic where, for example, her blood pressure is checked, the growth and development of her child-to-be are carefully assessed, and any problem or potential problems dealt with. Most antenatal care deals with normal pregnancies and is supervised by general practitioners and midwives in primary-care clinics. If any serious problems are identi?ed, the mother can be referred to specialists’ clinics in hospitals. (See PREGNANCY AND LABOUR.)... Medical Dictionary

Indian Medicinal Plants

Lam.

Synonym: A. bracteata Retz.

Family: Aristolochiaceae.

Habitat: Uttar Pradesh, Bengal, Madhya Pradesh and western peninsular India.

English: Bracteated Birthwort.

Ayurvedic: Kitamaari, Dhumrapa- traa, Naakuli.

Unani: Kiraamaar.

Siddha/Tamil: Aadutheendaappaalai, Kattusuragam.

Action: Oxytocic, abortifacient, emmenagogue.

Leaves and fruit contain ceryl alcohol, aristolochic acid and beta-sitos- terol. Aristolochic acid is insecticidal, poisonous, nephrotoxic. Leaf juice— vermifuge. Seeds—strong purgative. Products containing aristolochic acid are banned in the U.S., Canada, Great Britain, European countries and Japan.

The seed compounds, aristolochic acid and magnoflorine, induce contractions in the isolated uterus of pregnant rat and stimulate the isolated ileum of guinea pig. They also activate the muscarinic and serotoner- gic receptors in a variety of organs. Magnoflorine decreases arterial blood pressure in rabbits, and induces hypothermia in mice.

See also A. longa.... Indian Medicinal Plants

Beneficial Teas

Artichoke leaf tea is one of oldest natural remedies valued by Egyptians. Nowadays, it is largely used to treat ailments like constipation, indigestion or liver disorders, but not only. Artichoke leaf tea description Artichoke is a perennial thistle plant originating from the Mediterranean areas of Southern Europe and North Africa. It has arching leaves which are deeply lobed. Artichoke usually blossoms from the end of spring up to the middle of summer. It is said to be one of the world’s oldest vegetables. People normally intake the fleshy portion of the artichoke leaves, its green base and its core. Artichoke leaf tea is the beverage resulting from brewing the leaves of the abovementioned plant. It is a caffeine-free substitute for those who want to avoid consuming coffee. Artichoke Leaf Tea brewing To prepare Artichoke leaf tea, consumers need a teapot, a strainer and a heatproof cup or mug:
  • Heat water in a teapot to about 208 degrees F (or bring the water to a boil)
  • Remove from heat for a minute or two
  • Pour water into your cup or mug
  • Immerse the tea bag (in case of loose-leaf tea, use a tea strainer)
  • Let it steep for four to five minutes (If you steep the tea longer, the flavor will be stronger, but the tea might taste bitter)
  • Remove the tea from the mug and serve it
  • Add milk and/or sugar to taste
Artichoke Leaf Tea benefits Studies have shown that Artichoke leaf tea is successfully used to:
  • lower bad cholesterol levels
  • lower the risks of cardiovascular diseases
  • promote good digestion by helping relieve constipation, heartburn, diarrhea and bloating
  • support the functions of the liver fighting against cirrhosis and other ailments of the liver
  • help lower blood sugar levels
  • help lower the risks for diabetes
  • help in the treatment of problems affecting the kidney
  • strengthen the immune system
  • eliminate toxins
  • clean the skin
Artichoke Leaf Tea side effects Artichoke leaf tea is not recommended for patients with gallstones. Pregnant and nursing women, as well as small children, should not intake it until further research is conducted. Artichoke leaf tea is a beverage with no caffeine content, used to help in treating a large array of diseases. Except its healthy properties, it can be a good alternative for an afternoon or evening tea.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Ashwagandha tea has a long medicinal history, being used for its healing properties byAyurveda practitioners, native Americans and Africans. At present, it is used to improve memory, but not only. What is Ashwagandha? Ashwagandha is a stout shrub that belongs to the nightshade family, but it does not possess poisonous properties.  It grows in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bangladesh. Literally translated, Ashwagandha means horse smell. It has been also known as “India’s ginseng” or “winter cherry.” In Ayurveda, practitioners use Ashwagandha for its medicinal properties which enhance longevity and health in general. Native Americans and Africans have been using Ashwagandha to heal inflammation, fevers and infection. The plant has anti-microbial and anti-bacterial properties. Ashwagandha can be taken as tea, as tincture, in capsule form, or as an extract. Ashwagandha tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Ashwagandha tea brewing To prepare Ashwagandha tea:
  • Place about 1 teaspoon of dried ashwagandha leaves in boiling water.
  • Let the mix steep for about 15 minutes and cool.
  • Strain and then drink.
Ashwagandha tea benefits Studies revealed that Ashwagandha tea is successfully used to:
  • calm the nerves and treat severe stress and nervous exhaustion
  • help in the treatment of hypertension
  • clear the mind, as well as to improve memory and cognitive abilities
  • help in fighting arthritis
  • help in restoring sexual vitality, especially in males
It also has anti-carcinogenic and anti-cancer properties. Ashwagandha tea is recommended for expectant mothers. It is said to purify the mother’s blood and strengthen her immune system. Because it acts as a uterine sedative, Ashwagandha tea is used during childbirth, bytraditional Ayurvedic medicine. Ashwagandha tea side effects Ashwagandha tea is not recommended to pregnant women. To avoid any possible side effects, consumers should not intake the tea in high doses or for long periods of time. Ashwagandha tea is a good choice when looking for an increased libido, or an adjuvant against cancer, due to its antioxidant content. It can be also used to enhance the immune system and thus, to release stress.... Beneficial Teas

Medicinal Plants

Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Low Protein: High Fat: Low Saturated fat: Low Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: Moderate Fiber: Moderate Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: Vitamin A, folate, vitamin C Major mineral contribution: Potassium, iron About the Nutrients in This Food Asparagus has some dietary fiber, vitamin A, and vitamin C. It is an excel- lent source of the B vitamin folate. A serving of four cooked asparagus spears (½ inch wide at the base) has 1.2 g dietary fiber, 604 IU vitamin A (26 percent of the R DA for a woman, 20 percent of the R DA for a man), 4.5 mg vitamin C (6 percent of the R DA for a woman, 5 percent of the R DA for a man), and 89 mcg folate (22 percent of the R DA). The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food Fresh, boiled and drained. Canned asparagus may have less than half the nutrients found in freshly cooked spears. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Low-sodium diet (canned asparagus) Buying This Food Look for: Bright green stalks. The tips should be purplish and tightly closed; the stalks should be firm. Asparagus is in season from March through August. Avoid: Wilted stalks and asparagus whose buds have opened. Storing This Food Store fresh asparagus in the refrigerator. To keep it as crisp as possible, wrap it in a damp paper towel and then put the whole package into a plastic bag. Keeping asparagus cool helps it hold onto its vitamins. At 32°F, asparagus will retain all its folic acid for at least two weeks and nearly 80 percent of its vitamin C for up to five days; at room temperature, it would lose up to 75 percent of its folic acid in three days and 50 percent of the vitamin C in 24 hours. Preparing This Food The white part of the fresh green asparagus stalk is woody and tasteless, so you can bend the stalk and snap it right at the line where the green begins to turn white. If the skin is very thick, peel it, but save the parings for soup stock. What Happens When You Cook This Food Chlorophyll, the pigment that makes green vegetables green, is sensitive to acids. When you heat asparagus, its chlorophyll will react chemically with acids in the asparagus or in the cooking water to form pheophytin, which is brown. As a result, cooked asparagus is olive-drab. You can prevent this chemical reaction by cooking the asparagus so quickly that there is no time for the chlorophyll to react with acids, or by cooking it in lots of water (which will dilute the acids), or by leaving the lid off the pot so that the volatile acids can float off into the air. Cooking also changes the texture of asparagus: water escapes from its cells and they collapse. Adding salt to the cooking liquid slows the loss of moisture. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Canning. The intense heat of can ning makes asparagus soft, robs it of its bright green color, and reduces the vitamin A, B, and C content by at least half. ( White asparagus, which is bleached to remove the green color, contains about 5 percent of the vitamin A in fresh asparagus.) With its liquid, can ned asparagus, green or white, contains about 90 times the sodium in fresh asparagus ( 348 mg in 3.5 oz. can ned against 4 mg in 3.5 oz. fresh boiled asparagus). Medical Uses and/or Benefits Lower risk of some birth defects. As many as two of every 1,000 babies born in the United States each year may have cleft palate or a neural tube (spinal cord) defect due to their moth- ers’ not having gotten adequate amounts of folate during pregnancy. The R DA for folate is 400 mcg for healthy adult men and women, 600 mcg for pregnant women, and 500 mcg for women who are nursing. Taking folate supplements before becoming pregnant and through the first two months of pregnancy reduces the risk of cleft palate; taking folate through the entire pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Lower risk of heart attack. In the spring of 1998, an analysis of data from the records for more than 80,000 women enrolled in the long-running Nurses’ Health Study at Harvard School of Public Health/Brigham and Woman’s Hospital, in Boston, demonstrated that a diet providing more than 400 mcg folate and 3 mg vitamin B6 daily, from either food or supplements, more than twice the current R DA for each, may reduce a woman’s risk of heart attack by almost 50 percent. Although men were not included in the analysis, the results are assumed to apply to them as well. However, data from a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December 2006 called this theory into question. Researchers at Tulane Univer- sity examined the results of 12 controlled studies in which 16,958 patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease were given either folic acid supplements or placebos (“look-alike” pills with no folic acid) for at least six months. The scientists, who found no reduction in the risk of further heart disease or overall death rates among those taking folic acid, concluded that further studies will be required to verify whether taking folic acid supplements reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Odorous urine. After eating asparagus, we all excrete the sulfur compound methyl mercap- tan, a smelly waste product, in our urine. Food/Drug Interactions Anticoagulants. Asparagus is high in vitamin K, a vitamin manufactured naturally by bac- teria in our intestines, an adequate supply of which enables blood to clot normally. Eating foods that contain this vitamin may interfere with the effectiveness of anticoagulants such as heparin and warfarin (Coumadin, Dicumarol, Panwarfin) whose job is to thin blood and dissolve clots.... Medicinal Plants

Medical Dictionary

(Further information about the subject and the terms used can be found at http:// www.hfea.gov.uk/glossary)

This technique is used when normal methods of attempted CONCEPTION or ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION with healthy SEMEN have failed. In the UK, assisted-conception procedures are governed by the Human Fertilisation & Embryology Act 1990, which set up the Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority (HFEA).

Human Fertilisation & Embryology Act 1990 UK legislation was prompted by the report on in vitro fertilisation produced by a government-appointed committee chaired by Baroness Warnock. This followed the birth, in 1978, of the ?rst ‘test-tube’ baby.

This Act allows regulation monitoring of all treatment centres to ensure that they carry out treatment and research responsibly. It covers any fertilisation that uses donated eggs or sperm (called gametes) – for example, donor insemination or embryos (see EMBRYO) grown outside the human body (known as licensed treatment). The Act also covers research on human embryos with especial emphasis on foolproof labelling and immaculate data collection.

Human Fertilisation & EmbryologyAuthority (HFEA) Set up by the UK government following the Warnock report, the Authority’s 221 members inspect and license centres carrying out fertilisation treatments using donated eggs and sperm. It publishes a code of practice advising centres on how to conduct their activities and maintains a register of information on donors, patients and all treatments. It also reviews routinely progress and research in fertility treatment and the attempted development of human CLONING. Cloning to produce viable embryos (reproductive cloning) is forbidden, but limited licensing of the technique is allowed in specialist centres to enable them to produce cells for medical treatment (therapeutic cloning).

In vitro fertilisation (IVF) In this technique, the female partner receives drugs to enhance OVULATION. Just before the eggs are released from the ovary (see OVARIES), several ripe eggs are collected under ULTRASOUND guidance or through a LAPAROSCOPE. The eggs are incubated with the prepared sperm. About 40 hours later, once the eggs are fertilised, two eggs (three in special circumstances) are transferred into the mother’s UTERUS via the cervix (neck of the womb). Pregnancy should then proceed normally. About one in ?ve IVF pregnancies results in the birth of a child. The success rate is lower in women over 40.

Indications In women with severely damaged FALLOPIAN TUBES, IVF o?ers the only chance of pregnancy. The method is also used in couples with unexplained infertility or with male-factor infertility (where sperms are abnormal or their count low). Women who have had an early or surgically induced MENOPAUSE can become pregnant using donor eggs. A quarter of these pregnancies are multiple – that is, produce twins or more. Twins and triplets are more likely to be premature. The main danger of ovarian stimulation for IVF is hyperstimulation which can cause ovarian cysts. (See OVARIES, DISEASES OF.)... Medical Dictionary

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Moderate Protein: Low Fat: High Saturated fat: High Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: Moderate Fiber: High to very high Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: Vitamins A, folate, vitamin C Major mineral contribution: Potassium About the Nutrients in This Food The avocado is an unusual fruit because about 16 percent of its total weight is fat, primarily monounsaturated fatty acids. Like many other fruits, avo- cados are high in fiber (the Florida avocado is very high in fiber), a good source of the B vitamin folate, vitamin C, and potassium. The edible part of half of one average size avocado (100 g/3.5 ounces) provides 6.7 g dietary fiber, 15 g fat (2.1 g saturated fat, 9.7 g monoun- saturated fat, 1.8 g polyunsaturated fat), 81 mcg folate (20 percent of the R DA), 20 mg vitamin C (26 percent of the R DA for a woman, 22 percent for a man), and 485 mg potassium (the equivalent of one eight-ounce cup of fresh orange juice). The edible part of one-half a Florida avocado (a.k.a. alligator pear) has eight grams dietary fiber, 13.5 g fat (2.65 g saturated fat), 81 mcg folate (41 percent of the R DA for a man, 45 percent of the R DA for a woman), 12 mg vitamin C (20 percent of the R DA), and 741 mg potassium, 50 percent more than one cup fresh orange juice. Diets That May Exclude or Restrict This Food Controlled-potassium diet Low-fat diet Buying This Food Look for: Fruit that feels heavy for its size. The avocados most commonly sold in the U.S. are the Hass—a purple-black bumpy fruit that accounts for 85 percent of the avocados shipped from California—and the smooth-skinned Florida avocado (“alligator pear”). The California Avocado Commission lists several more on its Web site (http://www.avocado. org/about/varieties): the oval, midwinter Bacon; the pear-shaped, late-fall Fuerte; the Gwen, a slightly larger Hass; Pinkerton, pear-shaped with a smaller seed; the round summer Reed; and the yellow-green, pear-shaped Zutano. Avoid: Avocados with soft dark spots on the skin that indicate damage underneath. Storing This Food Store hard, unripened avocados in a warm place; a bowl on top of the refrigerator will do. Avocados are shipped before they ripen, when the flesh is hard enough to resist bruising in transit, but they ripen off the tree and will soften nicely at home. Store soft, ripe avocados in the refrigerator to slow the natural enzyme action that turns their flesh brown as they mature even when the fruit has not been cut. Preparing This Food When you peel or slice an avocado, you tear its cell walls, releasing polyphenoloxidase, an enzyme that converts phenols in the avocado to brownish compounds that darken the avocado’s naturally pale green flesh. You can slow this reaction (but not stop it completely) by brushing the exposed surface of the avocado with an acid (lemon juice or vinegar). To store a cut avocado, brush it with lemon juice or vinegar, wrap it tightly in plastic, and keep it in the refrigerator—where it will eventually turn brown. Or you can store the avocado as guacamole; mixing it with lemon juice, tomatoes, onions, and mayonnaise (all of which are acidic) is an efficient way to protect the color of the fruit. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Lower risk of some birth defects. As many as two of every 1,000 babies born in the United States each year may have cleft palate or a neural tube (spinal cord) defect due to their moth- ers’ not having gotten adequate amounts of folate during pregnancy. The current R DA for folate is 180 mcg for a healthy woman and 200 mcg for a healthy man, but the FDA now recommends 400 mcg for a woman who is or may become pregnant. Taking folate supple- ments before becoming pregnant and through the first two months of pregnancy reduces the risk of cleft palate; taking folate through the entire pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Lower risk of heart attack. In the spring of 1998, an analysis of data from the records for more than 80,000 women enrolled in the long-running Nurses’ Health Study at Harvard School of Public Health/Brigham and Woman’s Hospital, in Boston, demonstrated that a diet providing more than 400 mcg folate and 3 mg vitamin B6 daily, from either food or supplements, more than twice the current R DA for each, may reduce a woman’s risk of heart attack by almost 50 percent. Although men were not included in the analysis, the results are assumed to apply to them as well. However, data from a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December 2006 called this theory into question. Researchers at Tulane Univer- sity examined the results of 12 controlled studies in which 16,958 patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease were given either folic acid supplements or placebos (“look-alike” pills with no folic acid) for at least six months. The scientists, who found no reduction in the risk of further heart disease or overall death rates among those taking folic acid, concluded that further studies will be required to ascertain whether taking folic acid supplements reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Lower levels of cholesterol. Avocados are rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat believed to reduce cholesterol levels. Potassium benefits. Because potassium is excreted in urine, potassium-rich foods are often recommended for people taking diuretics. In addition, a diet rich in potassium (from food) is associated with a lower risk of stroke. A 1998 Harvard School of Public Health analysis of data from the long-running Health Professionals Study shows 38 percent fewer strokes among men who ate nine servings of high potassium foods a day vs. those who ate less than four servings. Among men with high blood pressure, taking a daily 1,000 mg potas- sium supplement—about the amount of potassium in one avocado—reduced the incidence of stroke by 60 percent. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Latex-fruit syndrome. Latex is a milky fluid obtained from the rubber tree and used to make medical and surgical products such as condoms and protective latex gloves, as well as rubber bands, balloons, and toys; elastic used in clothing; pacifiers and baby-bottle nipples; chewing gum; and various adhesives. Some of the proteins in latex are allergenic, known to cause reactions ranging from mild to potentially life-threatening. Some of the pro- teins found naturally in latex also occur naturally in foods from plants such as avocados, bananas, chestnuts, kiwi fruit, tomatoes, and food and diet sodas sweetened with aspar- tame. Persons sensitive to these foods are likely to be sensitive to latex as well. NOT E : The National Institute of Health Sciences, in Japan, also lists the following foods as suspect: A lmonds, apples, apricots, bamboo shoots, bell peppers, buckwheat, cantaloupe, carrots, celer y, cherries, chestnuts, coconut, figs, grapefruit, lettuce, loquat, mangoes, mushrooms, mustard, nectarines, oranges, passion fruit, papaya, peaches, peanuts, peppermint, pine- apples, potatoes, soybeans, strawberries, walnuts, and watermelon. Food/Drug Interactions MAO inhibitors. Monoamine oxidase (M AO) inhibitors are drugs used as antidepressants or antihypertensives. They inhibit the action of enzymes that break down the amino acid tyramine so it can be eliminated from the body. Tyramine is a pressor amine, a chemical that constricts blood vessels and raises blood pressure. If you eat a food such as avocado that contains tyramine while you are taking an M AO inhibitor you cannot eliminate the pressor amine, and the result may be abnormally high blood pressure or a hypertensive crisis (sus- tained elevated blood pressure). False-positive test for tumors. Carcinoid tumors (which may arise from tissues in the endo- crine system, the intestines, or the lungs) secrete serotonin, a natural chemical that makes blood vessels expand or contract. Because serotonin is excreted in urine, these tumors are diagnosed by measuring the levels of serotonin by-products in the urine. Avocados contain large amounts of serotonin; eating them in the three days before a test for an endocrine tumor might produce a false-positive result, suggesting that you have the tumor when in fact you don’t. (Other foods high in serotonin are bananas, eggplant, pineapples, plums, tomatoes, and walnuts.)... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Beneficial Teas

Bai Hao Oolong Tea is a type of oolong tea, made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant. Although Oolong tea is known as a traditional Chinese tea, the Bai Hao Oolong tea is made in Taiwan. Find out more about the Bai Hao Oolong tea! About Bai Hao Oolong tea Bai Hao Oolong tea is a type of Oolong tea produced in Taiwan, in the Hsinchu County. In English, it means “white tip oolong tea”. It is also known by the name Dongfang meiren; in English, its name is translated as “oriental beauty tea”. It is also said that, at the beginning of the 20th century, a British tea merchant presented Queen Elizabeth II. After tasting it, she also called it “Oriental Beauty”, which became one of the tea’s well-known names. The name Bai Hao Oolong tea, translated as “white tip oolong tea”, refers to the leaves. Theyare dark purple or brown, while the tips have a white, silvery color. The Bai Hao Oolong tea has a sweet and fruity taste, while the color of the beverage is a beautiful bright reddish-orange. Production of Bai Hao Oolong tea The tea bushes that produce the leaves of Bai Hao Oolong tea are cultivated in Northern Taiwan. They are grown without using any kind of pesticide. This is to encourage the tea green leafhopper to feed on the leaves, stems, and buds in order to suck the phloem juice. The buds then turn white, as the plant becomes oxidized where it was bit. This is what gives the tea its unique, sweet flavor. In order to have the tea green leafhopper bite on the plants, it is necessary that the bushes producing Bai Hao Oolongtea leaves be cultivated in warmer areas. The tea bushes are planted in the northwestern part of the country, in lower altitude areas which have sufficient sunshine and humidity. It is harvested during mid-summer and then, it is fermented up to 70%. Only the bud and the top two leaves are used. How to prepare Bai Hao Oolong tea In order to prepare Bai Hao Oolong tea, use two grams of tea leaves for every 150 ml of water. The ideal water temperature is around 80°C-85°C, while the steeping time is of 1-2 minutes. The Bai Hao Oolongtea leaves can be used for more than one brewing, though you have to gradually increase steeping time. Benefits of Bai Hao Oolong tea Oolong teas are good for our health, and the Bai Hao Oolong tea is not an exception. Read more about some health benefits of the Bai Hao Oolong tea. First, the polyphenols in its composition help you to lose weight. They increase the function of the enzymes which are responsible with burning fat. That’s why it’s a good idea to drink cups of Bai Hao Oolong teaif you’re on a diet. Bai Hao Oolong tea also contains fluoride, which helps you maintain a good oral hygiene. It helps protect your teeth as it prevents the decaying of teeth and stops the plaque build-up. Overall, it makes your teeth stronger. The polyphenols in the Bai Hao Oolong tea also help treat skin problems such as eczema and rashes. Other skin problems can be treated with Bai Hao Oolong tea, as well. The antioxidants in its composition fight against the free radicals affecting your skin. Some of the skin benefits include reducing the dark spots and wrinkles, slowing down the aging process, and improving the color of the skin. They also help protect you against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Drinking Bai Hao Oolong tea also helps reduce high blood pressure and blood sugar levels. It is especially good for diabetes patients, who can keep the blood glucose level under control. Lastly,Bai Hao Oolong teais also helpful when it comes to increasing energy, reducing stress and improving brain power. Side effects of Bai Hao Oolong tea While there are many health benefits when drinking Bai Hao Oolong tea, don’t forget that there are a few side effects, as well. One is related to the caffeine found in the Bai Hao Oolong tea. Although the amount is less than in most types of black tea, you still have to be careful if caffeine isn’t good for your body. Be careful not to get the following symptoms: insomnia, anxiety, headache, dizziness, irritability, and blurred vision. Also, pregnant women have to reduce the amount of tea they drink, as the caffeine may cause miscarriages and birth defects. It can also affect the child during breast feeding. It’s important not to drink too much tea either, including Bai Hao Oolong tea. IT is generally recommended that you not drink more than six cups of tea a day. General symptoms that may appear when drinking too much tea are loss of appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, headaches, dizziness, insomnia, and irregular heartbeats. Also, it was discovered that, among elderly people, excessive amount of Bai Hao Oolong tea can cause hypokalemia. The Bai Hao Oolong tea is a richly-flavored, fruity tea that also keeps you healthy. If you decide to include it in your daily diet, you surely won’t regret it.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Banaba Tea is a healthy beverage, well known for its ability to fight against diabetes and also kidney ailments. Banaba Tea description Banaba is a medicinal plant used as a natural remedy to treat diabetes. It has dark green leaves that are oblong. During autumn, leaves, acknowledged to be abundant in vitamins and minerals and rich in dietary fibers, turn to an orange-red color. Traditional uses include an infusion from the leaves as a treatment for hyperglycemia. The blood sugar lowering effect of Banaba leaf extract is similar to that of insulin. Banaba tea is normally found in the Philippines and Japan, being an extract from the herb’s plant. Banaba brewing To brew Banaba tea:
  • Bring 400 milliliters (1 and 1/2 cups or 12 ounces) water to a strong boil.
  • Reduce heat to low and drop in a tea bag.
  • Keep at or below a simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Evaporation will leave about 250 milliliters (1 cup or 8 ounces) of tea.
  • Pour fresh brewed tea into a cup and drink while it is still warm.
  • Save the tea bag. You should reuse each tea bag up to four times to achieve effective results.
It is advisable to take the tea before meals: 1 or 2 cups daily. In case of tincture intaking, 2-3 ml is the recommended daily dose (2 - 3 full droppers daily). Banaba Tea benefits Studies have proved that Banaba tea is successfully used to:
  • fight against diabetes by helping control blood sugar levels
  • control blood cholesterol levels
  • lower blood pressure
  • help urinary system related ailments
  • help in the treatment of diarrhea
  • help in the treatment of constipation
  • help reducing the absorption of carbohydrates, aiding the weight loss efforts
  • help in the treatment of gout
  • help in lowering uric acid levels
Banaba Tea side effects Banana tea is not recommended to children, pregnant women and nursing mothers. Patients suffering from diabetes should be cautious when using Banaba tea in combination with other hypoglycemic drugs. Banaba tea could be a healthy alternative to traditional drugs treating diabetes or kidney diseases, but not only.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Barberry tea is well known inAsia, Europe, Africa and America due to its medicinal properties. Nowadays, it is consumed worldwide as tincture, fluid extract or capsules. Barberry tea description Barberry is a shrub growing in gray-colored and tight thorny hedges, producing yellow flowers during spring and red berries in autumn. Its roots, bark and berries have been used for more than 2,500 years for a variety of health-promoting purposes. In ancient Egypt, barberry was mixed with fennel to fight plague. Nowadays, Barberry is available in the form of capsules, fluid extract and tincture. Barberry Tea is made of the dried roots and berries of barberry. Barberry tea brewing To prepare Barberry tea: steep 1 to 2 teaspoons of dried barberry root or 1 to 2 teaspoons of whole (or crushed berries) in about 2/3 of a cup of hot water for 10 to 15 minutes. Barberry Tea can be consumed three times, daily. Barberry tea benefits Barberry tea has proven its efficiency in treating:
  • inflammation due to bacterial ear, nose and throat infection
  • bacterial and viral forms of diarrhea
  • psoriasis
  • the function of the gallbladder
  • urinary tract infection
  • heartburn
  • candida
  • epilepsy
Barberry Tea may help stabilize blood pressure and normalize heart rhythm. Also, it has been claimed that Barberry Tea may help strengthen the immune system. Barberry tea side effects Studies conducted so far showed that Barberry tea should not be used beyond seven consecutive days, in order to avoid complications on excessive use of barberry. There have been cases when Barberry tea interacted with anti-coagulants, blood pressure medication and antibiotics, causing side effects. Pregnant, nursing women, and nursing infants also should avoid drinking this tea. Barberry tea is a medicinal beverage, effective in treating respiratory and urinary tract infections, as well as hypertension, diarrhea and gallbladder disease.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Barley tea is widely consumed due to its medicinal properties. It fights effectively against several types of cancer, due to its high content of antioxidants. Barley Tea description Barley is a self-pollinating annual plant, member of the grass family. It grows to a height of 1 to 4 feet, being able to withstand various growing conditions. It is found in grasslands, woodlands, disturbed habitats, roadsides and orchards. The grass of barley is acknowledged to be a source of fiber, vitamins, minerals, and amino acids and it also has a high content of antioxidants. In traditional Chinese medicine, Barley grass has been prescribed to fight diseases of the spleen or poor digestion. It has also been effectively used to treat depression or emotional imbalance. Barley tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. This is a very common and appreciated drink in many parts of Asia including Japan, China, Malaysia and Singapore. Barley tea is popular in Japanese and Korean cuisine: the barley grass is often roasted and then stewed in hot water. It is also intaken as a caffeine-free coffee substitute in American cuisine. It is traditionally used for detoxification, to improve digestion and for urinary tract infections. Barley Tea brewing Barley tea is available in loose grains, tea bags or already prepared tea drinks. It is usually made by briefly simmering roasted barley grains. The resulting beverage has a toasty taste, with slight bitter undertones. Barley tea is best consumed hot, though some report that room temperature and even cold barley water is still effective. Barley Tea benefits Studies conducted so far showed that Barley tea is effective in treating:
  • certain forms of cancer
  • digestion
  • prostate
  • sleep disorder
Barley tea is believed to help relieving early symptoms of colds, acting as a daily nutritional supplement and successfully cleansing the body of toxins. This tea may help improve blood sugar levels and also reduce bad cholesterol levels. Barley Tea side effects Barley tea is not recommended for nursing and pregnant women because it may stop lactation. Barley tea is a healthy alternative to caffeine drinks and people choose it daily to replace the first mentioned beverage.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Basil tea is an Ayurvedic natural remedy used to treat a wide variety of diseases such as asthma, diabetes and high cholesterol. Hindus worship the plant for its religious significance as well. Basil Tea description Basil, a plant from the mint family, is original from India and Asia. It is an aromatic herb with a strong fragrance being largely used in spaghetti sauces, stews and tomato recipes. Basil is a source of vitamins and other nutrients.  Studies showed that this herb has anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory health properties, fighting against intestinal problems, headaches and ulcers, as well. In aromatherapy, basil is used to alleviate mental fatigue. Basil tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Basil Tea brewing To prepare Basil tea:
  • bring the water and the basil leaves to boil (in a small tea pan)
  • lower the heat and allow it to brew for 3-4 minutes
  • add the tea leaves or tea bags and sugar according to taste
  • bring to boil
  • turn off the heat
  • strain it into cups and add milk according to taste
Basil Tea benefits Studies claimed that Basil Tea is successesfully used to:
  • treat intestinal colics, gastric ulcers and bloating/swelling of the abdomen
  • treat anorexia
  • fight urinary tract infections
  • help against diarrhea
  • help fight insomnia
  • help treat lesions and inflammations in the mouth
  • enhance the body’s ability to resist stress
  • help to relieve pain
Basil Tea side effects Basil tea side effects are generally associated to large intakes. There have been thus noticed:shallow breathing, blood in the urine or sputum, mouth and throat burns, nausea, racing heartbeat, seizures, dizziness and coma. Pregnant or breastfeeding women, as well as women trying to become pregnant should not use Basil tea. Basil tea has anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties, proving itself to be an important adjuvant in treating arthritis, fevers and other ailments. It is also constantly used to add savor to several dishes.... Beneficial Teas

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

See also Beans. Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Low Protein: High Fat: Low Saturated fat: Low Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: High Fiber: Moderate Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: B vitamins, folate, vitamin C Major mineral contribution: Iron, potassium About the Nutrients in This Food Because beans use stored starches and sugars to produce green shoots called sprouts, sprouted beans have less carbohydrate than the beans from which they grow. But bean sprouts are a good source of dietary fiber, including insoluble cellulose and lignin in leaf parts and soluble pectins and gums in the bean. The sprouts are also high in the B vitamin folate and vitamin C. One-half cup raw mung bean sprouts has 1.2 mg dietary fiber, 31.5 mcg folate (8 percent of the R DA), and 7 mg vitamin C (9 percent of the R DA for a woman, 7 percent of the R DA for a man). Raw beans contain anti-nutrient chemicals that inhibit the enzymes we use to digest proteins and starches; hemagglutinins (substances that make red blood cells clump together); and “factors” that may inactivate vita- min A. These chemicals are usually destroyed when the beans are heated. with the bean must be cooked before serving. Sprouted beans served The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food Cooked (see Adverse effects associated with this food ). Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Low-fiber, low-residue diet Buying This Food Look for: Fresh, crisp sprouts. The tips should be moist and tender. (The shorter the sprout, the more tender it will be.) It is sometimes difficult to judge bean sprouts packed in plastic bags, but you can see through to tell if the tip of the sprout looks fresh. Sprouts sold from water-filled bowls should be refrigerated, protected from dirt and debris, and served with a spoon or tongs, not scooped up by hands. Avoid: Mushy sprouts (they may be decayed) and soft ones (they have lost moisture and vitamin C). Storing This Food Refrigerate sprouts in a plastic bag to keep them moist and crisp. If you bought them in a plastic bag, take them out and repack them in bags large enough that they do not crush each other. To get the most vitamin C, use the sprouts within a few days. Preparing This Food R inse the sprouts thoroughly under cold running water to get rid of dirt and sand. Discard any soft or browned sprouts, then cut off the roots and cook the sprouts. Do not tear or cut the sprouts until you are ready to use them. When you slice into the sprouts, you tear cells, releasing enzymes that begin to destroy vitamin C. What Happens When You Cook This Food Cooking destroys some of the heat-sensitive vitamin C in sprouts. To save it, steam the sprouts quickly, stir-fry them, or add them uncooked just before you serve the dish. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Canning. Vitamin C is heat-sensitive, and heating the sprouts during the canning process reduces their vitamin C content. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Lower risk of some birth defects. As many as t wo of ever y 1,000 babies born in the United States each year may have cleft palate or a neural tube (spinal cord) defect due to their mothers’ not having gotten adequate amounts of folate during pregnancy. The R DA for folate is 400 mcg for healthy adult men and women, 600 mcg for pregnant women, and 500 mcg for women who are nursing. Taking folate supplements before becoming pregnant and continuing through the first t wo months of pregnancy reduces the risk of cleft palate; taking folate through the entire pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Lower risk of heart attack. In the spring of 1998, an analysis of data from the records for more than 80,000 women enrolled in the long-running Nurses’ Health Study at Harvard School of Public Health/Brigham and Woman’s Hospital, in Boston, demonstrated that a diet provid- ing more than 400 mcg folate and 3 mg vitamin B6 daily, from either food or supplements, more than twice the current R DA for each, may reduce a woman’s risk of heart attack by almost 50 percent. Although men were not included in the analysis, the results are assumed to apply to them as well. However, data from a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December 2006 called this theory into question. Researchers at Tulane University examined the results of 12 controlled studies in which 16,958 patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease were given either folic acid supplements or placebos (“look-alike” pills with no folic acid) for at least six months. The scientists, who found no reduction in the risk of further heart disease or overall death rates among those taking folic acid, concluded that further studies will be required to verif y whether taking folic acid supplements reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Food poisoning: Reacting to an outbreak of Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 food poisoning associated with eating raw alfalfa sprouts, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warn- ing in 1998 and again in summer 1999, cautioning those at high risk of food-borne illness not to eat any raw sprouts. The high-risk group includes children, older adults, and people with a weakened immune system (for example, those who are HIV-positive or undergoing cancer chemotherapy). Tests conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1999 sug- gest that irradiating raw sprouts and bathing them in an antiseptic solution at the processing plant may eliminate disease organisms and prolong the vegetable’s shelf life; this remains to be proven.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

(Black beans, chickpeas, kidney beans, navy beans, white beans) See also Bean sprouts, Lentils, Lima beans, Peas, Soybeans. Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Moderate Protein: High Fat: Low Saturated fat: Low Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: High Fiber: Very high Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: Vitamin B6, folate Major mineral contribution: Iron, magnesium, zinc About the Nutrients in This Food Beans are seeds, high in complex carbohydrates including starch and dietary fiber. They have indigestible sugars (stachyose and raffinose), plus insoluble cellulose and lignin in the seed covering and soluble gums and pectins in the bean. The proteins in beans are limited in the essential amino acids methionine and cystine.* All beans are a good source of the B vitamin folate, and iron. One-half cup canned kidney beans has 7.5 g dietary fiber, 65 mcg folate (15 percent of the R DA), and 1.6 mg iron (11 percent of the R DA for a woman, 20 percent of the R DA for a man). Raw beans contain antinutrient chemicals that inactivate enzymes required to digest proteins and carbohydrates. They also contain factors that inactivate vitamin A and also hemagglutinins, substances that make red blood cells clump together. Cooking beans disarms the enzyme inhibi- tors and the anti-vitamin A factors, but not the hemagglutinins. However, the amount of hemagglutinins in the beans is so small that it has no mea- surable effect in your body. * Soybeans are t he only beans t hat contain proteins considered “complete” because t hey contain sufficient amounts of all t he essent ial amino acids. The Folate Content of ½ Cup Cooked Dried Beans
  Bean   Folate (mcg)
Black beans 129
Chickpeas 191
Kidney beans canned 65
Navy beans 128
Pinto beans 147
  Source: USDA Nut rient Database: w w w.nal.usda.gov/fnic/cgibin /nut _search.pl, Nutritive Value of Foods, Home and Gardens Bullet in No. 72 (USDA, 1989). The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food Cooked, to destroy antinutrients. With grains. The proteins in grains are deficient in the essential amino acids lysine and isoleucine but contain sufficient tryptophan, methionine, and cystine; the proteins in beans are exactly the opposite. Together, these foods provide “complete” proteins. With an iron-rich food (meat) or with a vitamin C-rich food (tomatoes). Both enhance your body’s ability to use the iron in the beans. The meat makes your stomach more acid (acid favors iron absorption); the vitamin C may convert the ferric iron in beans into ferrous iron, which is more easily absorbed by the body. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Low-calcium diet Low-fiber diet Low-purine (antigout) diet Buying This Food Look for: Smooth-skinned, uniformly sized, evenly colored beans that are free of stones and debris. The good news about beans sold in plastic bags is that the transparent material gives you a chance to see the beans inside; the bad news is that pyridoxine and pyridoxal, the natural forms of vitamin B6, are very sensitive to light. Avoid: Beans sold in bulk. Some B vitamins, such as vitamin B6 (pyridoxine and pyridoxal), are very sensitive to light. In addition, open bins allow insects into the beans, indicated by tiny holes showing where the bug has burrowed into or through the bean. If you choose to buy in bulk, be sure to check for smooth skinned, uniformly sized, evenly colored beans free of holes, stones, and other debris. Storing This Food Store beans in air- and moistureproof containers in a cool, dark cabinet where they are pro- tected from heat, light, and insects. Preparing This Food Wash dried beans and pick them over carefully, discarding damaged or withered beans and any that float. (Only withered beans are light enough to float in water.) Cover the beans with water, bring them to a boil, and then set them aside to soak. When you are ready to use the beans, discard the water in which beans have been soaked. Some of the indigestible sugars in the beans that cause intestinal gas when you eat the beans will leach out into the water, making the beans less “gassy.” What Happens When You Cook This Food When beans are cooked in liquid, their cells absorb water, swell, and eventually rupture, releasing the pectins and gums and nutrients inside. In addition, cooking destroys antinutri- ents in beans, making them more nutritious and safe to eat. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Canning. The heat of canning destroys some of the B vitamins in the beans. Vitamin B is water-soluble. You can recover all the lost B vitamins simply by using the liquid in the can, but the liquid also contains the indigestible sugars that cause intestinal gas when you eat beans. Preprocessing. Preprocessed dried beans have already been soaked. They take less time to cook but are lower in B vitamins. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Lower risk of some birth defects. As many as two of every 1,000 babies born in the United States each year may have cleft palate or a neural tube (spinal cord) defect due to their moth- ers’ not having gotten adequate amounts of folate during pregnancy. The current R DA for folate is 180 mcg for a woman and 200 mcg for a man, but the FDA now recommends 400 mcg for a woman who is or may become pregnant. Taking a folate supplement before becoming pregnant and continuing through the first two months of pregnancy reduces the risk of cleft palate; taking folate through the entire pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Lower risk of heart attack. In the spring of 1998, an analysis of data from the records for more than 80,000 women enrolled in the long-run ning Nurses Health Study at Har vard School of Public Health/ Brigham and Woman’s Hospital in Boston demonstrated that a diet providing more than 400 mcg folate and 3 mg vitamin B6 a day from either food or supple- ments, more than t wice the current R DA for each, may reduce a woman’s risk of heart attack by almost 50 percent. A lthough men were not included in the analysis, the results are assumed to apply to them as well. NOT E : Beans are high in B6 as well as folate. Fruit, green leaf y vegetables, whole grains, meat, fish, poultr y, and shellfish are good sources of vitamin B6. To reduce the levels of serum cholesterol. The gums and pectins in dried beans and peas appear to lower blood levels of cholesterol. Currently there are two theories to explain how this may happen. The first theory is that the pectins in the beans form a gel in your stomach that sops up fats and keeps them from being absorbed by your body. The second is that bacteria in the gut feed on the bean fiber, producing short-chain fatty acids that inhibit the production of cholesterol in your liver. As a source of carbohydrates for people with diabetes. Beans are digested very slowly, produc- ing only a gradual rise in blood-sugar levels. As a result, the body needs less insulin to control blood sugar after eating beans than after eating some other high-carbohydrate foods (such as bread or potato). In studies at the University of Kentucky, a bean, whole-grain, vegetable, and fruit-rich diet developed at the University of Toronto enabled patients with type 1 dia- betes (who do not produce any insulin themselves) to cut their daily insulin intake by 38 percent. Patients with type 2 diabetes (who can produce some insulin) were able to reduce their insulin injections by 98 percent. This diet is in line with the nutritional guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, but people with diabetes should always consult with their doctors and/or dietitians before altering their diet. As a diet aid. Although beans are high in calories, they are also high in bulk (fiber); even a small serving can make you feel full. And, because they are insulin-sparing, they delay the rise in insulin levels that makes us feel hungry again soon after eating. Research at the University of Toronto suggests the insulin-sparing effect may last for several hours after you eat the beans, perhaps until after the next meal. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Intestinal gas. All legumes (beans and peas) contain raffinose and stachyose, complex sug- ars that human beings cannot digest. The sugars sit in the gut and are fermented by intestinal bacteria which then produce gas that distends the intestines and makes us uncomfortable. You can lessen this effect by covering the beans with water, bringing them to a boil for three to five minutes, and then setting them aside to soak for four to six hours so that the indigestible sugars leach out in the soaking water, which can be discarded. Alternatively, you may soak the beans for four hours in nine cups of water for every cup of beans, discard the soaking water, and add new water as your recipe directs. Then cook the beans; drain them before serving. Production of uric acid. Purines are the natural metabolic by-products of protein metabo- lism in the body. They eventually break down into uric acid, sharp cr ystals that may concentrate in joints, a condition known as gout. If uric acid cr ystals collect in the urine, the result may be kidney stones. Eating dried beans, which are rich in proteins, may raise the concentration of purines in your body. Although controlling the amount of purines in the diet does not significantly affect the course of gout (which is treated with allopurinol, a drug that prevents the formation of uric acid cr ystals), limiting these foods is still part of many gout regimens. Food/Drug Interactions Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are drugs used to treat depression. They inactivate naturally occurring enzymes in your body that metabolize tyramine, a substance found in many fermented or aged foods. Tyramine constricts blood vessels and increases blood pressure. If you eat a food containing tyramine while you are taking an M AO inhibitor, you cannot effectively eliminate the tyramine from your body. The result may be a hypertensive crisis. Some nutrition guides list dried beans as a food to avoid while using M AO inhibitors.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Moderate Protein: High Fat: Moderate Saturated fat: High Cholesterol: Moderate Carbohydrates: None Fiber: None Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: B vitamins Major mineral contribution: Iron, phosphorus, zinc About the Nutrients in This Food Like fish, pork, poultry, milk, and eggs, beef has high-quality proteins, with sufficient amounts of all the essential amino acids. Beef fat is slightly more highly saturated than pork fat, but less saturated than lamb fat. All have about the same amount of cholesterol per serving. Beef is an excellent source of B vitamins, including niacin, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12, which is found only in animal foods. Lean beef pro- vides heme iron, the organic iron that is about five times more useful to the body than nonheme iron, the inorganic form of iron found in plant foods. Beef is also an excellent source of zinc. One four-ounce serving of lean broiled sirloin steak has nine grams fat (3.5 g saturated fat), 101 mg cholesterol, 34 g protein, and 3.81 mg iron (21 percent of the R DA for a woman, 46 percent of the R DA for a man). One four-ounce serving of lean roast beef has 16 g fat (6.6 g saturated fat), 92 mg cholesterol, and 2.96 mg iron (16 percent of the R DA for a woman, 37 percent of the R DA for a man). The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food With a food rich in vitamin C. Ascorbic acid increases the absorption of iron from meat. * These values apply to lean cooked beef. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Controlled-fat, low-cholesterol diet Low-protein diet (for some forms of kidney disease) Buying This Food Look for: Fresh, red beef. The fat should be white, not yellow. Choose lean cuts of beef with as little internal marbling (streaks of fat) as possible. The leanest cuts are flank steak and round steak; rib steaks, brisket, and chuck have the most fat. USDA grading, which is determined by the maturity of the animal and marbling in meat, is also a guide to fat content. U.S. prime has more marbling than U.S. choice, which has more marbling than U.S. good. All are equally nutritious; the difference is how tender they are, which depends on how much fat is present. Choose the cut of meat that is right for your recipe. Generally, the cuts from the cen- ter of the animal’s back—the rib, the T-Bone, the porterhouse steaks—are the most tender. They can be cooked by dry heat—broiling, roasting, pan-frying. Cuts from around the legs, the underbelly, and the neck—the shank, the brisket, the round—contain muscles used for movement. They must be tenderized by stewing or boiling, the long, moist cooking methods that break down the connective tissue that makes meat tough. Storing This Food Refrigerate raw beef immediately, carefully wrapped to prevent its drippings from contami- nating other foods. Refrigeration prolongs the freshness of beef by slowing the natural multi- plication of bacteria on the meat surface. Unchecked, these bacteria will convert proteins and other substances on the surface of the meat to a slimy film and change meat’s sulfur-contain- ing amino acids methionine and cystine into smelly chemicals called mercaptans. When the mercaptans combine with myoglobin, they produce the greenish pigment that gives spoiled meat its characteristic unpleasant appearance. Fresh ground beef, with many surfaces where bacteria can live, should be used within 24 to 48 hours. Other cuts of beef may stay fresh in the refrigerator for three to five days. Preparing This Food Trim the beef carefully. By judiciously cutting away all visible fat you can significantly reduce the amount of fat and cholesterol in each serving. When you are done, clean all utensils thoroughly with soap and hot water. Wash your cutting board, wood or plastic, with hot water, soap, and a bleach-and-water solution. For ultimate safety in preventing the transfer of microorganisms from the raw meat to other foods, keep one cutting board exclusively for raw meats, fish, and poultry, and a second one for everything else. Finally, don’t forget to wash your hands. What Happens When You Cook This Food Cooking changes the appearance and flavor of beef, alters nutritional value, makes it safer, and extends its shelf life. Browning meat after you cook it does not “seal in the juices,” but it does change the fla- vor by caramelizing sugars on the surface. Because beef’s only sugars are the small amounts of glycogen in the muscles, we add sugars in marinades or basting liquids that may also con- tain acids (vinegar, lemon juice, wine) to break down muscle fibers and tenderize the meat. (Browning has one minor nutritional drawback. It breaks amino acids on the surface of the meat into smaller compounds that are no longer useful proteins.) When beef is cooked, it loses water and shrinks. Its pigments, which combine with oxygen, are denatured (broken into fragments) by the heat and turn brown, the natural color of well-done meat. At the same time, the fats in the beef are oxidized. Oxidized fats, whether formed in cooking or when the cooked meat is stored in the refrigerator, give cooked meat a character- istic warmed-over flavor. Cooking and storing meat under a blanket of antioxidants—catsup or a gravy made of tomatoes, peppers, and other vitamin C-rich vegetables—reduces the oxidation of fats and the intensity of warmed-over flavor. Meat reheated in a microwave oven also has less warmed-over flavor. An obvious nutritional benefit of cooking is the fact that heat lowers the fat content of beef by liquif ying the fat so it can run off the meat. One concrete example of how well this works comes from a comparison of the fat content in regular and extra-lean ground beef. According to research at the University of Missouri in 1985, both kinds of beef lose mass when cooked, but the lean beef loses water and the regular beef loses fat and cholesterol. Thus, while regular raw ground beef has about three times as much fat (by weight) as raw ground extra-lean beef, their fat varies by only 5 percent after broiling. To reduce the amount of fat in ground beef, heat the beef in a pan until it browns. Then put the beef in a colander, and pour one cup of warm water over the beef. Repeat with a second cup of warm water to rinse away fat melted by heating the beef. Use the ground beef in sauce and other dishes that do not require it to hold together. Finally, cooking makes beef safer by killing Salmonella and other organisms in the meat. As a result, cooking also serves as a natural preservative. According to the USDA, large pieces of fresh beef can be refrigerated for two or three days, then cooked and held safely for another day or two because the heat of cooking has reduced the number of bacteria on the surface of the meat and temporarily interrupted the natural cycle of deterioration. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Aging. Hanging fresh meat exposed to the air, in a refrigerated room, reduces the moisture content and shrinks the meat slightly. As the meat ages enzymes break down muscle pro- teins, “tenderizing” the beef. Canning. Canned beef does not develop a warmed-over flavor because the high tempera- tures in canning food and the long cooking process alter proteins in the meat so that they act as antioxidants. Once the can is open, however, the meat should be protected from oxygen that will change the flavor of the beef. Curing. Salt-curing preserves meat through osmosis, the physical reaction in which liquids flow across a membrane, such as the wall of a cell, from a less dense to a more dense solution. The salt or sugar used in curing dissolves in the liquid on the surface of the meat to make a solution that is more dense than the liquid inside the cells of the meat. Water flows out of the meat and out of the cells of any microorganisms living on the meat, killing the microor- ganisms and protecting the meat from bacterial damage. Salt-cured meat is much higher in sodium than fresh meat. Freezing. When you freeze beef, the water inside its cells freezes into sharp ice crystals that can puncture cell membranes. When the beef thaws, moisture (and some of the B vitamins) will leak out through these torn cell walls. The loss of moisture is irreversible, but some of the vitamins can be saved by using the drippings when the meat is cooked. Freezing may also cause freezer burn—dry spots left when moisture evaporates from the surface of the meat. Waxed freezer paper is designed specifically to hold the moisture in meat; plastic wrap and aluminum foil are less effective. NOTE : Commercially prepared beef, which is frozen very quickly at very low temperatures, is less likely to show changes in texture. Irradiation. Irradiation makes meat safer by exposing it to gamma rays, the kind of high- energy ionizing radiation that kills living cells, including bacteria. Irradiation does not change the way meat looks, feels or tastes, or make the food radioactive, but it does alter the structure of some naturally occurring chemicals in beef, breaking molecules apart to form new com- pounds called radiolytic products (R P). About 90 percent of R Ps are also found in nonirradiated foods. The rest, called unique radiolytic products (UR P), are found only in irradiated foods. There is currently no evidence to suggest that UR Ps are harmful; irradiation is an approved technique in more than 37 countries around the world, including the United States. Smoking. Hanging cured or salted meat over an open fire slowly dries the meat, kills micro- organisms on its surface, and gives the meat a rich, “smoky” flavor that varies with the wood used in the fire. Meats smoked over an open fire are exposed to carcinogenic chemicals in the smoke, including a-benzopyrene. Meats treated with “artificial smoke flavoring” are not, since the flavoring is commercially treated to remove tar and a-benzopyrene. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Treating and/or preventing iron deficiency. Without meat in the diet, it is virtually impossible for an adult woman to meet her iron requirement without supplements. One cooked 3.5- ounce hamburger provides about 2.9 mg iron, 16 percent of the R DA for an adult woman of childbearing age. Possible anti-diabetes activity. CLA may also prevent type 2 diabetes, also called adult-onset diabetes, a non-insulin-dependent form of the disease. At Purdue University, rats bred to develop diabetes spontaneously between eight and 10 weeks of age stayed healthy when given CLA supplements. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Increased risk of heart disease. Like other foods from animals, beef contains cholesterol and saturated fats that increase the amount of cholesterol circulating in your blood, raising your risk of heart disease. To reduce the risk of heart disease, the National Cholesterol Education Project recommends following the Step I and Step II diets. The Step I diet provides no more than 30 percent of total daily calories from fat, no more than 10 percent of total daily calories from saturated fat, and no more than 300 mg of cholesterol per day. It is designed for healthy people whose cholesterol is in the range of 200 –239 mg/dL. The Step II diet provides 25– 35 percent of total calories from fat, less than 7 percent of total calories from saturated fat, up to 10 percent of total calories from polyunsaturated fat, up to 20 percent of total calories from monounsaturated fat, and less than 300 mg cho- lesterol per day. This stricter regimen is designed for people who have one or more of the following conditions: •  Existing cardiovascular disease •  High levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs, or “bad” cholesterol) or low levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs, or “good” cholesterol) •  Obesity •  Type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes, or diabetes mellitus) •  Metabolic syndrome, a.k.a. insulin resistance syndrome, a cluster of risk fac- tors that includes type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes) Increased risk of some cancers. According the American Institute for Cancer Research, a diet high in red meat (beef, lamb, pork) increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer by 15 percent for every 1.5 ounces over 18 ounces consumed per week. In 2007, the National Can- cer Institute released data from a survey of 500,000 people, ages 50 to 71, who participated in an eight-year A AR P diet and health study identif ying a higher risk of developing cancer of the esophagus, liver, lung, and pancreas among people eating large amounts of red meats and processed meats. Food-borne illness. Improperly cooked meat contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 has been linked to a number of fatalities in several parts of the United States. In addition, meats con- taminated with other bacteria, viruses, or parasites pose special problems for people with a weakened immune system: the very young, the very old, cancer chemotherapy patients, and people with HIV. Cooking meat to an internal temperature of 140°F should destroy Salmo- nella and Campylobacter jejuni; 165°F, the E. coli organism; and 212°F, Listeria monocytogenes. Antibiotic sensitivity. Cattle in the United States are routinely given antibiotics to protect them from infection. By law, the antibiotic treatment must stop three days to several weeks before the animal is slaughtered. Theoretically, the beef should then be free of antibiotic residues, but some people who are sensitive to penicillin or tetracycline may have an allergic reaction to the meat, although this is rare. Antibiotic-resistant Salmonella and toxoplasmosis. Cattle treated with antibiotics may pro- duce meat contaminated with antibiotic-resistant strains of Salmonella, and all raw beef may harbor ordinary Salmonella as well as T. gondii, the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasmosis is particularly hazardous for pregnant women. It can be passed on to the fetus and may trigger a series of birth defects including blindness and mental retardation. Both Salmonella and the T. gondii can be eliminated by cooking meat thoroughly and washing all utensils, cutting boards, and counters as well as your hands with hot soapy water before touching any other food. Decline in kidney function. Proteins are nitrogen compounds. When metabolized, they yield ammonia, which is excreted through the kidneys. In laborator y animals, a sustained high-protein diet increases the flow of blood through the kidneys, accelerating the natural age-related decline in kidney function. Some experts suggest that this may also occur in human beings. Food/Drug Interactions Tetracycline antibiotics (demeclocycline [Declomycin], doxycycline [ Vibtamycin], methacycline [Rondomycin], minocycline [Minocin], oxytetracycline [Terramycin], tetracycline [Achromycin V, Panmycin, Sumycin]). Because meat contains iron, which binds tetracyclines into com- pounds the body cannot absorb, it is best to avoid meat for two hours before and after taking one of these antibiotics. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Meat “tenderized” with papaya or a papain powder can interact with the class of antidepressant drugs known as monoamine oxidase inhibi- tors. Papain meat tenderizers work by breaking up the long chains of protein molecules. One by-product of this process is tyramine, a substance that constructs blood vessels and raises blood pressure. M AO inhibitors inactivate naturally occurring enzymes in your body that metabolize tyramine. If you eat a food such as papain-tenderized meat, which is high in tyramine, while you are taking a M AO inhibitor, you cannot effectively eliminate the tyramine from your body. The result may be a hypertensive crisis. Theophylline. Charcoal-broiled beef appears to reduce the effectiveness of theophylline because the aromatic chemicals produced by burning fat speed up the metabolism of the- ophylline in the liver.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

(Ale) Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Low Protein: Moderate Fat: None Saturated fat: None Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: High Fiber: None Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: B vitamins Major mineral contribution: Phosphorus About the Nutrients in This Food Beer and ale are fermented beverages created by yeasts that convert the sugars in malted barley and grain to ethyl alcohol (a.k.a. “alcohol,” “drink- ing alcohol”).* The USDA /Health and Human Services Dietary Guidelines for Americans defines one drink as 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.25 ounces of distilled spirits. One 12-ounce glass of beer has 140 calo- ries, 86 of them (61 percent) from alcohol. But the beverage—sometimes nicknamed “liquid bread”—is more than empty calories. Like wine, beer retains small amounts of some nutrients present in the food from which it was made. * Because yeasts cannot digest t he starches in grains, t he grains to be used in mak ing beer and ale are allowed to germinate ( “malt” ). When it is t ime to make t he beer or ale, t he malted grain is soaked in water, forming a mash in which t he starches are split into simple sugars t hat can be digested (fermented) by t he yeasts. If undisturbed, t he fermentat ion will cont inue unt il all t he sugars have been digested, but it can be halted at any t ime simply by raising or lowering t he temperature of t he liquid. Beer sold in bott les or cans is pasteurized to k ill t he yeasts and stop t he fermentat ion. Draft beer is not pasteurized and must be refrigerated unt il tapped so t hat it will not cont inue to ferment in t he container. The longer t he shipping t ime, t he more likely it is t hat draft beer will be exposed to temperature variat ions t hat may affect its qualit y—which is why draft beer almost always tastes best when consumed near t he place where it was brewed. The Nutrients in Beer (12-ounce glass)
  Nutrients   Beer   %R DA
Calcium 17 mg 1.7
Magnesium 28.51 mg 7–9*
Phosphorus 41.1 mg 6
Potassium 85.7 mg (na)
Zinc 0.06 mg 0.5– 0.8*
Thiamin 0.02 mg 1.6 –1.8*
R iboflavin 0.09 mg 7– 8*
Niacin 1.55 mg 10
Vitamin B6 0.17 mg 13
Folate 20.57 mcg 5
  * t he first figure is t he %R DA for a man; t he second, for a woman Source: USDA Nut rient Database: w w w.nal.usda.gov/fnic/cgi-bin /nut _search.pl. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Bland diet Gluten-free diet Low-purine (antigout) diet Buying This Food Look for: A popular brand that sells steadily and will be fresh when you buy it. Avoid: Dusty or warm bottles and cans. Storing This Food Store beer in a cool place. Beer tastes best when consumed within two months of the day it is made. Since you cannot be certain how long it took to ship the beer to the store or how long it has been sitting on the grocery shelves, buy only as much beer as you plan to use within a week or two. Protect bottled beer and open bottles or cans of beer from direct sunlight, which can change sulfur compounds in beer into isopentyl mercaptan, the smelly chemical that gives stale beer its characteristic unpleasant odor. When You Are Ready to Serve This Food Serve beer only in absolutely clean glasses or mugs. Even the slightest bit of grease on the side of the glass will kill the foam immediately. Wash beer glasses with detergent, not soap, and let them drain dry rather than drying them with a towel that might carry grease from your hands to the glass. If you like a long-lasting head on your beer, serve the brew in tall, tapering glasses to let the foam spread out and stabilize. For full flavor, serve beer and ales cool but not ice-cold. Very low temperatures immo- bilize the molecules that give beer and ale their flavor and aroma. What Happens When You Cook This Food When beer is heated (in a stew or as a basting liquid), the alcohol evaporates but the flavor- ing agents remain intact. Alcohol, an acid, reacts with metal ions from an aluminum or iron pot to form dark compounds that discolor the pot or the dish you are cooking in. To prevent this, prepare dishes made with beer in glass or enameled pots. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Reduced risk of heart attack. Data from the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study 1, a 12-year survey of more than 1 million Americans in 25 states, shows that men who take one drink a day have a 21 percent lower risk of heart attack and a 22 percent lower risk of stroke than men who do not drink at all. Women who have up to one drink a day also reduce their risk of heart attack. Numerous later studies have confirmed these findings. Lower risk of stroke. In January 1999, the results of a 677-person study published by researchers at New York Presbyterian Hospital-Columbia University showed that moder- ate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of stroke due to a blood clot in the brain among older people (average age: 70). How the alcohol prevents stroke is still unknown, but it is clear that moderate use of alcohol is a key. Heavy drinkers (those who consume more than seven drinks a day) have a higher risk of stroke. People who once drank heavily, but cut their consumption to moderate levels, can also reduce their risk of stroke. Numerous later studies have confirmed these findings. Lower cholesterol levels. Beverage alcohol decreases the body’s production and storage of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), the protein and fat particles that carr y cholesterol into your arteries. As a result, people who drink moderately tend to have lower cholesterol levels and higher levels of high density lipoproteins (HDLs), the fat and protein particles that carr y cholesterol out of the body. The USDA /Health and Human Services Dietar y Guidelines for Americans defines moderation as two drinks a day for a man, one drink a day for a woman. Stimulating the appetite. Alcoholic beverages stimulate the production of saliva and the gastric acids that cause the stomach contractions we call hunger pangs. Moderate amounts of alcoholic beverages, which may help stimulate appetite, are often prescribed for geriatric patients, convalescents, and people who do not have ulcers or other chronic gastric problems that might be exacerbated by the alcohol. Dilation of blood vessels. Alcohol dilates the capillaries (the tiny blood vessels just under the skin), and moderate amounts of alcoholic beverages produce a pleasant flush that temporar- ily warms the drinker. But drinking is not an effective way to warm up in cold weather since the warm blood that flows up to the capillaries will cool down on the surface of your skin and make you even colder when it circulates back into the center of your body. Then an alco- hol flush will make you perspire, so that you lose more heat. Excessive amounts of beverage alcohol may depress the mechanism that regulates body temperature. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Increased risk of breast cancer. In 2008, scientists at the National Cancer Institute released data from a seven-year survey of more than 100,000 postmenopausal women showing that even moderate drinking (one to two drinks a day) may increase by 32 percent a woman’s risk of developing estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) and progesterone-receptor positive (PR+) breast cancer, tumors whose growth is stimulated by hormones. No such link was found between consuming alcohol and the risk of developing ER-/PR- tumors (not fueled by hor- mones). The finding applies to all types of alcohol: beer, wine, and spirits. Increased risk of oral cancer (cancer of the mouth and throat). Numerous studies confirm the American Cancer Society’s warning that men and women who consume more than two drinks a day are at higher risk of oral cancer than are nondrinkers or people who drink less. Note: The Dietary Guidelines for Americans describes one drink as 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits. Increased risk of cancer of the colon and rectum. In the mid-1990s, studies at the University of Oklahoma suggested that men who drink more than five beers a day are at increased risk of rectal cancer. Later studies suggested that men and women who are heavy beer or spirits drinkers (but not those who are heavy wine drinkers) have a higher risk of colorectal cancers. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. Fetal alcohol syndrome. Fetal alcohol syndrome is a specific pattern of birth defects—low birth weight, heart defects, facial malformations, and mental retardation—first recognized in a study of babies born to alcoholic women who consumed more than six drinks a day while pregnant. Subsequent research has found a consistent pattern of milder defects in babies born to women who consume three to four drinks a day or five drinks on any one occasion while pregnant. To date, there is no evidence of a consistent pattern of birth defects in babies born to women who consume less than one drink a day while pregnant, but two studies at Columbia University have suggested that as few as two drinks a week while preg- nant may raise a woman’s risk of miscarriage. (“One drink” means 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.25 ounces of distilled spirits.) Alcoholism. Alcoholism is an addiction disease, the inability to control one’s alcohol consumption. It is a potentially life-threatening condition, with a higher risk of death by accident, suicide, malnutrition, or acute alcohol poisoning, a toxic reaction that kills by para- lyzing body organs, including the heart. Malnutrition. While moderate alcohol consumption stimulates appetite, alcohol abuse depresses it. In addition, an alcoholic may drink instead of eating. When an alcoholic does eat, excess alcohol in his/her body prevents absorption of nutrients and reduces the ability to synthesize new tissue. Hangover. Alcohol is absorbed from the stomach and small intestine and carried by the bloodstream to the liver, where it is oxidized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the enzyme our bodies use to metabolize the alcohol we produce when we digest carbohydrates. The acetaldehyde is converted to acetyl coenzyme A and either eliminated from the body or used in the synthesis of cholesterol, fatty acids, and body tissues. Although individuals vary widely in their capacity to metabolize alcohol, on average, normal healthy adults can metabolize the alcohol in one quart of beer in approximately five to six hours. If they drink more than that, they will have more alcohol than the body’s natural supply of ADH can handle. The unmetabolized alcohol will pile up in the bloodstream, interfering with the liver’s metabolic functions. Since alcohol decreases the reabsorption of water from the kidneys and may inhibit the secretion of an antidiuretic hormone, they will begin to urinate copiously, losing magnesium, calcium, and zinc but retaining more irritating uric acid. The level of lactic acid in the body will increase, making them feel tired and out of sorts; their acid-base balance will be out of kilter; the blood vessels in their heads will swell and throb; and their stomachs, with linings irritated by the alcohol, will ache. The ultimate result is a “hangover” whose symptoms will disappear only when enough time has passed to allow their bodies to marshal the ADH needed to metabolize the extra alcohol in their blood. Changes in body temperature. Alcohol dilates capillaries, tiny blood vessels just under the skin, producing a “flush” that temporarily warms the drinker. But drinking is not an effective way to stay warm in cold weather. Warm blood flowing up from the body core to the surface capillaries is quickly chilled, making you even colder when it circulates back into your organs. In addition, an alcohol flush triggers perspiration, further cooling your skin. Finally, very large amounts of alcohol may actually depress the mechanism that regulates body temperature. Impotence. Excessive drinking decreases libido (sexual desire) and interferes with the ability to achieve or sustain an erection. Beer belly. Data from a 1995, 12,000 person study at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill show that people who consume at least six beers a week have more rounded abdomens than people who do not drink beer. The question left to be answered is which came first: the tummy or the drinking. Food/Drug Interactions Acetaminophen (Tylenol, etc.). The FDA recommends that people who regularly have three or more drinks a day consult a doctor before using acetaminophen. The alcohol/acetamino- phen combination may cause liver failure. Disulfiram (Antabuse). Taken with alcohol, disulfiram causes flushing, nausea, low blood pressure, faintness, respiratory problems, and confusion. The severity of the reaction gener- ally depends on how much alcohol you drink, how much disulfiram is in your body, and how long ago you took it. Disulfiram is used to help recovering alcoholics avoid alcohol. (If taken with alcohol, metronidazole [Flagyl], procarbazine [Matulane], quinacrine [Atabrine], chlorpropamide (Diabinase), and some species of mushrooms may produce a mild disulfi- ramlike reaction.) Anticoagulants. Alcohol slows the body’s metabolism of anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin), intensif ying the effect of the drugs and increasing the risk of side effects such as spontaneous nosebleeds. Antidepressants. Alcohol may increase the sedative effects of antidepressants. Drinking alcohol while you are taking a monoamine oxidase (M AO) inhibitor is especially hazard- ous. M AO inhibitors inactivate naturally occurring enzymes in your body that metabolize tyramine, a substance found in many fermented or aged foods. Tyramine constricts blood vessels and increases blood pressure. If you eat a food containing tyramine while you are taking an M AO inhibitor, you cannot effectively eliminate the tyramine from your body. The result may be a hypertensive crisis. Ordinarily, fermentation of beer and ale does not produce tyramine, but some patients have reported tyramine reactions after drinking some imported beers. Beer and ale are usually prohibited to those using M AO inhibitors. Aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Like alcohol, these analgesics irritate the lining of the stomach and may cause gastric bleeding. Combining the two intensifies the effect. Insulin and oral hypoglycemics. Alcohol lowers blood sugar and interferes with the metabo- lism of oral antidiabetics; the combination may cause severe hypoglycemia. Sedatives and other central nervous system depressants (tranquilizers, sleeping pills, antidepres- sants, sinus and cold remedies, analgesics, and medication for motion sickness). Alcohol inten- sifies sedation and, depending on the dose, may cause drowsiness, respiratory depression, coma, or death.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Low Protein: Moderate Fat: Low Saturated fat: Low Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: High Fiber: Moderate Sodium: Moderate Major vitamin contribution: Vitamin C Major mineral contribution: Potassium About the Nutrients in This Food Beets are roots, high-carbohydrate foods that provide sugars, starch, and small amounts of dietary fiber, insoluble cellulose in the skin, and soluble pectins in the flesh. Beets are also a good source of the B vitamin folate. One-half cup cooked fresh beets has one gram of dietar y fiber and 68 mcg folate (17 percent of the R DA). The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food Cooked, to dissolve the stiff cell walls and make the nutrients inside available. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Anti-kidney-stone diet Low-sodium diet Buying This Food Look for: Smooth round globes with fresh, crisp green leaves on top. Avoid: Beets with soft spots or blemishes that suggest decay underneath. Storing This Food Protect the nutrients in beets by storing the vegetables in a cool place, such as the vegetable crisper in your refrigerator. When stored, the beet root converts its starch into sugars; the longer it is stored, the sweeter it becomes. Remove the green tops from beets before storing and store the beet greens like other leaf y vegetables, in plastic bags in the refrigerator to keep them from drying out and losing vitamins (also see gr eens). Use both beets and beet greens within a week. Preparing This Food Scrub the globes with a vegetable brush under cold running water. You can cook them whole or slice them. Peel before (or after) cooking. What Happens When You Cook This Food Betacyamin and betaxanthin, the red betalain pigments in beets, are water-soluble. (That’s why borscht is a scarlet soup.) Betacyanins and betaxanthins turn more intensely red when you add acids; think of scarlet sweet-and-sour beets in lemon juice or vinegar with sugar. They turn slightly blue in a basic (alkaline) solution such as baking soda and water. Like carrots, beets have such stiff cell walls that it is hard for the human digestive tract to extract the nutrients inside. Cooking will not soften the cellulose in the beet’s cell walls, but it will dissolve enough hemicellulose so that digestive juices are able to penetrate. Cook- ing also activates flavor molecules in beets, making them taste better. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Canning. Beets lose neither their color nor their texture in canning. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Lower risk of some birth defects. As many as two of every 1,000 babies born in the United States each year may have cleft palate or a neural tube (spinal cord) defect due to their moth- ers’ not having gotten adequate amounts of folate during pregnancy. The R DA for folate is 400 mcg for healthy adult men and women, 600 mcg for pregnant women, and 500 mcg for women who are nursing. Taking folate supplements before becoming pregnant and continu- ing through the first two months of pregnancy reduces the risk of cleft palate; taking folate through the entire pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Possible lower risk of heart attack. In the spring of 1998, an analysis of data from the records of more than 80,000 women enrolled in the long-running Nurses’ Health Study at Harvard School of Public Health/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, demonstrated that a diet providing more than 400 mcg folate and 3 mg vitamin B6 daily, either from food or supple- ments, might reduce a woman’s risk of heart attack by almost 50 percent. Although men were not included in the study, the results were assumed to apply to them as well. However, data from a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December 2006 called this theory into question. Researchers at Tulane Univer- sity examined the results of 12 controlled studies in which 16,958 patients with preexisting cardiovascular diseases were given either folic acid supplements or placebos (“look-alike” pills with no folic acid) for at least six months. The scientists, who found no reduction in the risk of further heart disease or overall death rates among those taking folic acid, concluded that further studies will be required to verif y whether taking folic acid supplements reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Pigmented urine and feces. The ability to metabolize betacyanins and be taxanthins is a genetic trait. People with two recessive genes for this trait cannot break down these red pig- ments, which will be excreted, bright red, in urine. Eating beets can also turn feces red, but it will not cause a false-positive result in a test for occult blood in the stool. Nitrosamine formation. Beets, celery, eggplant, lettuce, radishes, spinach, and collard and turnip greens contain nitrates that convert naturally into nitrites in your stomach—where some of the nitrites combine with amines to form nitrosamines, some of which are known carcinogens. This natural chemical reaction presents no known problems for a healthy adult. However, when these vegetables are cooked and left standing for a while at room tempera- ture, microorganisms that convert nitrates to nitrites begin to multiply, and the amount of nitrites in the food rises. The resulting higher-nitrite foods may be dangerous for infants (see spinach).... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Beneficial Teas

Lapsang Souchong tea is a type of black tea originating from China. Out of all the types of black tea, this one is special thanks to its history, rich taste and health benefits. Find out more about the Lapsang Souchong tea in this article. About the Lapsang Souchong tea Lapsang Souchong tea is a type of black tea originating from China, from the Wuyi region of the Fujian province. It is the first type of black tea in history, having been discovered around the beginning of the 19th century. Later, people started to move the tea bushes even outside of China, for example to India or Sri Lanka. The flavor of this tea is smoky, rich and fruity. It goes well with salty and spicy dishes, as well as with cheese. Lapsang Souchong tea - a smoked tea It is said that the lapsang souchong tea was discovered by accident. During the Dao Guang era of the Qing Dynasty, an army unit passed through Xingcu village and decided to set camp at a tea factory filled with unprocessed tea leaves. The workers could only return at the company after the soldiers left. Discovering that they didn’t have enough time to let the leaves dry, the workers decided to speed up the process. What they did was to place the tea leaves into bamboo baskets and dry them over fires made from local pines. This is how the lapsang souchong tea was discovered. Because of this, it is also called “smoked tea”. Seeing as they are smoke-dried over fires made from pine wood, the lapsang souchong tea has a strong, smoky flavor. How to make lapsang souchong tea To make lapsang souchong tea, you need one teaspoon of leaves for a 6 ounce cup. Leave it to steep for 3-4 minutes before you remove the leaves. You can later use the leaves to resteep, but the flavor might differ after each steeping. The lapsang souchong tea is usually drunk without milk or sugar. People either love its taste, or completely hate it, so there’s no need to change it. Benefits of lapsang souchong tea The lapsang souchong tea, just like all other types of black teas, has many health benefits that should encourage you to drink more of it. First of all, drinking lapsang souchong tea can reduce your chances of getting cancer. It also helps reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, as it lowers the cholesterol in your blood and helps the blood flow better in your veins. The lapsang souchong tea helps strengthen your immunity, protecting you from viruses that lead to colds, the flu or other diseases. It also helps you fight against various types of inflammations. During diets, it is recommended to drink black tea; this includes the lapsang souchong tea, as well. It helps burn fats faster and, therefore, helps you lose weight. Side effects of lapsang souchong tea The side effects of the lapsang souchong tea are those found at other types of black tea, as well. They are related to the caffeine found in the tea’s composition, and drinking too much tea. If you know caffeine isn’t good for you, be careful when drinking lapsang souchong tea. It may cause you to experience the following symptoms: insomnia, anxiety, headache, dizziness, irritability, blurred vision and skin rashes. You also have to be careful if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. In the case of pregnancy, the caffeine in the lapsang souchong tea (and caffeine in general) can cause miscarriages and birth defects. If you’re breastfeeding, lapsang souchong tea can affect the baby, who might get insomnia, heart palpitations and tremors. Also, if you’re suffering from ulcer, don’t drink too much lapsang souchong tea. The caffeine in its composition may increase the production of stomach acid and, therefore, aggravate the ulcer symptoms. It is recommended that you not drink more than six cups of tea per day. Otherwise, it might end up becoming harmful rather than helpful. The side effects that you might get are headaches, dizziness, insomnia, irregular heartbeats, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. If you encounter any of these symptoms, reduce the amount of tea you drink. This applies to all types of tea, including the lapsang souchong tea. If you want a special kind of black tea, try the lapsang souchong tea. The smoky, fruity flavor will definitely charm you. And don’t forget, it’s also good for your health!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Meadowsweet tea is one of the many herbal teas with plenty of health benefits. It is made from the meadowsweet herb, which can be found in Europe and Western Asia. The plant, as well as the tea, helps you stay healthy. Find out more information about meadowsweet tea! About Meadowsweet Tea Meadowsweet tea’s main ingredient is meadowsweet, a perennial herb that grows in moist meadows. It is found in Europe and Western Asia; it has also been introduced and naturalized in North America. The stems are 1-2m tall, with dark-green leaves and delicate, white flowers called cymes, which grow in clusters. The flowers bloom from June to early September, and have a strong, sweet smell. The plant has a rich history. The flowers of the plant were found in a Bronze Age cairn in Carmarthenshire, along with the cremated remains of three people. They were also found inside a Beaker from Ashgrove, Fife, and a vessel from North Mains, Strathallan. In Chaucer’s “The Knight’s tale”, it is called Meadwort, representing one of the ingredients for a drink called “save”. Also, during the 16th century, it was Queen Elizabeth I’s favorite herb for strewing the floors in her chambers. The plant can be used as a strewing herb, thanks to its strong, pleasant aroma, as well as to flavor wine, beer, and other vinegars. The flowers are used with jams, to give them a subtle almond flavor. How to prepare Meadowsweet Tea It isn’t difficult to make a cup of meadowsweet tea. Just add one teaspoon of dried meadowsweet herbs (usually the leaves of the plant) to a cup of boiling water and let it steep for about 10 minutes. Once the steeping time is done, strain to remove the herbs. You can add lemon and/or honey, based on your taste. Health Benefits of Meadowsweet Tea The meadowsweet tea comes with many health benefits, thanks to its main ingredient, the meadowsweet herb. The herb is known to include, among other substances, salicylic acid, essential oils, and tannins. The plant also contains the chemicals necessary to make aspirin, and from its roots you can obtain a natural black dye. The health benefits of the meadowsweet tea are just as important. First of all, it helps you with digestion. It protects the mucous membranes of the digestive tract by reducing excess acidity and easing nausea. It also helps with diarrhea. Meadowsweet teais often recommended when dealing with colds and the flu. It helps reduce the fever, as well as with headaches; it also treats coughs. Meadowsweet tea is used to treat heartburn, gastritis, peptic ulceration, and hyperacidity. It also helps relieve rheumatism-induced pain in muscles and joints. Side-effects of Meadowsweet Tea If you know that aspirin is not good for your health, be careful when drinking meadowsweet tea. As meadowsweet is one of the ingredients of aspirin, it might affect you to some extent. For example, in the case of about one out of five persons suffering from asthma, aspirin induced asthma symptoms. Those suffering from asthma need to keep in mind the fact that meadowsweet teamay induce asthma symptoms, as well. Meadowsweet tea might not be good for you if you’ve got internal bleeding problems. The herb might cancel the effects of prescribed blood thinners, therefore causing more harm than helping you. Also, don’t drink meadowsweet tea if you’re pregnant, as it might cause miscarriages. If you drink too much meadowsweet tea, you might get the following symptoms: blood in the stool, vomiting, or ringing in the ears; it might even lead to kidney problems. Plus, it is not recommended to drink more than six cups of tea a day, no matter the tea. If you drink too much, you’ll get headaches, dizziness, insomnia, irregular heartbeats, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. Meadowsweet tea is definitely good for your body! Having all these health benefits, you won’t regret including it in your daily diet. If you’re sure you won’t get any side effects, then you’re free to enjoy a cup of aromatic tea!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

For a healthy beverage, try the mistletoe tea! You should already know the plant thanks to its association with the Christmas traditions. However, there’s more to mistletoe than just being a decorative plant. Find out about the health benefits ofmistletoe tea! About the Mistletoe Tea The main ingredient of the mistletoe tea is the hemi-parasitic plant, the mistletoe. It is an evergreen plant that usually grows on the branches of various trees, such as elms, pines or oak. The mistletoe can be found in Europe, Australia, North America, and some parts of North Asia. The woody stem has oval, evergreen leaves, and waxy, white berries. The berries are poisonous; the leaves are the ones used to produce themistletoe tea. Mistletoe is often used as a Christmas decoration. It is hung somewhere in the house, and remains so during next Christmas, when it gets replaced. It is said that it protects the house from lightning or fire. Also, legends say that a man and a woman who meet under a hanging of mistletoe are obliged to kiss. The origin of this custom may be Scandinavian, and the first documented case of a couple kissing under the mistletoe dates from 16th century England. There are two types of mistletoe that matter: the European mistletoe and the American mistletoe. Regarding their appearance, they look pretty similar. The difference is that the American mistletoe has shorter leaves, and longer clusters of 10 or more berries. Other differences between the two are related to health benefits. How to prepare Mistletoe Tea Properly preparing a cup of mistletoe tea takes some time. First, you add a teaspoon of the dried mistletoe herb to a cup of cold water. Let the cup stay overnight at room temperature. On the next day, heat the mix before drinking. To enjoy its rich flavor, don’t skip any of these steps! Benefits of Mistletoe Tea The mistletoe tea has many health benefits thanks to its main ingredient, the mistletoe. The herb includes various active constituents, such as amines, caffeic and myristic acids, mucilage, terpenoids, and tannins. Mistletoe is also an essential ingredient of the European anti-cancer extract called Iscador, which helps stimulate the immune system and kill cancer cells. Therefore, it’s said that mistletoe teahelps you fight against cancer. Another health benefit of the mistletoe tea is that it reduces symptoms associated with high blood pressure, such as irritability, dizziness, headaches, and loss of energy. This, however, applies to the mistletoe tea made leaves of European mistletoe. The leaves of the American mistletoe is said to raise blood pressure. Another health-related difference between the European and the American mistletoe is related to uterine and intestinal contractions. The European mistletoe acts as an antispasmodic and calming agent, while the American mistletoe increases uterine and intestinal contractions. Be careful with the type of mistletoe tealeavesyou use. Mistletoe tea can also help with relieving panic attacks, nervousness, and headaches. It is a useful treatment against hysteria, epilepsy, and tinnitus. It is also recommended in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes, breast cancer, and to support HIV patients. Drinking mistletoe teahelps with diarrhea, as well. It is useful when it comes to menopause and pre-menstrual syndrome. It is also useful when dealing with respiratory ailments such as coughs and asthma. Side effects of Mistletoe Tea First of it, it is recommended not to have children drink mistletoe tea. Also, if you are pregnant or breast feeding, it is best that you stop drinking mistletoe tea. If you have hepatitis, you need to stay away from mistletoe tea. Consumption of mistletoe tea will only cause more damage to the liver. Also, despite being useful when treating diabetes, mistletoe tea mayinterfere with the action of anti-diabetic medications. It is best that you check with your doctor, to make sure it doesn’t cancel the effects of the medication. Cancer patients should also consult with their doctors first, before adding mistletoe tea to their daily diet. Other side effects that you might experience because of mistletoe tea are flu-like symptoms, including fever, nausea, abdominal pain, and various allergy-type symptoms. Lastly, don’t drink more than 6 cups of mistletoe tea a day. If you do, it might cause you more harm than good. You might get some of the following symptoms: headaches, dizziness, insomnia, irregular heartbeats, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. If you get any of these symptoms, reduce the amount of mistletoe tea you drink. Also, this can apply to all types of tea, not only mistletoe tea.   Don’t just think of Christmas when you hear someone talking about mistletoe. Remember the many health benefits of mistletoe tea. Check for side effects and if it’s all safe, feel free to include mistletoe teain your daily diet. It will definitely help you stay healthy!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Privet tea has been known for its health benefits, especially related to liver and kidney problems. As an herbal tea, it is a good everyday drink which also helps you stay healthy. Find out more about it in this article! About Privet Tea Privet tea is made from privet, an herbal plant which grows all around the world. The privet is a semi-evergreen shrub which includes species of plants used as hedges in gardens. Some species can grow up to 20 meters tall. The plant has glossy, oppositely-arranged, dark green leaves; they can grow as long as 10-12cm. The flowers are small, white, fragrant and blooming in pinnacles. The fruits are purple-black drupes born in clusters; the fruits of some species can be poisonous to humans. How to prepare Privet Tea The fruit of the plant is used to make privet tea. To enjoy this tea, you need to add some dried privet fruit to a cup of freshly-boiled water. Let it steep for 5-7 minutes before you remove the dried fruit. Sweeten it with honey, if you want to. If not, your tea’s ready! You can also use granulated or powdered forms of the fruit in order to make privet tea. Privet Tea Benefits Privet tea has plenty of health benefits thanks to the active constituents which are transferred from the fruit of the herbal plant. Some of them include ligustrum, oleanolic acid, betulinic acid, ursolic acid, saponins and tannins. Drinking privet tea will help strengthen your immune system. Thanks to this, it is often recommended in the treatment for HIV, AIDS, and cancer. It is also often used in treating liver and kidney problems, as well as hepatitis, hypertension, Parkinson’s disease, and respiratory tract infections. Privet tea is also helpful when it comes to treating backaches, insomnia, palpitations, rheumatic pains, and tinnitus. You can use it if you’re feeling dizzy, tired or you’ve got blurred vision caused by stress. It also reduces the chances of getting grey hair, and helps you deal with premature menopause or general menopausal problems. Privet Tea Side Effects If you’re pregnant or breast feeding, you should stop drinking privet tea. Also, children with ages under 12 shouldn’t drink it either. Privet tea can worsen asthma symptoms to those already suffering from this disease. You should also avoid drinking it if you’ve got diarrhea. You should be careful with the amount of privet tea you drink: don’t drink more than 5-6 cups of tea a day. This counts for other types of tea, as well. If you drink too much, you might get some of these symptoms: headaches, dizziness, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, and loss of appetite. Privet tea has very few side effects, while it has plenty of important health benefits. It can be consumed every day with no worries.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Try an herbal tea from Africa - pygeum bark tea. Despite its bitter, slightly unpleasant taste, this tea is becoming quite popular. It has plenty of health benefits which will surely help you stay healthy. Find out more about pygeum bark tea and give it a try! About Pygeum Bark Tea Pygeum bark tea is made from the bark of the pygeum tree, an evergreen tree which belongs to the rose family. It grows in central and southern Africa, although it has become endangered due to the large demands for the tree’s bark. A mature tree can be as tall as 25m. The bark is black-brown and scaly, with alternate, simple and long dark green leaves. The flowers bloom from October to May; they are androgynous and greenish-white. The fruit is red-brown, rather wide but not big (about 1cm) and has two lobs, with a seed in each one. The fruit can be used as food both for humans and animals. The wood can be used to make tools, or build homes. How to prepare Pygeum Bark Tea There are two ways in which you can make pygeum bark tea. One involves chopped bark; add it to a cup of freshly-boiled water and let it steep for 10-15 minutes. For the other, you can use the powdered form of the pygeum; you add it to a cup of boiled water, letting it steep for 3-5 minutes. Pygeum bark tea is known to be pretty bitter. If the taste is too much for you, sweeten it with milk, honey or fruit juice. Pygeum Bark Tea Benefits A few important active constituents that are transferred from the pygeum bark to the tea are: beta-sitosterol, ursolic acid, oleanic acid and ferulic acid. Pygeum bark tea can be drunk by men, as it has important health benefits for them. It is often added in the treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia. It is also recommended in the case of male infertility, as it increases the quantity and quality of the sperm. It can even be used as an aphrodisiac, as it enhances the sexual performance. Pygeum bark tea is used to treat urinary tract infections (cystitis, prostatitis); it also increases the urinary function. You can drink pygeum bark tea if you’ve got symptoms of bronchitis, influenza, or various other respiratory infections. This tea will also help you if you’ve got a fever. An interesting benefit is related to hair: drinking pygeum bark tea is quite useful in the treatment for hair loss. The infusion can be applied on wet hair, after it’s been washed with shampoo. Try it if you’ve got these problems. Pygeum Bark Tea Side Effects If you’re pregnant or breast feeding, it is best not to drink pygeum bark tea; it can affect the baby in both cases. Also, it’s safer not to give it to children, either. It might neutralize the effects of various types of medication. Make sure you talk to your doctor first if you’re taking any kind of medication; he will tell you if it’s safe or not to drink pygeum bark tea. Also, drinking too much pygeum bark tea might not be good for you. It might lead to stomach discomfort, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, dizziness, headaches, or visual disturbances. Don’t let its bitter taste scare you - pygeum bark tea is good for your health. It is especially recommended for men, but it can be useful for women, as well.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Red Tea has gained popularity around the world due to its anti-viral, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. Often made under the name of „red tea” are Rooibos tea and Honeybush tea, because of their fiery shades similar to the color red. The constituents of Red Tea are basically antioxidants such as aspalathin and nothofagin. But red tea is also rich in vitamins and minerals: calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, vitamin C and zinc. It does not contain caffeine and it can be safely taken by people with kidney problems. How To Make Red Tea Brewing Rooibos Tea To brew Rooibos Tea, you will have to heat the water until it just begins to boil. Take it off the heat and pour it over a teaspoon of rooibos leaves or tea bag. Cover it and let the tea steep for about 4-6 minutes. You can either enoy rooibos tea as it is, or you can add honey, sugar or milk. Brewing Honeybush Tea To make Honeybush Tea, start by infusing 2 tablespoons of dried honeybush herbs in a liter of boiled water for about 20 minutes. After that, strain the Honeybush Tea and enjoy! To really maximize its health benefits, try not to add any sweetener or milk. Red Tea Benefits
  • Due to its antioxidant content, Red Tea may lower the risk of developing tumors and cancer.
  • Helps treat allergies like eczema, fever or asthma.
  • Keeps your skin healthy.
  • Strengthens your immune system.
  • Provides relaxation, calming the nervous system.
  • Helps control blood pressure.
Red Tea Side Effects
  • Red tea is not recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women. The herb can harm both infant or fetus.
  • Young children should not drink red tea since the herb may have adverse reactions for young patients.
  • People who suffer from diabetes should not consume red tea. The herb can drastically lower blood sugar levels.
 Red Tea is an amazing tea with a lot of health benefits. Make sure you read the side effects listed above and experience only its benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Biota tea is a Chinese beverage, used nowadays to heal hemorrhages and other types of ailments, such as headaches, but not only. Biota tea description Biota is a slow-growing shrub or tree from the cypress family, originating from China. It is considered as one of the 50 fundamental herbs in the annals of Chinese herbalism. Biota has a central stem, scale-like leaves and little inconspicuous flowers. The biota leaves are small, and triangular-shaped, with a grayish-green color and a fragrant odor. The seeds are the eatable parts of this plant. Both the leaves and the seeds are used for medicinal purposes. Biota trees and shrubs have ornamental uses as they make beautiful natural fences and hedges. Also, they are good as wind breakers and as a good ground cover for a variety of wildlife. Parts from these plants make useful additions as culinary ingredients and medicinal herbs. These vegetative substances became part of the cosmetic industry, being added to lotions, shampoos and conditioners. Biota tea is the beverage resulting from brewing the abovementioned plant. Biota tea brewing To prepare Biota tea, add the dried leaves in the boiling water and stir the mixture. Strain it and drink it slowly. Biota tea benefits Biota tea has been successfully used to:
  • fight headaches
  • fight asthma, cough and bronchitis
  • fight fever
  • fight bacteria and viruses
  • heal wounds, treat burns, as well as improve the growth of hair, when applied topically
  • help in the treatment of excessive menstruation
  • fight hemorrhages
  • ease arthritic pain
  • help in the treatment of premature baldness
  • soothe and calm the nerves
  • fight constipation among the elderly
Biota tea side effects Pregnant or nursing women should not intake Biota tea. Biota tea is a healthy beverage able to fight against bacteria, viruses or even prevent baldness, if applied topically. It also proved its efficiency in dealing with arthritic pains.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Birch tea is a medicinal beverage made from the leaves or the bark of the plant. It is enjoyed worldwide for its health benefits and also for its tasty flavor. Birch tea description Birch is a soft-wood tree, found in the woodlands of cold climate countries, especially in North America and Europe. It is a fast-growing tree that can reach 65 feet in height. The birch tree is known for its silvery-white bark that tends to peel off in layers. The ‘oil of birch’ has potent properties in the anti-cancer treatment. Birch is a natural pain reliever with salicylate, the compound found in aspirin. Birch leaf is a medicinal remedy for various forms of upset stomach. Birch tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Birch tea brewing To make Birch tea from the leaves:
  • Place 2 to 3 teaspoonfuls in a cup and pour on boiling water.
  • Cover the mix and allow it to steep for 10 minutes.
  • Drink the tea about three times a day.
Birch tea can also be made using the bark of the tree:
  • Place a teaspoon of dried birch bark in a cup of boiling water.
  • Allow it to steep for 15 minutes.
  • Drink the tea twice or thrice a day.
Birch tea can be sweetened with honey. The resulting beverage has a very aromatic flavor. The parts used for tea are the leaves, twigs, and the bark. Birch tea benefits Birch tea has been successfully used to:
  • alleviate joint pain related to rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis
  • combat gout
  • fight urinary disorders
  • increase urination
  • treat melanoma
  • help fighting skin breakouts and other dermatological problems (applied topically as a wash or added to bath water)
  • soothe sore muscles
Also, Birch tea may help remove excess fluids from the body. Birch tea side effects Birch tea is not recommended to pregnant and nursing women. Also, it not advised to people allergic to aspirin. Birch tea is best known for itsanti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties. It is also largely used to remove excess fluids from the body.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Bistort tea is widely known as an adjuvant in the areas of treating stomach, respiratory and bleeding problems. It can be intaken two or three times a day to fully enjoy its healthy benefits. Bistort Tea description Bistort is a perennially-growing plant from the Northern Hemisphere. It is normally grown as an ornamental plant because of its small white and pink blooms. It contains vitamins A and C, mucilage and antioxidants, acknowledged for their anti-cancer action. However, Bistort is also cultivated for medicinal purposes, being well-known as one of the most astringent herb. Bistort tea is the beverage resulting from brewing the abovementioned plant. Bistort Tea brewing Bistort tea can be made as a decoction:
  • Place one teaspoonful of the dried bistort rhizome in a 250 ml cup of water and boil the mix.
  • Let it steep for about 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Strain the liquid.
Bistort tea can be consumed twice or thrice a day. It can also be used as a gargle or mouthwash to treat infections inside the mouth. Bistort Tea benefits Bistort tea has been successfully used to:
  • treat diarrhea, dysentery and irritable bowel syndrome
  • aid in the treatment of diverticulitis
  • help treating oral and tongue inflammations
  • help fighting pharyngitis and sore throat
  • help in the treatment of jaundice
  • aid fighting measles and smallpox
  • fight hemorrhoids
  • ease menstrual bleeding
  • help in the healing of wounds, skin ruptures and burstings (when applied topically)
Bistort tea may also help expel worms. Bistort Tea side effects A long-term administration of Bistort tea is not recommended. Pregnant and nursing women are advised not to intake this tea. Bistort tea is a medicinal remedy against several digestive problems and, it also proved to be effective in treating menstrual bleeding, but not only.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Bitter Melon tea is a bitter beverage, very useful in treating a large array of diseases such as diabetes, but not only. Bitter Melon Tea description Bitter Melon is an herbaceous tendril-bearing vine that grows in parts of East Africa, Asia, the Caribbean islands, and parts of South America. It has dainty yellow flowers, bearing an oblong-shaped fruit that has a pockmarked and warty exterior which turns yellow when ripe. Its flesh is crunchy and watery in texture whereas its skin is tender and edible. The taste of the fruit is very bitter. Bitter Melon tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant, best known for its efficiency against diabetes. The plant is also added to several types of food, as a culinary ingredient. Bitter Melon Tea brewing To prepare Bitter Melon tea:
  • Place a handful of leaves in a pot of boiling water
  • Boil the mix until the water turns green
  • Let the mix steep for about 5 minutes
The taste is quite bitter. Also, the Bitter Melon fruit can also be made into a tea. The majority of cultures prefer to use the leaves for making tea while the fruit is consumed as an addition to dishes. Bitter Melon Tea benefits Bitter Melon tea has proved its efficiency in treating:
  • abdominal gas and colic
  • liver problems
  • ulcers in different parts of the body
  • digestion (It may also help ease symptoms of dyspepsia and constipation)
Bitter Melon tea is said to help in regulating blood sugar levels, being widely used as a herbal remedy by diabetes patients. Bitter Melon tea can be used in the treatment of HIV. Bitter Melon Tea side effects Bitter Melon tea should never be taken in conjuncture with any form of diabetes medication. Pregnant and nursing women should also avoid this tea. Bitter Melon Tea is a natural remedy against type 1 and type 2 of diabetes. It is also consumed for its healing properties when dealing with abdominal gas and colic.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Black haw tea is made by brewing the bark of the plant. It is largely used for its healing properties in medical issues like menstrual cramps. Black Haw Tea description Black haw is a small deciduous shrub, originating from North America. It grows in moist woods, thickets, and along stream banks. It has red brown bark, flat-topped white flowers, and grooved branches. Black haw possesses edible red berries typically ripen in August. Its berries can be eaten or made into jams or preserves. During the pre-Civil War days in America, the black haw was believed to boost fertility. It is also said that Black haw tea has been drunk by slave women (at the behest of slave owners) to increase their ability to bear more children. Most of the health properties of this plant are derived from its bark. Black haw tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Black Haw Tea brewing To make Black haw tea:
  • Boil two teaspoonfuls of dried Black haw bark in a cup of water (Bring water to a gentle boil).
  • Allowed it to simmer for ten minutes and then cool it and strain it.
The Black haw tea can be taken twice a day during the treatment period. Black Haw Tea benefits Black haw tea has been successfully used to:
  • help in alleviating symptoms of menopause and menstrual cramps in women
  • help prevent a miscarriage in women
  • alleviate labor pains
  • help in easing uterine disorders in women
  • help in the treatment of migraine headaches
  • help lower blood pressure
Black Haw Tea side effects Black haw tea is not recommended to pregnant and nursing women until further studies are conducted. Black haw tea is a medicinal beverage used for years to induce fertility and to alleviate labor pains, but not only.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

People are divided into four main groups in respect of a certain reaction of the blood. This depends upon the capacity of the serum of one person’s blood to cause the red cells of another’s to stick together (agglutinate). The reaction depends on antigens (see ANTIGEN), known as agglutinogens, in the erythrocytes and on ANTIBODIES, known as agglutinins, in the serum. There are two of each, the agglutinogens being known as A and B. A person’s erythrocytes may have (1) no agglutinogens, (2) agglutinogen A, (3) agglutinogen B, (4) agglutinogens A and B: these are the four groups. Since the identi?cation of the ABO and Rhesus factors (see below), around 400 other antigens have been discovered, but they cause few problems over transfusions.

In blood transfusion, the person giving and the person receiving the blood must belong to the same blood group, or a dangerous reaction will take place from the agglutination that occurs when blood of a di?erent group is present. One exception is that group O Rhesus-negative blood can be used in an emergency for anybody.

Rhesus factor In addition to the A and B agglutinogens (or antigens), there is another one known as the Rhesus (or Rh) factor – so named because there is a similar antigen in the red blood corpuscles of the Rhesus monkey. About 84 per cent of the population have this Rh factor in their blood and are therefore known as ‘Rh-positive’. The remaining 16 per cent who do not possess the factor are known as ‘Rh-negative’.

The practical importance of the Rh factor is that, unlike the A and B agglutinogens, there are no naturally occurring Rh antibodies. However, such antibodies may develop in a Rh-negative person if the Rh antigen is introduced into his or her circulation. This can occur (a) if a Rh-negative person is given a transfusion of Rh-positive blood, and (b) if a Rh-negative mother married to a Rh-positive husband becomes pregnant and the fetus is Rh-positive. If the latter happens, the mother develops Rh antibodies which can pass into the fetal circulation, where they react with the baby’s Rh antigen and cause HAEMOLYTIC DISEASE of the fetus and newborn. This means that, untreated, the child may be stillborn or become jaundiced shortly after birth.

As about one in six expectant mothers is Rh-negative, a blood-group examination is now considered an essential part of the antenatal examination of a pregnant woman. All such Rh-negative expectant mothers are now given a ‘Rhesus card’ showing that they belong to the rhesus-negative blood group. This card should always be carried with them. Rh-positive blood should never be transfused to a Rh-negative girl or woman.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Blue Flag tea has a long history in treating liver ailments: Native American tribes used to consume it for its hepatic properties. Blue Flag Tea description Blue flag is a perennial herb also known as the liver lily and the fleur-de-lis, native to North America. It has smooth spear-shaped leaves topped with a light bluish-purple flower. Blue flag plants grow in bunches and bloom during late June and early July. Blue Flag tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Blue Flag Tea brewing To prepare Blue Flag tea, place 1 teaspoon of the dried roots in a cup of boiling water. Let it steep for 10 minutes. The tea can be consumed three times a day. Blue Flag Tea benefits Blue Flag has been successfully used to:
  • stimulate the liver and thus, it is helpful in the treatment of jaundice and hepatitis
  • fight impurities of the blood
  • fight against skin problems like acne and psoriasis
  • detoxify the body by increasing the production of bile, as well as frequency of urination
  • help treat indigestion
  • treat rheumatism
  • help in weight loss
Blue Flag tea can be an effective laxative, diuretic and as an emetic. It is also effective in reducing inflammation of the skin, decreasing the symptoms of skin infections. It is also good in treating burns, bruises and wounds. Blue Flag Tea side effects Until further studies are conducted, pregnant and nursing women should avoid intaking this type of tea. Blue Flag tea has proven its efficiency in dealing with severe liver-related diseases. Also, applied topically, it can treat skin problems, but not only.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Boldo tea has a long medicinal history, according to recent archeological discoveries. It is a healthy choice for the liver, urinary tract and infections. Boldo Tea description Boldo is a tree found in the central region of Chile and near the Mediterranean. It is an evergreen shrub whose leaves are colored brown when dried and whose fruits are small green spheres. Apparently, boldo use dates back at least 10,000 years. Nowadays, people use this plant to aid digestion, cleanse the liver and increase bile production for gallbladder’s health. Boldo tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Boldo Tea brewing To prepare Boldo tea:
  • Pour boiling water over 1 teaspoon of dried boldo leaves.
  • Let the mix infuse for about 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Drink it slowly.
Boldo tea can be drunk three times a day for short periods of time. Boldo Tea benefits Studies have shown that Boldo tea is efficient in:
  • treating urinary tract and bladder infections
  • helping in liver cleansing
  • helping alleviate heartburn
  • relieving discomfort in the gallbladder
  • helping treat mild stomach cramps
  • treating worm infections
  • helping in the treatment of cystitis
  • treating gonorrhea
Boldo Tea side effects Patients with severe liver or kidney disease or obstruction of the bile ducts are advised to avoid the use of Boldo tea. Pregnant and nursing women should not consume Boldo tea. Boldo tea is a medicinal beverage which proved its efficiency in dealing with liver cleansing and urinary tract infections. It is recommended to patients suffering from stomach cramps, but not only.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Boneset tea has the reputation of a very effective “cure-all”. It is highly recommended to people looking to enhance their immunity in a natural way. Boneset Tea description Boneset is a daisy, commonly found in the eastern part of North America, on roadsides and in wet ground. It has a long, hairy stem with white flower toppings. The flowers normally bloom during July to September. The plant gained its name from its traditional use of treating dengue or breakbone fever, a viral infection causing muscle pain so intense that patients feel their bones are on the verge of breaking. The plant has therapeutic properties which can be intaken through teas, tinctures and capsules. Boneset tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Boneset Tea brewing To make Boneset tea:
  • place two to three teaspoons of dried boneset herbs (leaves, flowers or the stem) into a cup of boiling water
  • allow the mixture to steep for about 10 to 15 minutes
Boneset Tea has a very bitter taste. Honey or lemon can be added to the tea. Boneset Tea benefits Boneset tea has been successfully used to:
  • treat colds, coughs and ailments in the upper respiratory tract
  • help in the treatment of influenza, malaria and fever
  • help relieve migraine headache
  • relieve pain from arthritis and rheumatism
  • help in the treatment of jaundice
  • fight intestinal worms
Boneset Tea side effects Boneset tea is not recommended for long-term use because high doses of this plant may cause damage to the liver or to the kidney. It is recommended not to be taken for a longer period than two weeks. Overdose may be deadly. Pregnant women and children under 6 years should not consume Boneset tea. Boneset tea is a medicinal remedy that can treat ailments of the upper respiratory tract, influenza, migraines but not only.  ... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Brahmi Tea isbest known in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for its role against motor and nerve disorders. It possesses a pungent and bitter flavor, being a tonic, a mild sedative and a diuretic. Brahmi Tea description Brahmi is a perennial creeping herb, commonly found in India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, China, Vietnam and in the southern parts of the United States. It grows on wetlands and muddy shores. Brahmi is medicinally and culinary used. It is known as “food for the brain”, brahmi being used since the 6th century in Ayurvedic medicine as a cognitive enhancer. In India, the herb is still used by students and schoolchildren to help their brain functions. Brahmi tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Brahmi Tea brewing Brahmi tea can be made by immersing ½ teaspoon of dried brahmi herbs into one cup of boiling water. Let it soak and steep it for about 5 minutes. Drink it slowly. Brahmi Tea benefits Brahmi tea has proven its efficiency in:
  • improving the memory and enhancing mental functions, agility and alertness (It is helpful in retention of new information)
  • calming the mind and promoting relaxation
  • improving motor learning ability
  • promoting greater concentration and focus
  • treating asthma
  • treating epilepsy
  • treating indigestion
Brahmi Tea side effects High doses of Brahmi tea may causeheadaches, nausea, dizziness and extreme drowsiness. Pregnant and nursing women should not intake this beverage. Brahmi tea is a medicinal beverage successfully used to enhance the memory processes and to promote relaxation. It is also efficient in dealing with indigestion, but not only.... Beneficial Teas

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Low Protein: High Fat: Low Saturated fat: Low Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: Moderate Fiber: Very high Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: Vitamin A, folate, vitamin C Major mineral contribution: Calcium About the Nutrients in This Food Broccoli is very high-fiber food, an excellent source of vitamin A, the B vitamin folate, and vitamin C. It also has some vitamin E and vitamin K, the blood-clotting vitamin manufactured primarily by bacteria living in our intestinal tract. One cooked, fresh broccoli spear has five grams of dietary fiber, 2,500 IU vitamin A (108 percent of the R DA for a woman, 85 percent of the R DA for a man), 90 mcg folate (23 percent of the R DA), and 130 mg vitamin C (178 percent of the R DA for a woman, 149 percent of the R DA for a man). The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food Raw. Studies at the USDA Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, show that raw broccoli has up to 40 percent more vitamin C than broccoli that has been cooked or frozen. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Antiflatulence diet Low-fiber diet Buying This Food Look for: Broccoli with tightly closed buds. The stalk, leaves, and florets should be fresh, firm, and brightly colored. Broccoli is usually green; some varieties are tinged with purple. Avoid: Broccoli with woody stalk or florets that are open or turning yellow. When the green chlorophyll pigments fade enough to let the yellow carotenoids underneath show through, the buds are about to bloom and the broccoli is past its prime. Storing This Food Pack broccoli in a plastic bag and store it in the refrigerator or in the vegetable crisper to protect its vitamin C. At 32°F, fresh broccoli can hold onto its vitamin C for as long as two weeks. Keep broccoli out of the light; like heat, light destroys vitamin C. Preparing This Food First, rinse the broccoli under cool running water to wash off any dirt and debris clinging to the florets. Then put the broccoli, florets down, into a pan of salt water (1 tsp. salt to 1 qt. water) and soak for 15 to 30 minutes to drive out insects hiding in the florets. Then cut off the leaves and trim away woody section of stalks. For fast cooking, divide the broccoli up into small florets and cut the stalk into thin slices. What Happens When You Cook This Food The broccoli stem contains a lot of cellulose and will stay firm for a long time even through the most vigorous cooking, but the cell walls of the florets are not so strongly fortified and will soften, eventually turning to mush if you cook the broccoli long enough. Like other cruciferous vegetables, broccoli contains mustard oils (isothiocyanates), natural chemicals that break down into a variety of smelly sulfur compounds (including hydrogen sulfide and ammonia) when the broccoli is heated. The reaction is more intense in aluminum pots. The longer you cook broccoli, the more smelly compounds there will be, although broccoli will never be as odorous as cabbage or cauliflower. Keeping a lid on the pot will stop the smelly molecules from floating off into the air but will also accelerate the chemical reaction that turns green broccoli olive-drab. Chlorophyll, the pigment that makes green vegetables green, is sensitive to acids. When you heat broccoli, the chlorophyll in its florets and stalk reacts chemically with acids in the broccoli or in the cooking water to form pheophytin, which is brown. The pheophytin turns cooked broccoli olive-drab or (since broccoli contains some yellow carotenes) bronze. To keep broccoli green, you must reduce the interaction between the chlorophyll and the acids. One way to do this is to cook the broccoli in a large quantity of water, so the acids will be diluted, but this increases the loss of vitamin C.* Another alternative is to leave the lid off the pot so that the hydrogen atoms can float off into the air, but this allows the smelly sulfur compounds to escape, too. The best way is probably to steam the broccoli quickly with very little water, so it holds onto its vitamin C and cooks before there is time for reac- tion between chlorophyll and hydrogen atoms to occur. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Freezing. Frozen broccoli usually contains less vitamin C than fresh broccoli. The vitamin is lost when the broccoli is blanched to inactivate catalase and peroxidase, enzymes that would otherwise continue to ripen the broccoli in the freezer. On the other hand, according to researchers at Cornell University, blanching broccoli in a microwave oven—two cups of broccoli in three tablespoons of water for three minutes at 600 –700 watts—nearly doubles the amount of vitamin C retained. In experiments at Cornell, frozen broccoli blanched in a microwave kept 90 percent of its vitamin C, compared to 56 percent for broccoli blanched in a pot of boiling water on top of a stove. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Protection against some cancers. Naturally occurring chemicals (indoles, isothiocyanates, glucosinolates, dithiolethiones, and phenols) in Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, cauli- flower, and other cruciferous vegetables appear to reduce the risk of some forms of cancer, perhaps by preventing the formation of carcinogens in your body or by blocking cancer- causing substances from reaching or reacting with sensitive body tissues or by inhibiting the transformation of healthy cells to malignant ones. All cruciferous vegetables contain sulforaphane, a member of a family of chemicals known as isothiocyanates. In experiments with laboratory rats, sulforaphane appears to increase the body’s production of phase-2 enzymes, naturally occurring substances that inacti- vate and help eliminate carcinogens. At the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, 69 percent of the rats injected with a chemical known to cause mammary cancer developed tumors vs. only 26 percent of the rats given the carcinogenic chemical plus sulforaphane. To get a protective amount of sulforaphane from broccoli you would have to eat about two pounds a week. But in 1997, Johns Hopkins researchers discovered that broccoli seeds and three-day-old broccoli sprouts contain a compound converted to sulforaphane when the seed and sprout cells are crushed. Five grams of three-day-old sprouts contain as much sulphoraphane as 150 grams of mature broccoli. * Broccoli will lose large amounts of vitamin C if you cook it in water t hat is cold when you start. As it boils, water releases ox ygen t hat would ot her wise dest roy vitamin C, so you can cut t he vitamin loss dramat ically simply by lett ing t he water boil for 60 seconds before adding t he broccoli. Vision protection. In 2004, the Johns Hopkins researchers updated their findings on sulfora- phane to suggest that it may also protect cells in the eyes from damage due to ultraviolet light, thus reducing the risk of macular degeneration, the most common cause of age-related vision loss. Lower risk of some birth defects. Up to two or every 1,000 babies born in the United States each year may have cleft palate or a neural tube (spinal cord) defect due to their mothers’ not having gotten adequate amounts of folate during pregnancy. The current R DA for folate is 180 mcg for a woman, 200 mcg for a man, but the FDA now recommends 400 mcg for a woman who is or may become pregnant. Taking a folate supplement before becoming pregnant and continuing through the first two months of pregnancy reduces the risk of cleft palate; taking folate through the entire pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Broccoli is a good source of folate. One raw broccoli spear has 107 mcg folate, more than 50 percent of the R DA for an adult. Possible lower risk of heart attack. In the spring of 1998, an analysis of data from the records for more than 80,000 women enrolled in the long-running Nurses’ Health Study at Harvard School of Public Health/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, demonstrated that a diet providing more than 400 mcg folate and 3 mg vitamin B6 daily, either from food or supple- ments, might reduce a woman’s risk of heart attack by almost 50 percent. Although men were not included in the study, the results were assumed to apply to them as well. However, data from a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December 2006 called this theory into question. Researchers at Tulane Univer- sity examined the results of 12 controlled studies in which 16,958 patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease were given either folic acid supplements or placebos (“look-alike” pills with no folic acid) for at least six months. The scientists, who found no reduction in the risk of further heart disease or overall death rates among those taking folic acid, concluded that further studies will be required to ascertain whether taking folic acid supplements reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Possible inhibition of the herpes virus. Indoles, another group of chemicals in broccoli, may inhibit the growth of some herpes viruses. In 2003, at the 43rd annual Interscience Confer- ence on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, in Chicago, researchers from Stockholm’s Huddinge University Hospital, the University of Virginia, and Northeastern Ohio University reported that indole-3-carbinol (I3C) in broccoli stops cells, including those of the herpes sim- plex virus, from reproducing. In tests on monkey and human cells, I3C was nearly 100 percent effective in blocking reproduction of the HSV-1 (oral and genital herpes) and HSV-2 (genital herpes), including one strain known to be resistant to the antiviral drug acyclovir (Zovirax). Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Enlarged thyroid gland. Cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, contain goitrin, thio- cyanate, and isothiocyanate, chemical compounds that inhibit the formation of thyroid hormones and cause the thyroid to enlarge in an attempt to produce more. These chemicals, known collectively as goitrogens, are not hazardous for healthy people who eat moderate amounts of cruciferous vegetables, but they may pose problems for people who have thyroid problems or are taking thyroid medication. False-positive test for occult blood in the stool. The guaiac slide test for hidden blood in feces relies on alphaguaiaconic acid, a chemical that turns blue in the presence of blood. Broccoli contains peroxidase, a natural chemical that also turns alphaguaiaconic acid blue and may produce a positive test in people who do not actually have blood in the stool. Food/Drug Interactions Anticoagulants Broccoli is rich in vitamin K, the blood-clotting vitamin produced natu- rally by bacteria in the intestines. Consuming large quantities of this food may reduce the effectiveness of anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin). One cup of drained, boiled broccoli contains 220 mcg vitamin K, nearly four times the R DA for a healthy adult.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Low Protein: High Fat: Low Saturated fat: Low Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: High Fiber: High Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: Vitamin A, folate, vitamin C Major mineral contribution: Potassium, iron About the Nutrients in This Food Brussels sprouts are high in dietary fiber, especially insoluble cellulose and lignan in the leaf ribs. They are also a good source of vitamin A and vitamin C. One-half cup cooked fresh brussels sprouts has three grams of dietary fiber, 1,110 IU vitamin A (48 percent of the R DA for a woman, 37 percent of the R DA for a man), 47 mcg folate (16 percent of the R DA), and 48 mg vitamin C (64 percent of the R DA for a woman, 53 percent of the R DA for a man). Brussels sprouts also contain an antinutrient, a natural chemical that splits the thiamin (vitamin B1) molecule so that it is no longer nutritionally useful. This thiamin inhibitor is inactivated by cooking. The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food Fresh, lightly steamed to preserve the vitamin C and inactivate the antinutrient. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Antiflatulence diet Low-fiber diet Buying This Food Look for: Firm, compact heads with bright, dark-green leaves, sold loose so that you can choose the sprouts one at a time. Brussels sprouts are available all year round. Avoid: Puff y, soft sprouts with yellow or wilted leaves. The yellow carotenes in the leaves show through only when the leaves age and their green chlorophyll pigments fade. Wilting leaves and puff y, soft heads are also signs of aging. Avoid sprouts with tiny holes in the leaves through which insects have burrowed. Storing This Food Store the brussels sprouts in the refrigerator. While they are most nutritious if used soon after harvesting, sprouts will keep their vitamins (including their heat-sensitive vitamin C) for several weeks in the refrigerator. Store the sprouts in a plastic bag or covered bowl to protect them from moisture loss. Preparing This Food First, drop the sprouts into salted ice water to flush out any small bugs hiding inside. Next, trim them. Remove yellow leaves and leaves with dark spots or tiny holes, but keep as many of the darker, vitamin A–rich outer leaves as possible. Then, cut an X into the stem end of the sprouts to allow heat and water in so that the sprouts cook faster. What Happens When You Cook This Food Brussels sprouts contain mustard oils (isothiocyanates), natural chemicals that break down into a variety of smelly sulfur compounds (including hydrogen sulfide and ammonia) when the sprouts are heated, a reaction that is intensified in aluminum pots. The longer you cook the sprouts, the more smelly compounds there will be. Adding a slice of bread to the cook- ing water may lessen the odor; keeping a lid on the pot will stop the smelly molecules from floating off into the air. But keeping the pot covered will also increase the chemical reaction that turns cooked brussels sprouts drab. Chlorophyll, the pigment that makes green vegetables green, is sensi- tive to acids. When you heat brussels sprouts, the chlorophyll in their green leaves reacts chemically with acids in the sprouts or in the cooking water to form pheophytin, which is brown. The pheophytin turns cooked brussels sprouts olive or, since they also contain yel- low carotenes, bronze. To keep cooked brussels sprouts green, you have to reduce the interaction between chlorophyll and acids. One way to do this is to cook the sprouts in a lot of water, so the acids will be diluted, but this increases the loss of vitamin C.* Another alternative is to leave the lid off the pot so that the hydrogen atoms can float off into the air, but this allows the smelly sulfur compounds to escape, too. The best solution is to steam the sprouts quickly in very little water, so they retain their vitamin C and cook before there is time for reaction between chlorophyll and hydrogen atoms to occur. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Freezing. Frozen brussels sprouts contain virtually the same amounts of vitamins as fresh boiled sprouts. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Protection against cancer. Naturally occurring chemicals (indoles, isothiocyanates, gluco- sinolates, dithiolethiones, and phenols) in brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and other cruciferous vegetables appear to reduce the risk of some cancers, perhaps by pre- venting the formation of carcinogens in your body or by blocking cancer-causing substances from reaching or reacting with sensitive body tissues or by inhibiting the transformation of healthy cells to malignant ones. All cruciferous vegetables contain sulforaphane, a member of a family of chemicals known as isothiocyanates. In experiments with laboratory rats, sulforaphane appears to increase the body’s production of phase-2 enzymes, naturally occurring substances that inac- tivate and help eliminate carcinogens. At Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, 69 percent of the rats injected with a chemical known to cause mammary cancer developed tumors vs. only 26 percent of the rats given the carcinogenic chemical plus sulforaphane. In 1997, the Johns Hopkins researchers discovered that broccoli seeds and three- day-old broccoli sprouts contain a compound converted to sulforaphane when the seed and sprout cells are crushed. Five grams of three-day-old broccoli sprouts contain as much sulforaphane as 150 grams of mature broccoli. The sulforaphane levels in other cruciferous vegetables have not yet been calculated. Lower risk of some birth defects. Up to two or every 1,000 babies born in the United States each year may have cleft palate or a neural tube (spinal cord) defect due to their mothers’ not having gotten adequate amounts of folate during pregnancy. NOTE : The current R DA for folate is 180 mcg for a woman and 200 mcg for a man, but the FDA now recommends * Brussels sprouts will lose as much as 25 percent of their vitamin C if you cook them in water that is cold when you start. As it boils, water releases oxygen that would otherwise destroy vitamin C. You can cut the vitamin loss dramatically simply by letting the water boil for 60 seconds before adding the sprouts. 400 mcg for a woman who is or may become pregnant. Taking a folate supplement before becoming pregnant and continuing through the first two months of pregnancy reduces the risk of cleft palate; taking folate through the entire pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Possible lower risk of heart attack. In the spring of 1998, an analysis of data from the records for more than 80,000 women enrolled in the long-running Nurses’ Health Study at Harvard School of Public Health/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, demonstrated that a diet providing more than 400 mcg folate and 3 mg vitamin B6 daily, either from food or supple- ments, might reduce a woman’s risk of heart attack by almost 50 percent. Although men were not included in the study, the results were assumed to apply to them as well. However, data from a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December 2006 called this theory into question. Researchers at Tulane Univer- sity examined the results of 12 controlled studies in which 16,958 patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease were given either folic acid supplements or placebos (“look-alike” pills with no folic acid) for at least six months. The scientists, who found no reduction in the risk of further heart disease or overall death rates among those taking folic acid, concluded that further studies will be required to verif y whether taking folic acid supplements reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Vision protection. In 2004, the Johns Hopkins researchers updated their findings on sulfora- phane to suggest that it may also protect cells in the eyes from damage due to ultraviolet light, thus reducing the risk of macular degeneration, the most common cause of age-related vision loss. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Enlarged thyroid gland (goiter). Cruciferous vegetables, including brussels sprouts, contain goitrin, thiocyanate, and isothiocyanate. These chemicals, known collectively as goitrogens, inhibit the formation of thyroid hormones and cause the thyroid to enlarge in an attempt to produce more. Goitrogens are not hazardous for healthy people who eat moderate amounts of cruciferous vegetables, but they may pose problems for people who have a thyroid condi- tion or are taking thyroid medication. Intestinal gas. Bacteria that live naturally in the gut degrade the indigestible carbohydrates (food fiber) in brussels sprouts and produce gas that some people find distressing. Food/Drug Interactions Anticoagulants Brussels sprouts are rich in vitamin K, the blood-clotting vitamin produced naturally by bacteria in the intestines. Consuming large quantities of this food may reduce the effectiveness of anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin). One cup of drained, boiled brussels sprouts contains 219 mcg vitamin K, nearly three times the R DA for a healthy adult.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Beneficial Teas

Buchu Tea has a long healing history among the tribes of southern Africa , being effective for urinary tract infections. It also has diuretic, antispasmodic, tonic, antibacterial and stimulant properties. Buchu Tea description Buchu is a small, green, woody plant originating from South Africa. It possesses smooth, thick leaves that have a pungent aroma and fragrance. Buchu is grown for medicinal purposes, owing healing properties especially for the kidney, urinary tract and bladder. Buchu is also mixed with other herbs to alleviate coughs, colds and hangovers. Buchu tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Buchu Tea brewing To prepare Buchu tea:
  • Immerse 2 teaspoons of dried buchu leaves into 18 ounces of boiling water.
  • Let the mixture soak for about 10 minutes.
  • Drink it slowly.
The resulting tea is tasty and may be consumed up to three times a day. Buchu Tea benefits Buchu tea has been successfully used to:
  • treat certain prostate disorders
  • regulate blood sugar
  • lower blood pressure
  • help digestion
  • eliminate flatulence and bloating
  • reduce inflammation, tightness and swelling of the joints
Buchu Tea side effects Studies proved that Buchu tea should not be consumed by pregnant women, because it may cause uterine contraction. Buchu tea is a healthy beverage well known for its medicinal action against flatulence and bloating. Due to its tasty flavor, it is also used as a treat.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Buckthorn tea is efficient in dealing with a large array of ailments such as constipation, intestinal worms, rheumatism, but not only. Buckthorn Tea description Buckthorn, or black alder, is a herb coming from the bark, the stems and the branches of the rhamnus frangula tree. Buckthorn is a herbal remedy for bowel disorders. Buckthorn is also used as a health tonic and was primary consumed for its “blood purifying” and diuretic properties. It can be found as capsules, liquid, tablet or tea form. Buckthorn tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Buckthorn Tea brewing To prepare Buckthorn tea:
  • add one spoon of mashed buckthorn bark to a cup of boiling water
  • cover it for 15 minutes
  • boil it for another 15 minutes
  • filter the brew while it is still hot
  • drink it before bedtime
It is recommended not to consume this type of tea for more than a year. Buckthorn Tea benefits Buckthorn tea has been successfully used to:
  • assist in moving bowels and to relieve constipation (particularly those caused by insufficiency of bile)
  • help in treating liver disorders
  • treat rheumatism
  • purge intestinal worms
  • combat skin disorders associated with constipation (eczema, acne and psoriasis)
Buckthorn Tea side effects Consuming untreated fresh buckthorn irritates the protective mucosa lining in the stomach and may cause severe gastrointestinal irritations, spasms, vomiting, diarrhea and colic. Buckthorn tea should not be taken on a long-term basis. Pregnant or nursing women should consult a health care provider before using this type of tea. Buckthorn tea is largely used for its medicinal action against constipation and for treating the skin disorders associated with it. It can be taken as tea, capsules, liquid and tablet.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Bugleweed Tea  is an important ingredient in the field of modern alternative medicine because it proved its efficiency against thyroid problems, as well as breast pain. Bugleweed Tea description Bugleweed is a low-growing flowering plant from the mint family, native to Europe. It is also known as sweet bugle and it grows in marshlands. The bugleweed has oval-shaped leaves which resemble spinach leaves. Bugleweed flowers grow in clusters and have a pink to blue color. This plant has a fresh, mild, mint-like aroma. The leaves and flowers are used for medicinal purposes. Bugleweed tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Bugleweed Tea brewing To prepare Bugleweed tea:
  • add one teaspoonful of dried bugleweed herbs to a cup of boiling water
  • allow the mixture to steep for 10-15 minutes
Bugleweed tea may be drunk three times a day. Also, it can be applied topically either as tincture or as poultice. Bugleweed Tea benefits Bugleweed tea has been successfully used to:
  • treat hyperthyroidism
  • alleviate cyclic breast pain in women by moderating estrogen levels
  • sedate and calm the nerves
  • suppress cough and fighting tuberculosis and other disorders of the lungs
  • moderate a rapid heart rate
  • remove excess fluid in the body and promote better circulation
  • accelerate the healing of bruises and other wounds (when applied topically)
Bugleweed Tea side effects Bugleweed tea should not be consumed by pregnant or nursing women. Bugleweed tea is a herbal remedy for a large array of diseases, being best known for its healing properties against hyperthyroidism, breast pain and lungs disorders.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Bupleurum tea is largely known for its healing propertiesand its action against the growth and spreading of cancer cells. Bupleurum Tea description Bupleurum is a plant from the Apiaceae family, originating from Asia. The roots of Bupleurum are used in various healing mixtures throughout China and East Asia. Scientists have shown that this plant possesses anti-inflammatory constituents and may inhibit the growth of liver cancer cells. Both Japan and China medicinal industries use it in order to treat cancer and hepatitis. Bupleurum tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Bupleurum Tea brewing Bupleurum tea can be prepared by combining dried and chopped bupleurum roots with hot water. After steeping the mixture for about 10 minutes, drink it slowly. Bupleurum herb can also be consumed as extracts and capsules. Buplerum Tea benefits Bupleurum tea has been successfully used to:
  • treat liver problems like hepatitis, cirrhosis and cancer
  • treat infections with fever
  • relieve chest congestion
  • treat indigestion
  • treat hemorrhoids
  • treat uterine and anal prolapse
  • treat diarrhea
  • help in overall efforts to treat HIV
Bupleurum Tea side effects Bupleurum tea is not recommended to pregnant and breastfeeding women. Bupleurum tea is a healthy beverage used efficiently to treat liver-related diseases. It has been also proven that this type of tea can fight free radicals, responsible for cancer cells growth, due to its content of antioxidants.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Nowadays, burdock tea is largely consumed all over the world. It is successfully used to improve appetite and digestion, but not only. Burdock Tea description Burdock is a plant from the same family as the sunflower, which can grow up to five feet high. In the summer, the seeds are cropped and the roots are dug up. In traditional Chinese medicine, but not only, it is combined with other herbs to treat upper-respiratory tract infections. Burdock root is known to be a blood purifier, clearing several problems from the body’s systems. Burdock can be taken as infusion, decoction, extract, tincture and ointment. Burdock tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Burdock Tea brewing To prepare Burdock tea:
  • Pour boiling water over the desired amount of herbs.
  • Cover and let them steep 10 to 20 minutes.
  • Strain off the herbs using a tea strainer or coffee filter.
It is essential to use good quality water and it is recommended to drink it slowly. Burdock Tea benefits Burdock tea has been successfully used to:
  • soothe the skin and gastrointestinal tract
  • improve appetite and digestion
  • reduce liver damage
  • mildly lower blood sugar (hypoglycemic effect)
  • purify the blood
  • fight the effects of rheumatism
  • treat some kidney disorders
  • counter bronchial cough and other irritations of the pulmonary tract
Burdock Tea side effects Burdock tea is not advised to be consumed by pregnant or nursing women. Burdock tea is a medicinal remedy for a large array of diseases. Studies have revealed its efficiency in dealing with liver and kidney ailments, as well as its soothing effects for the skin.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Butternut Bark tea has a long history in healing ailments like constipation, but not only. It is said that native Americans discovered its medicinal properties and used the plant to treat toothaches. Butternut Bark Tea description Butternut, or white walnut or oilnut, is a small tree, commonly found in the Midwestern and Northeastern regions of the United States. It grows on hillsides or streambanks. The butternut tree is valued for its nuts as well as for the lumber. To treat toothaches, Native Americans used the oil of the butternut tree. Medicinally, only the inner bark of the root is used. Butternut Bark tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Butternut Bark Tea brewing To prepare Butternut Bark tea:
  • boil a teaspoon of the bark in a cup of water
  • let it steep for 3 to 5 minutes
Butternut Bark tea can also be purchased in powdered form and taken with cold water. Butternut Bark Tea benefits Butternut Bark tea has been successfully used to:
  • relieve constipation
  • expel parasites
  • help in the treatment of gallbladder disorders
  • help in the treatment of hemorrhoids
  • help against certain skin diseases
  • protect the liver
  • cleanse the blood
  • cleanse the colon
Butternut Bark Tea side effects Butternut Bark tea intakingis not recommended in case of gallstones. Also, pregnant and nursing women should ask their doctor before consuming it. Butternut Bark tea is a natural remedy against constipation and parasites, being also useful in case of skin diseases.... Beneficial Teas

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

(Bok choy [Chinese cabbage], green cabbage, red cabbage, savoy cabbage) See also Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Lettuce, Radishes, Spinach, Turnips. Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Low Protein: Moderate Fat: Low Saturated fat: Low Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: High Fiber: Low Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: Vitamin A, folate, vitamin C Major mineral contribution: Calcium (moderate) About the Nutrients in This Food All cabbage has some dietary fiber food: insoluble cellulose and lignin in the ribs and structure of the leaves. Depending on the variety, it has a little vitamin A, moderate amounts of the B vitamin folate and vitamin C. One-half cup shredded raw bok choy has 0.1 g dietary fiber, 1,041 IU vitamin A (45 percent of the R DA for a woman, 35 percent of the R DA for a man), and 15.5 mg vitamin C (21 percent of the R DA for a woman, 17 percent of the R DA for a man). One-half cup shredded raw green cabbage has 0.5 g dietary fiber, 45 IU vitamin A (1.9 percent of the R DA for a woman, 1.5 percent of the R DA for a man), 15 mcg folate (4 percent of the R DA), and 11 mg vitamin C (15 percent of the R DA for a woman, 12 percent of the R DA for a man). One-half cup chopped raw red cabbage has 0.5 g dietary fiber, 7 mcg folate (2 percent of the R DA), and 20 mg vitamin C (27 percent of the R DA for a woman, 22 percent of the R DA for a man). One-half cup chopped raw savoy cabbage has one gram dietary fiber, 322 IU vitamin A (14 percent of the R DA for a woman, 11 percent of the R DA for a man), and 11 mg vitamin C (15 percent of the R DA for a woman, 12 percent of the R DA for a man). Raw red cabbage contains an antinutrient enzyme that splits the thiamin molecule so that the vitamin is no longer nutritionally useful. This thiamin in hibitor is inactivated by cooking. The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food Raw or lightly steamed to protect the vitamin C. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Antiflatulence diet Low-fiber diet Buying This Food Look for: Cabbages that feel heavy for their size. The leaves should be tightly closed and attached tightly at the stem end. The outer leaves on a savoy cabbage may curl back from the head, but the center leaves should still be relatively tightly closed. Also look for green cabbages that still have their dark-green, vitamin-rich outer leaves. Avoid: Green and savoy cabbage with yellow or wilted leaves. The yellow carotene pig- ments show through only when the cabbage has aged and its green chlorophyll pigments have faded. Wilted leaves mean a loss of moisture and vitamins. Storing This Food Handle cabbage gently; bruising tears cells and activates ascorbic acid oxidase, an enzyme in the leaves that hastens the destruction of vitamin C. Store cabbage in a cool, dark place, preferably a refrigerator. In cold storage, cabbage can retain as much as 75 percent of its vitamin C for as long as six months. Cover the cabbage to keep it from drying out and losing vitamin A. Preparing This Food Do not slice the cabbage until you are ready to use it; slicing tears cabbage cells and releases the enzyme that hastens the oxidation and destruction of vitamin C. If you plan to serve cooked green or red cabbage in wedges, don’t cut out the inner core that hold the leaves together. To separate the leaves for stuffing, immerse the entire head in boiling water for a few minutes, then lift it out and let it drain until it is cool enough to handle comfortably. The leaves should pull away easily. If not, put the cabbage back into the hot water for a few minutes. What Happens When You Cook This Food Cabbage contains mustard oils (isothiocyanates) that break down into a variet y of smelly sulfur compounds (including hydrogen sulfide and ammon ia) when the cabbage is heated, a reaction that occurs more strongly in aluminum pots. The longer you cook the cabbage, the more smelly the compounds will be. Adding a slice of bread to the cooking water may lessen the odor. Keeping a lid on the pot will stop the smelly molecules from floating off into the air, but it will also accelerate the chemical reaction that turns cooked green cabbage drab. Chlorophyll, the pigment that makes green vegetables green, is sensitive to acids. When you heat green cabbage, the chlorophyll in its leaves reacts chemically with acids in the cabbage or in the cooking water to form pheophytin, which is brown. The pheophytin gives the cooked cabbage its olive color. To keep cooked green cabbage green, you have to reduce the interaction between the chlorophyll and the acids. One way to do this is to cook the cabbage in a large quantity of water, so the acids will be diluted, but this increases the loss of vitamin C.* Another alternative is to leave the lid off the pot so that the volatile acids can float off into the air, but this allows the smelly sulfur compounds to escape too. The best way may be to steam the cabbage ver y quickly in ver y little water so that it keeps its vitamin C and cooks before there is time for the chlorophyll/acid reaction to occur. Red cabbage is colored with red anthocyanins, pigments that turn redder in acids (lemon juice, vinegar) and blue purple in bases (alkaline chemicals such as baking soda). To keep the cabbage red, make sweet-and-sour cabbage. But be careful not to make it in an iron or aluminum pot, since vinegar (which contains tannins) will react with these metals to create dark pigments that discolor both the pot and the vegetable. Glass, stainless-steel, or enameled pots do not produce this reaction. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Pickling. Sauerkraut is a fermented and pickled produce made by immersing cabbage in a salt solution strong enough to kill off pathological bacteria but allow beneficial ones to sur- vive, breaking down proteins in the cabbage and producing the acid that gives sauerkraut its distinctive flavor. Sauerkraut contains more than 37 times as much sodium as fresh cabbage (661 mg sodium/100 grams canned sauerkraut with liquid) but only one third the vitamin C and one-seventh the vitamin A. * According to USDA, if you cook t hree cups of cabbage in one cup of water you will lose only 10 percent of t he vitamin C; reverse t he rat io to four t imes as much water as cabbage and you will lose about 50 percent of t he vitamin C. Cabbage will lose as much as 25 percent of its vitamin C if you cook it in water t hat is cold when you start. As it boils, water releases ox ygen t hat would ot her wise dest roy vitamin C, so you can cut t he vitamin loss dramat ically simply by lett ing t he water boil for 60 seconds before adding t he cabbage. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Protection against certain cancers. Naturally occurring chemicals (indoles, isothiocyanates, glucosinolates, dithiolethiones, and phenols) in cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauli- flower, and other cruciferous vegetables appear to reduce the risk of some cancers, perhaps by preventing the formation of carcinogens in your body or by blocking cancer-causing substances from reaching or reacting with sensitive body tissues or by inhibiting the trans- formation of healthy cells to malignant ones. All cruciferous vegetables contain sulforaphane, a member of a family of chemicals known as isothiocyanates. In experiments with laboratory rats, sulforaphane appears to increase the body’s production of phase-2 enzymes, naturally occurring substances that inac- tivate and help eliminate carcinogens. At Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, 69 percent of the rats injected with a chemical known to cause mammary cancer developed tumors vs. only 26 percent of the rats given the carcinogenic chemical plus sulforaphane. In 1997, Johns Hopkins researchers discovered that broccoli seeds and three-day-old broccoli sprouts contain a compound converted to sulforaphane when the seed and sprout cells are crushed. Five grams of three-day-old broccoli sprouts contain as much sulforaphane as 150 grams of mature broccoli. The sulforaphane levels in other cruciferous vegetables have not yet been calculated. Vision protection. In 2004, the Johns Hopkins researchers updated their findings on sulfora- phane to suggest that it may also protect cells in the eyes from damage due to ultraviolet light, thus reducing the risk of macular degeneration, the most common cause of age-related vision loss. Lower risk of some birth defects. As many as two of every 1,000 babies born in the United States each year may have cleft palate or a neural tube (spinal cord) defect due to their moth- ers’ not having gotten adequate amounts of folate during pregnancy. The current R DA for folate is 180 mcg for a woman and 200 mcg for a man, but the FDA now recommends 400 mcg for a woman who is or may become pregnant. Taking a folate supplement before becom- ing pregnant and through the first two months of pregnancy reduces the risk of cleft palate; taking folate through the entire pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Possible lower risk of heart attack. In the spring of 1998, an analysis of data from the records for more than 80,000 women enrolled in the long-running Nurses’ Health Study at Harvard School of Public Health/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, demonstrated that a diet providing more than 400 mcg folate and 3 mg vitamin B6 daily, either from food or supple- ments, might reduce a woman’s risk of heart attack by almost 50 percent. Although men were not included in the study, the results were assumed to apply to them as well. However, data from a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December 2006 called this theory into question. Researchers at Tulane Univer- sity examined the results of 12 controlled studies in which 16,958 patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease were given either folic acid supplements or placebos (“look-alike” pills with no folic acid) for at least six months. The scientists, who found no reduction in the risk of further heart disease or overall death rates among those taking folic acid, concluded that further studies will be required to verif y whether taking folic acid supplements reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Enlarged thyroid gland (goiter). Cruciferous vegetables, including cabbage, contain goitrin, thiocyanate, and isothiocyanate. These chemicals, known collectively as goitrogens, inhibit the formation of thyroid hormones and cause the thyroid to enlarge in an attempt to pro- duce more. Goitrogens are not hazardous for healthy people who eat moderate amounts of cruciferous vegetables, but they may pose problems for people who have a thyroid condition or are taking thyroid medication. Intestinal gas. Bacteria that live naturally in the gut degrade the indigestible carbohydrates (food fiber) in cabbage, producing gas that some people find distressing. Food/Drug Interactions Anticoagulants Cabbage contains vitamin K, the blood-clotting vitamin produced natu- rally by bacteria in the intestines. Consuming large quantities of this food may reduce the effectiveness of anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin). One cup of shredded common green cabbage contains 163 mcg vitamin K, nearly three times the R DA for a healthy adult; one cup of drained boiled common green cabbage contains 73 mcg vita- min K, slightly more than the R DA for a healthy adult. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are drugs used to treat depression. They inactivate naturally occurring enzymes in your body that metabolize tyra- mine, a substance found in many fermented or aged foods. Tyramine constricts blood vessels and increases blood pressure. If you eat a food such as sauerkraut which is high in tyramine while you are taking an M AO inhibitor, you cannot effectively eliminate the tyramine from your body. The result may be a hypertensive crisis.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Medical Dictionary

The operation used to deliver a baby through its mother’s abdominal wall. It is performed when the risks to mother or child of vaginal delivery are thought to outweigh the problems associated with operative delivery. One of the most common reasons for Caesarean section is ‘disproportion’ between the size of the fetal head and the maternal pelvis. The need for a Caesarean should be assessed anew in each pregnancy; a woman who has had a Caesarean section in the past will not automatically need to have one for subsequent deliveries. Caesarean-section rates vary dramatically from hospital to hospital, and especially between countries, emphasising that the criteria for operative delivery are not universally agreed. The current rate in the UK is about 23 per cent, and in the USA, about 28 per cent. The rate has shown a steady rise in all countries over the last decade. Fear of litigation by patients is one reason for this rise, as is the uncertainty that can arise from abnormalities seen on fetal monitoring during labour. Recent research suggesting that vaginal delivery is becoming more hazardous as the age of motherhood rises may increase the pressure from women to have a Caesarean section – as well as pressure from obstetricians.

The operation is usually performed through a low, horizontal ‘bikini line’ incision. A general anaesthetic in a heavily pregnant woman carries increased risks, so the operation is often performed under regional – epidural or spinal – ANAESTHESIA. This also allows the mother to see her baby as soon as it is born, and the baby is not exposed to agents used for general anaesthesia. If a general anaesthetic is needed (usually in an emergency), exposure to these agents may make the baby drowsy for some time afterwards.

Another problem with delivery by Caesarean section is, of course, that the mother must recover from the operation whilst coping with the demands of a small baby. (See PREGNANCY AND LABOUR.)... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Calamus tea is a good remedy against a large array of ailments such as laryngitis, but not only. It has a good taste when drank and it can fight the desire for tobacco. Calamus Tea description Calamus is a perennial semi-aquatic plant that grows in wetlands. It is found in Europe, Russia, East and South Asia, and the United States and Canada. Its leaves and rhizomes have a strong scent, due to which Calamus is appreciated in the perfume industry. Calamus tea is the resulting beverage from brewing the abovementioned plant. Calamus Tea brewing To prepare Calamus tea:
  • pour a cup of boiling water on 2 teaspoonfuls of the calamus root
  • leave it to steep for about 10 to 15 minutes
Calamus tea is recommended to be drunk an hour before eating. Calamus Tea benefits Calamus tea has been successfully used to:
  • treat chest congestion
  • treat digestive problems (flatulence and bloating)
  • relieve stomach spasms
  • enhance the appetite
  • treat laryngitis
  • fight the desire for tobacco
  • fight fever
Calamus Tea side effects Calamus tea is not recommended to pregnant or nursing women. Calamus tea is a medicinal beverage efficient in dealing with stomach spasms, digestive problems and chest congestion.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

The metallic element present in chalk and other forms of lime. The chief preparations used in medicine are calcium carbonate (chalk), calcium chloride, calcium gluconate, calcium hydroxide (slaked lime), liquor of calcium hydroxide (lime-water), calcium lactate, and calcium phosphate. Calcium gluconate is freely soluble in water and is used in conditions in which calcium should be given by injection.

Calcium is a most important element in diet; the chief sources of it are milk and cheese. Calcium is especially needed by the growing child and the pregnant and nursing mother. The uptake of calcium by the baby is helped by vitamin D (see APPENDIX 5: VITAMINS). A de?ciency of calcium may cause TETANY, and an excess may result in the development of CALCULI (stones) in the KIDNEYS or gallbladder (see LIVER).

The recommended daily intakes of calcium are: 500 mg for children, 700 mg for adolescents, 500–900 mg for adults and 1,200 mg for pregnant or nursing mothers.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

California Poppy tea is a natural remedy against insomnia. It is largely used for its healing properties against anxiety, too. California Poppy Tea description California poppy is an annual or perennial plant, originating from the Pacific coast. Its orange-yellow flowers flourish during spring and midsummer. North Americans used to consume this plant for stress-caused illnesses. Landscape artists appreciate California poppy plant for its beauty. California Poppy tea is the beverage resulting from brewing the abovementioned plant. California Poppy Tea brewing To prepare California Poppy tea, place the flowers, stems and leaves in boiling water for about 10 minutes. California Poppy Tea benefits California Poppy tea has been successfully used to:
  • fight insomnia by ushering in restful sleep
  • fight anxiety
  • fight headaches
  • fight toothaches and stomachaches
  • fight skin sores and ulcers
California Poppy Tea side effects Pregnant women and children should not consume California Poppy tea. California Poppy tea is a healthy beverage able to deal with a large array of diseases such as stomachaches and ulcers and it also proved to be helpful for skin sores.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Caraway tea is well known for its carminative, antispasmodic and diuretic action, being consumed worldwide due to its pharmaceutical benefits. Caraway Tea description Caraway is a biennial plant which distinguishes itself through an erect branching stem. It grows wild in Europe, North Africa and Asia. Caraway is best known for its long, brownish and rib-shaped seeds, which are used as a condiment to add flavor to several types of food like soups, pasta, breads, cheeses, cakes, biscuits, rice and seafood. Caraway is also part of the Indian, Dutch, German, Russian, and Scandinavian dishes. Caraway is available in capsule form and through brewing it turns into Caraway tea. Caraway Tea brewing To prepare Caraway tea:
  • Infuse 1 teaspoon of crushed caraway seeds into a cup of boiling water.
  • Allow this mix to steep for 10 to 15 minutes.
Caraway tea can be drunk three times a day. Caraway Tea benefits Caraway tea is successfully used to:
  • soothe the digestive tract and relieve colic, cramps and flatulence
  • promote gastric secretion and improve the appetite
  • fight diarrhea
  • ease menstrual cramps, as well as gallbladder spasms
  • fight bronchitis and cough
  • increase the production of breast milk
  • freshen the breath
Caraway Tea side effects Pregnant and nursing women should ask their doctor before consuming Caraway tea. Caraway tea is a healthy beverage, efficient in dealing with cramps, colic and flatulence, but not only.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

This is a colourless, odourless, tasteless, nonirritating gas formed on incomplete combustion of organic fuels. Exposure to CO is frequently due to defective gas, oil or solid-fuel heating appliances. CO is a component of car exhaust fumes and deliberate exposure to these is a common method of suicide. Victims of ?res often su?er from CO poisoning. CO combines reversibly with oxygen-carrying sites of HAEMOGLOBIN (Hb) molecules with an a?nity 200 to 300 times greater than oxygen itself. The carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) formed becomes unavailable for oxygen transportation. In addition the partial saturation of the Hb molecule results in tighter oxygen binding, impairing delivery to the tissues. CO also binds to MYOGLOBIN and respiratory cytochrome enzymes. Exposure to CO at levels of 500 parts per million (ppm) would be expected to cause mild symptoms only and exposure to levels of 4,000 ppm would be rapidly fatal.

Each year around 50 people in the United Kingdom are reported as dying from carbon monoxide poisoning, and experts have suggested that as many as 25,000 people a year are exposed to its e?ects within the home, but most cases are unrecognised, unreported and untreated, even though victims may su?er from long-term e?ects. This is regrettable, given that Napoleon’s surgeon, Larrey, recognised in the 18th century that soldiers were being poisoned by carbon monoxide when billeted in huts heated by woodburning stoves. In the USA it is estimated that 40,000 people a year attend emergency departments su?ering from carbon monoxide poisoning. So prevention is clearly an important element in dealing with what is sometimes termed the ‘silent killer’. Safer designs of houses and heating systems, as well as wider public education on the dangers of carbon monoxide and its sources, are important.

Clinical e?ects of acute exposure resemble those of atmospheric HYPOXIA. Tissues and organs with high oxygen consumption are a?ected to a great extent. Common e?ects include headaches, weakness, fatigue, ?ushing, nausea, vomiting, irritability, dizziness, drowsiness, disorientation, incoordination, visual disturbances, TACHYCARDIA and HYPERVENTILATION. In severe cases drowsiness may progress rapidly to COMA. There may also be metabolic ACIDOSIS, HYPOKALAEMIA, CONVULSIONS, HYPOTENSION, respiratory depression, ECG changes and cardiovascular collapse. Cerebral OEDEMA is common and will lead to severe brain damage and focal neurological signs. Signi?cant abnormalities on physical examination include impaired short-term memory, abnormal Rhomberg’s test (standing unsupported with eyes closed) and unsteadiness of gait including heel-toe walking. Any one of these signs would classify the episode as severe. Victims’ skin may be coloured pink, though this is very rarely seen even in severe incidents. The venous blood may look ‘arterial’. Patients recovering from acute CO poisoning may su?er neurological sequelae including TREMOR, personality changes, memory impairment, visual loss, inability to concentrate and PARKINSONISM. Chronic low-level exposures may result in nausea, fatigue, headache, confusion, VOMITING, DIARRHOEA, abdominal pain and general malaise. They are often misdiagnosed as in?uenza or food poisoning.

First-aid treatment is to remove the victim from the source of exposure, ensure an e?ective airway and give 100-per-cent oxygen by tight-?tting mask. In hospital, management is largely suppportive, with oxygen administration. A blood sample for COHb level determination should be taken as soon as practicable and, if possible, before oxygen is given. Ideally, oxygen therapy should continue until the COHb level falls below 5 per cent. Patients with any history of unconsciousness, a COHb level greater than 20 per cent on arrival, any neurological signs, any cardiac arrhythmias or anyone who is pregnant should be referred for an expert opinion about possible treatment with hyperbaric oxygen, though this remains a controversial therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy shortens the half-life of COHb, increases plasma oxygen transport and reverses the clinical e?ects resulting from acute exposures. Carbon monoxide is also an environmental poison and a component of cigarette smoke. Normal body COHb levels due to ENDOGENOUS CO production are 0.4 to

0.7 per cent. Non-smokers in urban areas may have level of 1–2 per cent as a result of environmental exposure. Smokers may have a COHb level of 5 to 6 per cent.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Cascara Sagrada Tea has been known since ancient times as a great stimulant and laxative agent. In fact, the ones to discover its medical benefits were the American. The first proofs of this fact date from the 17th century, when American practitioners used Cascara Sagrada bark to treat many bacterial ailments of the digestive system. Cascara is a small shrub that grows mainly in the North America, in states like Idaho, California or Montana. Cascara never grows taller than 50 centimeters and has pale yellow greenish leaves and deep green leaves. Also known as rhamnus purshiana, Cascara has purple fruits or black berries that hide usually three hard seeds. Cascara Sagrada is harvested in the fall and can only be used dried (one year apart from the harvesting time) in order to release its curative benefits. Many people in Northern America specialize in Cascara Sagrada harvesting and herb processing (the plant needs to be properly dried and according to a list of specifications). Cascara Sagrada Tea Properties Cascara Sagrada Tea is known for its strong, stimulant and laxative properties. The main substances of this tea are very efficient in cases of nervous system failures and intestinal tract ailments. Cascara Sagrada Tea has a very bitter and therefore unpleasant taste. That’s why most people prefer to take it as capsules or extracts. Cascara Sagrada Tea Benefits Aside from its use as a constipation treatment, Cascara Sagrada Tea can also cure a variety of diseases involving the digestive tract, such as intestinal parasites or bacterial infections. However, make sure that you take this tea responsibly and don’t forget that this is a medical treatment wich only should be taking while you’re sick. Don’t try to replace your morning coffee with Cascara Sagrada Tea or you’ll face a series of complications! How to make Cascara Sagrada Tea Infusion When preparing Cascara Sagrada Tea, you have to make sure that you only use ingredients from a trusted provider. Nowadays, there are many illegal substances on the market sold as tea. Also, the herb you bought may be exactly what the label says it is, but not properly dried, in which case you’ll suffer from unwanted complications as well. Once you have the right ingredients, use a teaspoon of dried herbs for every cup of tea you want to make, add boiling water and wait 20 minutes for the wonderful benefits to be released. Strain the decoction and drink it hot or cold. You may also add honey or even sugar if the taste feels a bit unpleasant. Cascara Sagrada Tea Side Effects When taken in small amounts, Cascara Sagrada Tea is a safe treatment. However, high dosages may lead to various problems, such as urine discoloration, blood in stools, pain and vomiting. Make sure the dosage you’re using is the appropriate one or ask your doctor before making any moves: it’s better to be safe than sorry! Cascara Sagrada Contraindications Cascara Sagrada Tea is not recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women, patients suffering from appendicitis or ulcerative colitis. Also, if you are on blood thinners or anticoagulants, avoid taking a treatment based on Cascara Sagrada Tea. To gather more information, talk to an herbalist or to your doctor! If he gives you the green light and you happen to be in a teashop, add Cascara Sagrada Tea to your shopping cart and enjoy its wonderful benefits responsibly!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Centaury Tea has been known for centuries as a great medicinal remedy. It is said that Centaury plant is a very powerful diaphoretic, digestive, emetic, febrifuge, hepatic, homeopathic, poultice, stomachic, tonic and liver stimulator. Centaury is a plant from the gentian family which grows mainly in regions like Europe, Northern Africa and Eastern Australia. Also known as centaurium erythraea, this plant can easily be recognized by its triangular pale green leaves, pink flowers and yellowish anthers bloom. The fruit has the shape of a small oval capsule and it can only be harvested in the fall. Centaury Tea Properties Centaury has a bitter taste, which makes it a great ingredient for vermouth. Centaury Tea, however, is used by the alternative medicine for its great curative properties. The active constituents of Centaury Tea are: secoiridoids, alkaloids, phenolic acids, triterpenes, xanthone derivatives and triterpenes, which can only be released in the presence of hot water or other heating sources. Xanthone derivatives are also used by the alcohol producers in order to obtain a variety of liquors (especially the bitter ones). Centaury Tea Benefits Aside from its use as a vermouth ingredient, Centaury Tea has other health benefits, being prescribed by practitioners around the world since ancient times. Centaury Tea may be helpful in case you’re suffering from one of the following conditions: - Blood poisoning, by eliminating the toxins and increasing the blood flow. - A number of digestive ailments, such as constipation and gastritis. - Anemia, by nourishing the nervous system and increasing the coronary system function. - Diabetes and liver failure, by reconstructing the liver cells and lowering your blood sugar. - Kidney failure, by treating nephritis and other ailments of the urinary system. - Centaury Tea may also be used to induce appetite when taken before meals. How to make Centaury Tea Infusion Preparing Centaury Tea infusion is very easy. Use a teaspoon of freshly-picked or dried Centaury herbs for every cup of tea you want to make, add boiling water and wait 10 minutes for the health benefits to be released. Strain the decoction and drink it hot or cold. However, don’t drink more than 2 or 3 cups per day in order to avoid other health complications. Centaury Tea Side Effects When taken properly, Centaury Tea has no effects for adults. However, high dosages may lad to a number of ailments, such as nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. If you’ve been taking Centaury Tea for a while and you’re experiencing some unusual reactions, talk to your doctor as soon as possible! Centaury Tea Contraindications Don’t take Centaury Tea if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. Also, children and patients suffering from severe diseases that require blood thinners and anti-coagulants ingestion should avoid taking Centaury Tea at all costs! The same advice if you’re preparing for a major surgery (Centaury Tea may interfere with the anesthetic). In order to gather more information, talk to an herbalist or to your doctor. Once he gives you the green light, add Centaury Tea to your shopping cart and enjoy the wonderful benefits of this tea responsibly!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Chamomile tea is made from the well known chamomile flowers. The best quality chamomile flowers come from the Nile River Valley, Egypt and were considered by ancient Egyptians a remedy for all diseases. There basically are two main types of chamomile: Anthemis nobilis (Roman chamomile) and Matricaria Chamomilia (German chamomile).  German chamomile is known for many years for its positive results in treating anxiety, sleeping disorders, gingivitis and skin aliments, being most commonly used in teas. How to make Chamomile Tea To brew Chamomile tea, you will need:
  • Water
  • Chamomile flowers
  • Honey (Optional)
  • Mint (Optional)
The first step is boiling the water into a kettle.  Meanwhile, rinse and clean the chamomile flowers in cold running water. When the water reaches the boiling point, put in 2-3 teaspoons of chamomile flowers and let it boil for about 3-5 minutes.  When the time is up, pour the Chamomile tea into your cup while using a strainer to catch the chamomile flowers. To really enhance the flavor, you can add honey and crushed mint leaves. Benefits of Chamomile Tea
  • Chamomile tea is most known for its relaxing properties and it is often taken before bed by people with sleeping problems for a restful sleep. Use it with discretion if you are already taking medications that have a sedative effect!
  • Chamomile tea soothes stomach aches and helps overall digestion.
  • Some studies have found that Chamomile tea has a compound that calms muscle spasm, researchers believing that due to this fact, the tea helps soothe menstrual cramps.
  • Due to its antibacterial properties, Chamomile tea has resulted efficient in fighting colds, straightening the immune system.
  • Chamomile tea has also resulted beneficial in healing wounds and other skin problems such as burns, allergies, bites or acne. In case of treating a wound, put a cold compress of Chamomile tea on it and let it action for a few minutes.
Chamomile Tea side effects Although Chamomile tea is considered a safe tea, high concentrations may lead to nausea.  Also, if you are experiencing or have experienced allergic reactions to other plants in the same family as chamomile such as daisy, ragweed, aster, chrysanthemum or marigold, do not drink Chamomile tea since it might cause allergic reactions. Pregnant women should avoid drinking Chamomile tea, since it may act as a uterine stimulant and can increase the chance of abortion. If you have bleeding disorders, you should avoid Chamomile tea because it contains coumarin that can increase the chance of bleeding. All in all, if you had a stressful day, Chamomile tea is exactly what you need if you just want to relax. Just be sure you won’t drink too much, because over consumption can lead to any of those side effects that we all want to stay away from!... Beneficial Teas

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Moderate to high Protein: Moderate to high Fat: Low to high Saturated fat: High Cholesterol: Low to high Carbohydrates: Low Fiber: None Sodium: High Major vitamin contribution: Vitamin A, vitamin D, B vitamins Major mineral contribution: Calcium About the Nutrients in This Food Cheese making begins when Lactobacilli and/or Streptococci bacteria are added to milk. The bacteria digest lactose (milk sugar) and release lactic acid, which coagulates casein (milk protein) into curds. Rennet (gastric enzymes extracted from the stomach of calves) is added, and the mixture is put aside to set. The longer the curds are left to set, the firmer the cheese will be. When the curds are properly firm, they are pressed to squeeze out the whey (liquid) and cooked. Cooking evaporates even more liquid and makes the cheese even firmer.* At this point, the product is “fresh” or “green” cheese: cottage cheese, cream cheese, farmer cheese. Making “ripe” cheese requires the addition of salt to pull out more moisture and specific organisms, such as Penicil- lium roquefort for Roquefort cheese, blue cheese, and Stilton, or Penicillium cambembert for Camembert and Brie. The nutritional value of cheese is similar to the milk from which it is made. All cheese is a good source of high quality proteins with sufficient amounts of all the essential amino acids. Cheese is low to high in fat, mod- erate to high in cholesterol. * Natural cheese is cheese made direct ly from milk. Processed cheese is natural cheese melted and combined wit h emulsifiers. Pasteurized process cheese foods contain ingredients t hat allow t hem to spread smoot hly; t hey are lower in fat and higher in moisture t han processed cheese. Cholesterol and Saturated Fat Content of Selected Cheeses Mozzarella Source: USDA, Nutritive Value of Foods, Home and Garden Bullet in No. 72 (USDA, 1989). All cheeses, except cottage cheese, are good sources of vitamin A. Orange and yellow cheeses are colored with carotenoid pigments, including bixin (the carotenoid pigment in annatto) and synthetic beta-carotene. Hard cheeses are an excellent source of calcium; softer cheeses are a good source; cream cheese and cottage cheese are poor sources. The R DA for calcium is 1,000 mg for a woman, 1,200 mg for a man, and 1,500 mg for an older woman who is not on hormone- replacement therapy. All cheese, unless otherwise labeled, is high in sodium.
Calcium Content of Cheese  
  Cheese   Serving   Calcium (mg)
Blue oz. 150
Camembert wedge 147
Cheddar oz. 204
Cottage cheese    
creamed cup 135
uncreamed cup 46
Muenster oz. 203
Pasteurized processed American oz. 174
Parmesan grated tbsp. 69
Provolone oz. 214
Swiss oz. 272
  Source: Nutritive Value of Foods, Home and Gardens Bullet in No. 72 (USDA, 1989). The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food With grains, bread, noodles, beans, nuts, or vegetables to add the essential amino acids miss- ing from these foods, “complete” their proteins, and make them more nutritionally valuable. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Antiflatulence diet Controlled-fat, low-cholesterol diet Lactose- and galactose-free diet (lactose, a disaccharide [double sugar] is composed of one unit of galactose and one unit of glucose) Low-calcium diet (for patients with kidney disease) Sucrose-free diet (processed cheese) Buying This Food Look for: Cheese stored in a refrigerated case. Check the date on the package. Avoid: Any cheese with mold that is not an integral part of the food. Storing This Food Refrigerate all cheese except unopened canned cheeses (such as Camembert in tins) or grated cheeses treated with preservatives and labeled to show that they can be kept outside the refrigerator. Some sealed packages of processed cheeses can be stored at room temperature but must be refrigerated once the package is opened. Wrap cheeses tightly to protect them from contamination by other microorganisms in the air and to keep them from drying out. Well-wrapped, refrigerated hard cheeses that have not been cut or sliced will keep for up to six months; sliced hard cheeses will keep for about two weeks. Soft cheeses (cottage cheese, ricotta, cream cheese, and Neufchatel) should be used within five to seven days. Use all packaged or processed cheeses by the date stamped on the package. Throw out moldy cheese (unless the mold is an integral part of the cheese, as with blue cheese or Stilton). Preparing This Food To grate cheese, chill the cheese so it won’t stick to the grater. The molecules that give cheese its taste and aroma are largely immobilized when the cheese is cold. When serving cheese with fruit or crackers, bring it to room temperature to activate these molecules. What Happens When You Cook This Food Heat changes the structure of proteins. The molecules are denatured, which means that they may be broken into smaller fragments or change shape or clump together. All of these changes may force moisture out of the protein tissue, which is why overcooked cheese is often stringy. Whey proteins, which do not clump or string at low temperatures, contain the sulfur atoms that give hot or burned cheese an unpleasant “cooked” odor. To avoid both strings and an unpleasant odor, add cheese to sauces at the last minute and cook just long enough to melt the cheese. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Freezing. All cheese loses moisture when frozen, so semisoft cheeses will freeze and thaw better than hard cheeses, which may be crumbly when defrosted. Drying. The less moisture cheese contains, the less able it is to support the growth of organ- isms like mold. Dried cheeses keep significantly longer than ordinary cheeses. Medical Uses and/or Benefits To strengthen bones and reduce age-related loss of bone density. High-calcium foods protect bone density. The current recommended dietary allowance (R DA) for calcium is still 800 mg for adults 25 and older, but a 1984 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Conference advisory stated that lifelong protection for bones requires an R DA of 1,000 mg for healthy men and women age 25 to 50 ; 1,000 mg for older women using hormone replacement therapy; and 1,500 mg for older women who are not using hormones, and these recommendations have been confirmed in a 1994 NIH Consensus Statement on optimal calcium intake. A diet with adequate amounts of calcium-rich foods helps protect bone density. Low-fat and no-fat cheeses provide calcium without excess fat and cholesterol. Protection against tooth decay. Studies at the University of Iowa (Iowa City) Dental School confirm that a wide variety of cheeses, including aged cheddar, Edam, Gouda, Monterey Jack, Muenster, mozzarella, Port Salut, Roquefort, Romano, Stilton, Swiss, and Tilsit—limit the tooth decay ordinarily expected when sugar becomes trapped in plaque, the sticky film on tooth surfaces where cavity-causing bacteria flourish. In a related experiment using only cheddar cheese, people who ate cheddar four times a day over a two-week period showed a 20 percent buildup of strengthening minerals on the surface of synthetic toothlike material attached to the root surfaces of natural teeth. Protection against periodontal disease. A report in the January 2008 issue of the Journal of Periodontology suggests that consuming adequate amounts of dairy products may reduce the risk of developing periodontal disease. Examining the dental health of 942 subjects ages 40 to 79, researchers at Kyushu University, in Japan, discovered that those whose diets regularly included two ounces (55 g) of foods containing lactic acid (milk, cheese, and yogurt) were significantly less likely to have deep “pockets” (loss of attachment of tooth to gum) than those who consumed fewer dairy products. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Increased risk of heart disease. Like other foods from animals, cheese is a source of choles- terol and saturated fats, which increase the amount of cholesterol circulating in your blood and raise your risk of heart disease. To reduce the risk of heart disease, the USDA /Health and Human Services Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends limiting the amount of cholesterol in your diet to no more than 300 mg a day. The guidelines also recommend limit- ing the amount of fat you consume to no more than 30 percent of your total calories, while holding your consumption of saturated fats to more than 10 percent of your total calories (the calories from saturated fats are counted as part of the total calories from fat). Food poisoning. Cheese made from raw (unpasteurized) milk may contain hazardous microorganisms, including Salmonella and Listeria. Salmonella causes serious gastric upset; Lis- teria, a flulike infection, encephalitis, or blood infection. Both may be life-threatening to the very young, the very old, pregnant women, and those whose immune systems are weakened either by illness (such as AIDS) or drugs (such as cancer chemotherapy). In 1998, the Federal Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released data identif ying Listeria as the cause of nearly half the reported deaths from food poisoning. Allergy to milk proteins. Milk is one of the foods most frequently implicated as a cause of allergic reactions, particularly upset stomach. However, in many cases the reaction is not a true allergy but the result of lactose intolerance (see below). Lactose intolerance. Lactose intolerance—the inability to digest the sugar in milk—is an inherited metabolic deficiency that affects two thirds of all adults, including 90 to 95 percent of all Orientals, 70 to 75 percent of all blacks, and 6 to 8 percent of Caucasians. These people do not have sufficient amounts of lactase, the enzyme that breaks the disaccharide lactose into its easily digested components, galactose and glucose. When they drink milk, the undi- gested sugar is fermented by bacteria in the gut, causing bloating, diarrhea, flatulence, and intestinal discomfort. Some milk is now sold with added lactase to digest the lactose and make the milk usable for lactase-deficient people. In making cheese, most of the lactose in milk is broken down into glucose and galactose. There is very little lactose in cheeses other than the fresh ones—cottage cheese, cream cheese, and farmer cheese. Galactosemia. Galactosemia is an inherited metabolic disorder in which the body lacks the enzymes needed to metabolize galactose, a component of lactose. Galactosemia is a reces- sive trait; you must receive the gene from both parents to develop the condition. Babies born with galactosemia will fail to thrive and may develop brain damage or cataracts if they are given milk. To prevent this, children with galactosemia are usually kept on a protective milk- free diet for several years, until their bodies have developed alternative pathways by which to metabolize galactose. Pregnant women who are known carriers of galactosemia may be advised to give up milk and milk products while pregnant lest the unmetabolized galactose in their bodies cause brain damage to the fetus (damage not detectable by amniocentesis). Genetic counseling is available to identif y galactosemia carriers and assess their chances of producing a baby with the disorder. Penicillin sensitivity. People who experience a sensitivity reaction the first time they take penicillin may have been sensitized by exposure to the Penicillium molds in the environment, including the Penicillium molds used to make brie, blue, camembert, roquefort, Stilton, and other “blue” cheeses. Food/Drug Interactions Tetracycline. The calcium ions in milk products, including cheese, bind tetracyclines into insoluble compounds. If you take tetracyclines with cheese, your body may not be able to absorb and use the drug efficiently. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are drugs used to treat depression. They inactivate naturally occurring enzymes in your body that metabolize tyra- mine, a substance found in many fermented or aged foods. Tyramine constricts blood ves- sels and increases blood pressure. If you eat a food such as aged or fermented cheese which is high in tyramine while you are taking an M AO inhibitor, your body may not be able to eliminate the tyramine. The result may be a hypertensive crisis. Tyramine Content of Cheeses High Boursault, Camembert, Cheddar, Emmenthaler, Stilton Medium to high Blue, brick, Brie, Gruyère, mozzarella, Parmesan, Romano, Roquefort Low Processed American cheese Very little or none Cottage and cream cheese Sources: The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions (1985); Handbook of Clinical Dietetics ( The A merican Dietet ic Associat ion, 1981). False-positive test for pheochromocytoma. Pheochromocytomas (tumors of the adrenal glands) secrete adrenalin that is converted by the body to vanillyl-mandelic acid ( VM A) and excreted in the urine. Tests for this tumor measure the level of VM A in the urine. Since cheese contains VM A, taking the test after eating cheese may result in a false-positive result. Ordinarily, cheese is prohibited for at least 72 hours before this diagnostic test.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Beneficial Teas

Chickweed is actually the basis for a refreshing and useful tea, which can be easily found in stores and has various benefits for the whole body. So don’t pass it by. Everything about Chickweed Tea With the botanical name of Stellaria media, Chickweed is also commonly known as star weed, star chickweed or satin flower. The chickweed weed has straight green stems, small star-like white flowers and blooms from March till October. It is commonly found all over the world. Chickweed is rich in calcium, potassium, magnesium, vitamin C and contains a number of other nutrients like mucilage, saponins, silica, vitamin A and B, fatty acids or other minerals as well. Chickweed tea is a great source of nutrition with many health benefits. How to brew Chickweed Tea For a tasty tea, you can combine either 1 teaspoon of dried plant or 2 tablespoons of fresh, finely chopped chickweed into 1 cup of boiling water. Don’t forget to wash and dry preferable freshly picked chickweed leaves. Allow the plant to steep into the boiling water for approximately 10 minutes then your tea is ready to be served. Chickweed Tea benefits Chickweed Tea has multiple medical benefits both internally and externally. Chickweed Tea is a diuretic, a mild laxative; it increases the body’s metabolism and reduces appetite. That makes it ideal for a weight loss diet. It calms the respiratory system ailments like asthma, bronchitis, cough or others associated to this. Chickweed tea has anti-inflammatory properties so it can reduce any inflammation and help to relieve pain, both internally and externally. It is also a blood purifier. Chickweed tea can also be used externally as wash, poultice, or salve with good results in alleviating any wounds, allergies or skin problems due to its detoxifying properties. Chickweed Tea Side effects Although chickweed tea is generally considered safe for adults’ consumption, side effects may occasionally include upset stomach, nausea or vomiting. Pregnant or nursing women should not drink chickweed tea, as there are not enough studies to show whether it is safe for pregnancy or for children. People with allergies to the daisy plant family should avoid chickweed tea. Chickweed contains nitrate so if you drink too much tea, you may experience symptoms of nitrate poisoning like weakness, headache, fainting, bluish fingers and lips and dizziness. So be sure to keep your moderation. Although it is recommended to include it in your lifestyle, you should not drink more than 2 or 3 cups of chickweed tea per day as it will lose its benefits.... Beneficial Teas

Medicinal Plants Glossary

Bacterial infection caused by Vibrio cholerae. The patient su?ers profuse watery DIARRHOEA, and resultant dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Formerly known as the Asiatic cholera, the disease has occurred in epidemics and pandemics for many centuries. When it entered Europe in 1853, Dr John Snow, a London anaesthetist, carried out seminal epidemiological work in Soho, London, which established that the source of infection was contaminated drinking water derived from the Broad Street pump. Several smaller epidemics involved Europe in the latter years of the 19th century, but none has arisen in Britain or the United States for many years. In 1971, the El Tor biotype of V. cholerae emerged, replacing much of the classical infection in Asia and, to a much lesser extent, Europe; parts of Africa were seriously a?ected. Recently a non-01 strain has arisen and is causing much disease in Asia. Cholera remains a major health problem (this is technically the seventh pandemic) in many countries of Asia, Africa and South America. It is one of three quarantinable infections.

Incubation period varies from a few hours to ?ve days. Watery diarrhoea may be torrential and the resultant dehydration and electrolyte imbalance, complicated by cardiac failure, commonly causes death. The victim’s skin elasticity is lost, the eyes are sunken, and the radial pulse may be barely perceptible. Urine production may be completely suppressed. Diagnosis is by detection of V. cholerae in a faecal sample. Treatment consists of rapid rehydration. Whereas the intravenous route may be required in a severe case, in the vast majority of patients oral rehydration (using an appropriate solution containing sodium chloride, glucose, sodium bicarbonate, and potassium) gives satisfactory results. Proprietary rehydration ?uids do not always contain adequate sodium for rehydration in a severe case. ANTIBIOTICS, for example, tetracycline and doxycycline, reduce the period during which V. cholerae is excreted (in children and pregnant women, furazolidone is safer); in an epidemic, rapid resistance to these, and other antibiotics, has been clearly demonstrated. Prevention consists of improving public health infrastructure – in particular, the quality of drinking water. When supplies of the latter are satisfactory, the infection fails to thrive. Though there have recently been large epidemics of cholera in much of South America and parts of central Africa and the Indian subcontinent, the risk of tourists and travellers contracting the disease is low if they take simple precautions. These include eating safe food (avoid raw or undercooked seafood, and wash vegetables in clean water) and drinking clean water. There is no cholera vaccine at present available in the UK as it provides little protection and cannot control spread of the disease. Those travelling to countries where it exists should pay scrupulous attention to food and water cleanliness and to personal hygiene.... Medicinal Plants Glossary

Beneficial Teas

Chun Hao tea is a jasmine fragrancedtype of green tea. It proved to be a good afternoon treat or can simply be a dinner follow-up. Chun Hao tea description Chun Hao tea is the finest type of Chinese green tea mixed with jasmine, once being reserved only for the Imperial Court. One of the most known characteristics of the tea regards its distinctive sweet and delicate taste. Scented only with fresh jasmine blossoms, carefully hand-sorted, and harvest by day time, Chun Hao tea is an incredible treat. Brewing Chun Hao tea Chinese people have always had a tea culture, enjoying scented teas and being fond of Chun Hao tea. This type of tea distinguishes itself among the other green tea varieties through its light and delicate sweetness, but also through its fresh fragrance due to its jasmine content. To prepare Chun Hao tea, use 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls dry leaf per cup and brew them between 2 to 3 minutes at 175°F (80°C). Consumers do not throw away the brewed leaves, because they stand up to multiple infusions, keeping though their therapeutical qualities. Chun Hao tea benefits Chun Hao tea, like any type of green tea, lowers the risk of cancer. The antioxidants have proven their efficiency in fighting the free radicals responsible for the growth of tumors. Chun Hao tea has been intensively used in:
  • reducing cholesterol
  • stabilizing blood glucose levels
  • reducing weight
  • decreasing excess deposits of fat
  • aiding digestion processes
  • promoting skin health
  • promoting good oral hygiene
  • aiding in the relief of anxiety due to emotional and physical stress
Chun Hao tea side effects Chun Hao teahas low caffeine content, but studies conducted so far claim that pregnant women, children and patients suffering from heart diseases should not intake it in large quantities. Agitation and anxiety were rarely noticed. Chun Hao tea is another pleasant green tea combined with jasmine leaves, which aim to render a state of well-being and relaxation to the consumer.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Cleavers tea has been used for centuries, even in ancient Greece. It is considered probably the best tonic for the lymphatic system available. Discover all of its benefits and learn how to make the most of this type of tea. Description of Cleavers tea Cleavers is an annual green plant that grows mostly in Britain, North America and Eurasia regions. The green to white flowers look like small balls and they are very sticky, similar to the leaves. Scientifically named gallium aparine, cleavers is also called bedstraw, barweed, catchweed, grip grass. The entire cleavers plant is used in herbal medicine and is harvested just before it blooms in early summer. The active constituents of cleavers tea are chlorophyll, citric acide, rubichloric acid, galiosin and tannins. To benefit the most from these constituents, you can consume cleavers, usually found in the form of tea, extracts, capsule, or fresh for many cooking recipes. The roasted seeds are used as a coffee substitute and the young leaves can be eaten like spinach. Cleavers tea has a slightly bitter taste and no odor. Cleavers tea brew For a tasty Cleavers tea, take 2 to 3 teaspoons of the dried above-ground parts of the plant and infuse them in a 250 mg cup of hot water for 10 or 15 minutes. You may add sugar or honey to improve its taste and drink up to three times per day. Cleavers tea  Benefits Cleavers tea is a strong detoxifying for the lymphatic system. It is diuretic, thus treating most of urinary tract infections. It cleans the blood, the liver and kidneys. The tea can be used together with Uva Ursi or Echinacea for best results. Applied topically, Cleavers tea helps in the treatment of many skin conditions like acne, eczema, psoriasis, dandruff, itchy scalp, sunburns or even wounds. Cleavers tea can be used as a facial tonner because it helps clear the complexion. Cleavers tea Side effects Cleavers tea has no known side effects. Though it is widely safe, children, pregnant or nursing women should drink it with precaution. Cleavers tea can surely be included in a healthy lifestyle. As long as you don’t exaggerate with it, you can enjoy the benefits of this tea and even use the plant to prepare many tasty recipes and salads.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

The benefits of Club Moss tea are known for centuries. It was used by the ancient Druids and Chinese people as a homeopath remedy for various conditions. About Club Moss tea Botanically called Lycopodium clavatum, Club Moss is also found under the name of Wolf’s Claw. It is an evergreen plant that looks similar to a pine tree with small needles creeping along the forest floor and can be found in almost every continent in the world. It contains radium, alkaloids, polyphenolic acids, flavonoids and minerals. Some studies conducted in China have showed that “huperzine”, one of Club Moss tea’s constituents may improve the cognitive function raising its popularity as a memory enhancement supplement. It may also have a significant impact on amnesia and the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Brew Club Moss tea Club Moss tea is prepared from one teaspoon of small cut pieces added to half a liter of boiled water. It is left like that for about 5 minutes. Never boil the plant, just pour the water over it. It is recommended to consume a cup per day, slowly, in the morning, on an empty stomach, half an hour before breakfast. Club Moss tea Benefits Club Moss tea has many health benefits. Find below a short list. Club Moss tea is a tonic for the liver, kidneys, bladder, urinary tract, and reproductive organs. According to the traditional Chinese medicine, Club Moss tea has been used for centuries to treat fever and inflammation. It has diuretic, anti-alcoholic, anti-tobacco, anti-cirrhotic, and purgative properties. If you also have a stomach that is easily irritated or chronic diarrhea, Club Moss tea can also help you feel relief. Club Moss Tea is said to help cleanse the kidney and may alleviate urinary tract infections like cystitis. When applied topically, this tea may help in the healing of wounds or other skin conditions and it can help stop the bleeding. Club Moss tea Side Effects Club Moss tea is mostly safe in the right amounts; do not drink more than 2 cups a day as it is not recommended for a long term-use. Overuse may cause griping or grumbling pains in the intestinal tract. Pregnant women should avoid drinking it. Also, people who suffer from diarrhea should use the tea only with the greatest caution as cramps in the intestines could develop. Club Moss tea is mostly safe and you can drink it without any problem as long as you keep in mind its precautions and you do not take more than 2 cups a day for a long period of time. So use it only when you need it.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Coltsfoot tea is a popular remedy for cough as well as for other respiratory problems. Read more about it. More about Coltsfoot Tea Also known as tussilago farfara, coltsfoot is native to Europe, but can also be found in North America. It is a perennial, woolly herbaceous plant, with green heart-shaped leaves, that blossoms in early spring with a bright yellow flower, resembling a dandelion. Coltsfoot can be bought as tea infusion, capsules, syrups or extracts. The active constituents of coltsfoot tea are mucilage, flavonoids, tannins, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, zinc and vitamin C. These constituents are known to impart the expectorant, antitussive, demulcent, anti-spasmodic, anti-inflammatory, diuretic and anti-catarrhal properties of the herb. While the pyrrolizidine alkaloids are believed to be toxic for the liver, they are obliterated when boiled to prepare a decoction. How to brew Coltsfoot Tea Flowers and leaves are usually used to prepare a tasty cup of coltsfoot tea. Making the tea is easy. Just use one teaspoon of dried plant and let it steep for 30 minutes in a cup of hot water. Health Benefits of Coltsfoot Tea Coltsfoot Tea is said to be effective in treating and relieving lung, chest and bronchial ailments such as: whooping cough, dry cough, asthma, catarrh, bronchitis, emphysema. This tea may improve the immune system. It may help alleviate the inflammations. When applied externally, especially the crushed flowers, it is said to cure certain skin conditions. Side Effects of Coltsfoot Tea The main side effect of coltsfoot tea is the fact that the pyrrolizidine alkaloids contained may contribute to liver toxicity and even cancer. It is still a subject of debate as some countries even prohibited its usage. There is a concern that coltsfoot tea taken in large amounts might interfere with treatment for patients with high blood pressure, heart and liver diseases. Pregnant and breastfeeding women, infants and children are advised not to use coltsfoot tea as a safe precaution. The long-term use of this herb is also not advised. Occasionally, it can also generate allergies.   Although it contains harmful pyrrolizidine alkaloids, the herb is considered to be safe when taken in small doses. However, the risks are generally seen by many as small and the health benefits outweigh these risks. As long as you keep the moderation and pay attention to the precautions, you may enjoy a cup of coltsfoot tea in your diet.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A means of avoiding pregnancy despite sexual activity. There is no ideal contraceptive, and the choice of method depends on balancing considerations of safety, e?ectiveness and acceptability. The best choice for any couple will depend on their ages and personal circumstances and may well vary with time. Contraceptive techniques can be classi?ed in various ways, but one of the most useful is into ‘barrier’ and ‘non-barrier’ methods.

Barrier methods These involve a physical barrier which prevents sperm (see SPERMATOZOON) from reaching the cervix (see CERVIX UTERI). Barrier methods reduce the risk of spreading sexually transmitted diseases, and the sheath is the best protection against HIV infection (see AIDS/HIV) for sexually active people. The e?ciency of barrier methods is improved if they are used in conjunction with a spermicidal foam or jelly, but care is needed to ensure that the preparation chosen does not damage the rubber barrier or cause an allergic reaction in the users. CONDOM OR SHEATH This is the most commonly used barrier contraceptive. It consists of a rubber sheath which is placed over the erect penis before intromission and removed after ejaculation. The failure rate, if properly used, is about 4 per cent. DIAPHRAGM OR CAP A rubber dome that is inserted into the vagina before intercourse and ?ts snugly over the cervix. It should be used with an appropriate spermicide and is removed six hours after intercourse. A woman must be measured to ensure that she is supplied with the correct size of diaphragm, and the ?t should be checked annually or after more than about 7 lbs. change in weight. The failure rate, if properly used, is about 2 per cent.

Non-barrier methods These do not provide a physical barrier between sperm and cervix and so do not protect against sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. COITUS INTERRUPTUS This involves the man’s withdrawing his penis from the vagina before ejaculation. Because some sperm may leak before full ejaculation, the method is not very reliable. SAFE PERIOD This involves avoiding intercourse around the time when the woman ovulates and is at risk of pregnancy. The safe times can be predicted using temperature charts to identify the rise in temperature before ovulation, or by careful assessment of the quality of the cervical mucus. This method works best if the woman has regular menstrual cycles. If used carefully it can be very e?ective but requires a highly disciplined couple to succeed. It is approved by the Catholic church.

SPERMICIDAL GELS, CREAMS, PESSARIES, ETC.

These are supposed to prevent pregnancy by killing sperm before they reach the cervix, but they are unreliable and should be used only in conjunction with a barrier method.

INTRAUTERINE CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICE (COIL) This is a small metal or plastic shape, placed inside the uterus, which prevents pregnancy by disrupting implantation. Some people regard it as a form of abortion, so it is not acceptable to all religious groups. There is a risk of pelvic infection and eventual infertility in women who have used coils, and in many countries their use has declined substantially. Coils must be inserted by a specially trained health worker, but once in place they permit intercourse at any time with no prior planning. Increased pain and bleeding may be caused during menstruation. If severe, such symptoms may indicate that the coil is incorrectly sited, and that its position should be checked. HORMONAL METHODS Steroid hormones have dominated contraceptive developments during the past 40 years, with more than 200 million women worldwide taking or having taken ‘the pill’. In the past 20 years, new developments have included modifying existing methods and devising more e?ective ways of delivering the drugs, such as implants and hormone-releasing devices in the uterus. Established hormonal contraception includes the combined oestrogen and progesterone and progesterone-only contraceptive pills, as well as longer-acting depot preparations. They modify the woman’s hormonal environment and prevent pregnancy by disrupting various stages of the menstrual cycle, especially ovulation. The combined oestrogen and progesterone pills are very e?ective and are the most popular form of contraception. Biphasic and triphasic pills contain di?erent quantities of oestrogen and progesterone taken in two or three phases of the menstrual cycle. A wide range of preparations is available and the British National Formulary contains details of the commonly used varieties.

The main side-e?ect is an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The lowest possible dose of oestrogen should be used, and many preparations are phasic, with the dose of oestrogen varying with the time of the cycle. The progesterone-only, or ‘mini’, pill does not contain any oestrogen and must be taken at the same time every day. It is not as e?ective as the combined pill, but failure rates of less than 1-per-100 woman years can be achieved. It has few serious side-e?ects, but may cause menstrual irregularities. It is suitable for use by mothers who are breast feeding.

Depot preparations include intramuscular injections, subcutaneous implants, and intravaginal rings. They are useful in cases where the woman cannot be relied on to take a pill regularly but needs e?ective contraception. Their main side-e?ect is their prolonged action, which means that users cannot suddenly decide that they would like to become pregnant. Skin patches containing a contraceptive that is absorbed through the skin have recently been launched.

HORMONAL CONTRACEPTION FOR MEN There is a growing demand by men worldwide for hormonal contraception. Development of a ‘male pill’, however, has been slow because of the potentially dangerous side-e?ects of using high doses of TESTOSTERONE (the male hormone) to suppress spermatogenesis. Progress in research to develop a suitable ANDROGEN-based combination product is promising, including the possibility of long-term STEROID implants. STERILISATION See also STERILISATION – Reproductive sterilisation. The operation is easier and safer to perform on men than on women. Although sterilisation can sometimes be reversed, this cannot be guaranteed and couples should be counselled in advance that the method is irreversible. There is a small but definite failure rate with sterilisation, and this should also be made clear before the operation is performed. POSTCOITAL CONTRACEPTION Also known as emergency contraception or the ‘morning after pill’, postcoital contraception can be e?ected by two di?erent hormonal methods. Levonorgesterol (a synthetic hormone similar to the natural female sex hormone PROGESTERONE) can be used alone, with one pill being taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse, but preferably as soon as possible, and a second one 12 hours after the ?rst. Alternatively, a combined preparation comprising ETHINYLESTRADIOL and levonorgesterol can be taken, also within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse. The single constituent pill has fewer side-e?ects than the combined version. Neither version should be taken by women with severe liver disease or acute PORPHYRIAS, but the ethinylestradiol/levonorgesterol combination is unsuitable for women with a history of THROMBOSIS.

In the UK the law allows women over the age of 16 to buy the morning-after pill ‘over the counter’ from a registered pharmacist.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Corydalis tea was used for centuries in ancient Chinese medicine as a pain reliever. But this tea has also various other health benefits. More on Corydalis tea Native to the northern parts of China, Japan, Eastern Russia and Eastern Africa, Corydalis is a perennial plant that usually grows in shade along the edges of woodlands. It possesses pink flowers and finely-divided thin leaves and yellow tubers. It is closely related to the opium poppy family. Its medicinal properties largely lie in the roots or rhizomes. Corydalis is used either as a decoction, tincture, extract or tea for its analgesic, antispasmodic, antiseptic, sedative, tranquilizing, anti-cancer, hypotensive and cardiotonic qualities. It contains more than 20 potent alkaloids that include tetrahydropalmatine, dehydrocorydaline, protopine and cordalines. Though its effects are somewhat similar to that given by the opium poppy, corydalis tea is said to be non-addictive. Its taste can be bitter so you might want to drink it along with some sweeteners. Corydalis herb is typically mixed with other herbs by Chinese herbal practitioners. They use it in a variety of ways, for example with peony and licorice to fight spastic pain, or with pteropus and bulrush for treating abdominal and menstrual pain. Corydalis tea brew Corydalis tea can be made by placing a handful of the dried roots in a pot of boiling water and allowing it to steep for about 15 to 20 minutes. Then let it simmer for a further 5 minutes before drinking it. Alternatively, an infusion can be made using the powdered form of the roots. Simply immerse the powdered corydalis roots in newly-boiled water for about 5 to 7 minutes. Corydalis tea benefits Here are some of the health benefits of Corydalis tea. It lowers blood pressure, eases heart rate and reinforces the circulation system. Being a pain reliever, Corydalis tea can ease chest and abdominal pains, fight pain in the lumbar region and  help relieve menstrual cramps and dysmenorrhea. It can cure anxiety, restlessness, sleeplessness and edginess. Corydalis tea may help fight stomach ulcers as it may help decrease gastric secretions. Corydalis tea may be helpful in fighting cough and allergies. Corydalis tea side effects Corydalis tea has some precautions that should be considered before taking it. Corydalis tea should always be used under the supervision of a health care provider. The tea is not for the use of children, pregnant or nursing women, liver or kidney disease. People taking sleeping pills, depressants and alcohol should avoid it, as the effects of such a combination have not yet been fully established. Corydalis tea can be included in a healthy life style, but first consult with your physician and do not drink too much of it.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Cramp Bark is one of the wonder herbs, best suited for women’s needs. The Cramp Bark tea is one of the most effective methods for preventing and easing menstrual problems, as well as other female related issues. It has long been recognized for its antispasmodic, astringent and sedative properties. About Cramp Bark Tea Native to Europe and Africa, Cramp Bark has been introduced to North America and it grows in a wide range of zones. The plant takes its name from the ability to ease cramping. Also called Viburnum opulus or guilder rose, it is a very pretty shrub, blooming with white flowers. The ripe red berries are rich in vitamin C, but are poisonous if uncooked. The fruit is edible in small quantities and has a very acidic taste; it can be used to make jelly. It is however very mildly toxic, and may cause vomiting or diarrhea if eaten in large amounts. Barks represent the raw material for making herbal products. The flowers can be used as well in a decoction for external use. Cramp Bark tea is a uterine sedative, aiding in menstrual cramps, afterbirth and postpartum pains. It helps to prevent a miscarriage, as well as internal hemorrhagin. The following are some of the active constituents of cramp bark tea: hydroquinones, coumarins, tannins, scopoletin, and resins. Brew Cramp Bark Tea Cramp bark tea is a muscle and nerve relaxant. If you want to prevent cramps, drink 2 cups of cramp bark tea daily, starting a week before your period will begin. Prepare the tea by steeping a teaspoon of the herb or a teabag in a cup of boiled water for about 7 minutes. Strain, add a sweetener and enjoy it. Benefits of Cramp Bark Tea Apart from aiding in the female problems, many herb experts consider cramp bark tea as the best remedy for muscle pains and body aches associated with movement. Cramp bark tea may help relieve pain from cramps, especially in the leg or neck. It may also help uterine cramps or period pains. It may help in facilitating an easy labor to women giving birth by building up the uterine muscles. Cramp bark tea may help relax tense muscles especially if applied topically as a skin ointment or lotion. Cramp bark tea may lower blood pressure. This tea may be used in the treatment of asthma. This kind of tea is very helpful in relieving constipation, colic or irritable bowel syndrome. Cramp bark tea may help fight arthritis. Cramp bark tea may offer relief from tension headaches. Side effects of Cramp Bark Tea Apparently, there aren’t any known side effects or drug interactions for cramp bark tea, nor are there any documented reports of toxic reactions to the herb. However, not many studies on this plant have been conducted and, consequently, some precautions must be taken, especially because the fruits are potentially toxic. In spite of its many benefits for women, do not take this tea if you suspect you are pregnant. Cramp bark tea is very healthy and if your physician approves it, you can safely drink up to three cups a day.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Dandelion tea is an excellent source of vitamins and an unbeatable way to maintain healthy body and mind. About Dandelion tea Dandelion is a perennial yellow plant scientifically called Taraxacum officinale. Itcan be used as a herbal plant but also in the kitchen in many recipes, salads etc. It grows everywhere and it appears in early spring. Its flowers last until late fall. For medical purposes, the young flowers are usually used before flowering along with the root. The flowers are an important source of vitamins (A, B, C and D), minerals (is very rich in potassium) proteins, carbohydrates, and tannins, caffeic acid. The leaves are also important. The root contains a bitter compound - taraxacina - but it is also rich in pectins, sterols, vitamins B1, C and D, inulin, tannin, volatile oils and reshines. You can use the leaves to prepare salads, juices, infusions or tinctures. The roots are mostly used for teas, tinctures and decoction. Dandelion tea is considered an overall tonic with multiple benefits. How to brew Dandelion tea For regular use, you can drink 2 cups of dandelion tea per day. Use 2 teaspoons of dried plant for a hot water cup. Let it infuse for a couple of minutes and then let it rinse. Another way of drinking the dandelion tea is by using small cutted leaves and dried roots. Pour into a container approximately 200 ml of water, add the plant and let it boil. After that, cover the container with something and keep it to infuse for 15 minutes. In the end, filter it and enjoy the tea. You may add some honey or sugar. Benefits of Dandelion tea Dandelion tea has lots of benefits as it is considered one of the healthiest teas. - Dandelion tea is depurative, sudorific and diuretic - Dandelion tea helps to diminish high cholesterol - It promotes gastrointestinal health, enhancing digestion, stimulating the appetite and treating digestive problems such as heartburn or upset stomach - Dandelion tea is suitable in diets or in fighting obesity as it helps the body eliminate water, having a detoxifying role -The tea is considered to be aliver, kidney and gallbladder tonic and it normalizes blood circulation - It is used with success in treating several skin ailments like acne, gout, atherosclerosis, varicose veins - Dandelion tea has an antirheumatic effect and some studies underlined that it also boosts the immunity - Dandelion tea also has a cosmetic  use as it improves skin clarity and cleanses complexion Side effects of Dandelion tea Although dandelion tea has many benefits, it also has several warnings that you should take into consideration. It is not advisable to use the plant after flowering. Dandelion tea can reduce the efficiency of some medicines and may interact with some drugs or other herbs. Avoid combining this tea with antibiotics, garlic, gingko biloba, blood thinners or pain relievers, as a risk of bleeding may arise. Some studies pointed out that those suffering of diabetes and low blood sugar, as well as pregnant women or breastfeeding women should consult their physician before drinking dandelion tea. If you are allergic to daisies, chrysanthemum, chamomile or marigold you may also develop same reaction for dandelion. Some people call dandelion tea the elixir of long life as it brings vitality and makes you strong if you consume it on a regular basis. However, it’s best to keep the moderation and to search for information before you decide to drink it on a regular basis.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Darjeeling tea is a black tea grown in the Darjeeling district in West Bengal, India. Darjeeling tea is also called the “champagne of teas” since it is considered to be the finest tea in the world. At first, Darjeeling tea was available only as black tea but later on, Darjeeling white tea and Darjeeling oolong tea have been produced. Darjeeling tea is made from the small-leaved Chinese plant Camellia Sinensis, unlike most Indian teas that are made from the large-leaved Assam plant. The reason is that, in the early 1840’s, a civil surgeon of the Indian Medical Service named Dr. Campbell was transferred to Darjeeling and used seeds from China to experiment tea planting. How to brew Darjeeling tea Many tea drinkers complain about not getting the right flavor when drinking the Indian Darjeeling tea. The main reason why this happens is because the preparation of Darjeeling tea is a delicate process and ignoring even only one step can cause the loss of an authentic flavor and taste. Here are some important rules in brewing Darjeeling tea:
  • Use water that is free of chlorine, iron, salt and other type of impurities, because otherwise it can completely ruin the taste orDarjeeling tea.
  • An important detail that most people ignore is using the right teapot. That is why it is recommended the use of China porcelain teapots and cups.
  • For proper infusion, the Darjeeling tea leaves should be placed into the pot and then pour hot water on it.
  • And last, Darjeeling tea connoisseurs advise not to put any kind of milk, honey or sugar in it since they change the aromatic flavor of Darjeeling tea. Also, milk reduces the benefits of this tea.
Here are the brewing instructions: First of all, you have to boil the water. Once the water is boiled, let it cool for about 5 minutes because if it is too hot, the Darjeeling tea leaves might burn and you will lose the flavor. Then add one teaspoon of Darjeeling leaves per 8 oz cup in the teapot and slowly pour water over the leaves.  Let it steep between 2-5 minutes, but be careful! Steeping it for more than 5 minutes, may lead to a bitter cup of tea!  Try to drink it without any kind of sweetener or milk to really enjoy the flavor. Darjeeling Tea benefits Darjeeling tea has many benefits because of the high antioxidant content that combat free radicals and diseases. Also Darjeeling tea contains vitamins and minerals such as Vitamin C, Vitamin K, calcium, magnesium and potassium, according the University of Arizona.
  • Darjeeling tea strengthens your immune system, lowers cholesterol, fights dental plaque and maintains a healthy heart.
  • Provides relaxation because of the L-theanine (amino - acid) that reduces mental and physical stress. That is why, people who suffer from depression or have anxiety attacks are advised to drink Darjeeling tea since it offers a feeling of well-being.
  • It gives you energy, even though it has a small amount of caffeine. The L-theanine amino- acid softens caffeine’s speedy and uneven effects so that a person who is consuming Darjeeling tea feels relaxed and energized in the same time.
  • Darjeeling tea contains antioxidants called flavonoids that protect cells from free radical damage.
  • Reduces stroke risks and improves the function of blood vessels.
Darjeeling tea side effects  Since Darjeeling tea is a black tea, it has almost the same side effects as the simple black tea:
  • People with anemia and iron deficiency should avoid drinking Darjeeling black tea.
  • In cases of diabetes, even though Darjeeling tea’s caffeine content is softened by the the L-theanine amino - acid, still might affect blood sugar.
  • People who present calcium deficit shouldn’t drink black tea, including Darjeeling tea, since it could produce dizziness and the sensation of fainting.
  • Also, pregnant women are advised not to drink black tea.
Darjeeling tea is perfect for any time of the day and it is worldwide acknowledged as being to teas what champagne is to wine. It has a unique flavor that cannot be replicated anywhere else in the world!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Heather tea has been used in Swedish herbal medicine for a very long time and has been recognized for its medicinal properties by the German Commission E. Heather (calluna vulgaris) is a woody and bushy plant with multiple branching stems, that grows mainly in Scotland, Ireland, the Scandinavian countries, Russia and North America. The parts of the heather plant have different usage. For example: the branches are used as straw for brooms and the leaves are used as flavoring agent for beer and teas. The constituents of heather plant are various types of quercetin, tannin and flavonoids. How To Make Heather Tea To make your own heather tea, you will need a handful of chopped heather, both flowers and leaves. Boil the water, add the heather and let the mix steep for about 10-15 minutes. After that, pour the tea into your cup using a strainer to catch the heather leaves and flowers. Depending on your preferences, you can sweeten it by adding sugar or honey. Heather Tea Benefits Heather tea has a lot of health benefits:
  • Helps in the treatment of kidney and bladder problems.
  • Prevents and treats rheumatism, arthritis and gout.
  • It is a remedy for cold and cough.
  • Helps disinfecting the urinary tract.
  • It is a strong allied in the treatment of cystitis.
  • Tears various gastrointestinal problems.
Heather Tea Side Effects The things that you should keep in mind when you consider drinking heather tea are:
  • You shouldn’t drink too much heather tea because it can cause liver damage.
  • Heather tea can alter the effects of some medications, especially the ones related to the urinary and gastro intestinal tract, so make sure you consult your doctor before drinking it.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking heather tea.
All in all, try not to drink more than 2 cups of heather tea. Enjoy all its benefits and make sure you won’t experience any of its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Marjoram tea has been known for a very long time for its diuretic and antispasmodic actions. Marjoram is a perennial herb that grows in North Africa, the Middle East and India. Its leaves are small, roundish and fuzzy-haired, having a sweet and spicy flavor in the same time. It is believed that marjoram plant was cultivated by Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love. The herb is still placed in hope chests and under women’s pillow to ensure a happy marriage. The constituents of marjoram tea are oleic acids, essential oils, tannins, ursolic acid, vitamin C and zinc. How To Make Marjoram Tea To brew marjoram tea, you will need to place 1 teaspoon of marjoram herb in 8 ounces of cold water. Bring the mix to a boil and just when the water reaches the boiling point, reduce the heat and let it steep for 15-20 minutes. Strain the tea into your cup and enjoy! Marjoram Tea Benefits
  • Helps relieve dry cough.
  • May help in the treatment of epilepsy and rheumatism.
  • Can be used as a remedy for asthma.
  • Relieves indigestion and flatulence.
  • Prevents spasm in the digestive tract.
Marjoram Tea Side Effects So far, no side effects have been noticed when consuming marjoram tea. However, pregnant women should not consume large amounts of marjoram because it can cause uterine contractions. Infants and children should not drink marjoram tea. If you are experiencing nausea, diarrhea or vomiting, reduce your dose of marjoram tea or stop drinking it! If these symptoms last more than a few days, consult your doctor. Marjoram tea may interfere with the action of certain drugs, so make sure you consult your doctor before drinking any herbal tea. Marjoram tea is a healthy choice, having many health benefits. Do not drink more than 3 cups per day in order not to experience any of the side effects listed above!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Horsetail tea is made from the horsetail herb also named Equisetum arvense. Horsetail was used by ancient Romans and Greeks in medicine as an herbal remedy to stop bleeding, heal wounds and treat tuberculosis or kidney problems. This plant is actually a non-flowering weed that is found in some parts of Europe, Asia, the Middle East and North America. How to brew Horsetail Tea To brew a cup of horsetail tea, place 1-2 teaspoons of dried horsetail in a cup of boiled water. Then cover it and let it steep for about 10-15 minutes. When the time is up, strain thehorsetail tea into another cup and, depending on your taste preferences, sweeten it with some honey or sugar. Horsetail Tea benefits Horsetail tea has a lot of health benefits due to its high silica content that may help straighten bones, hair and nails, relieve bloating and fight fungal infections.  Also, horsetail tea:
  • It is most commonly used as a diuretic since washes away the toxins, having a cleansing effect to the kidneys.
  • Strengthens your lungs thanks to its main component - silica acid helps strengthen the walls of the air sacs in the lungs.
  • Promotes healthy hair. You can add 4 oz. of cooled horsetail tea into your shampoo or you can use the tea as a hair rinse.
  • Reduces swellings and gets rid of water retention.
  • Treats urinary infections.
  • Helps healing and treating burns and wounds thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties.
Horsetail Tea side effects Even though this tea has a lot of benefits, over consumption may lead to certain side effects. Try not to drink more than 2 cups of horsetail tea a day.
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding women are advised not to drink horsetail tea.
  • If you have kidney stones, try to stay away from this tea.
  • You can experience nausea, muscle weakness, fever or certain skin problems if you drink too much horsetail tea.
  • Before you start drinking horsetail tea, make sure you don’t have theamine deficiency or weak heart. In case you do, do not drink this tea.
Horsetail tea makes an excellent choice of drink since it has a lot of medical properties and therefore many benefits. Avoid over consumption and enjoy a healthy cup of tea!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

One type of herbal tea is the mullein tea. Despite its slightly bitter taste, it has plenty of health benefits, and it is quite easy to prepare, too. Read this article to find out more about mullein tea’s health benefits and side effects. About Mullein Tea The main ingredient of the mullein tea is the mullein plant. It includes about 250 species of flowering plants that grow in Europe (especially in the Mediterranean region) and Asia. Recently, various species were introduced and even naturalized in America, Australia and Hawaii. The shorter stems of the plant grow up to half a meter, while the tallest can reach 3 meters. There are spirally arranged and often densely hairy leaves in the lower half, while the upper half has five-petal flowers of various colors: yellow, orange, red-brown, purple, blue, or white; the yellow ones are most common. The fruit is a small capsule which contains numerous minute seeds. How to prepare Mullein Tea It only takes a few minutes to prepare a cup of mullein tea. Boil some water, then pour it in a cup, over the mullein dried herbs. Let it steep for about 5 minutes before removing the herbs. If you think the taste is too bitter for you, you can sweeten it with honey, sugar or lemon. Components of Mullein Tea Dried leaves and flowers of the plant are used to make the mullein tea. This way, many components of the plant are transferred to the mullein tea. The components include mucilage, rotenone, flavonoids, iridoids, sterols, and sugars. Mullein Tea Benefits Mullein tea is quite useful when it comes to treating chronic bronchitis, coughs, asthma, pneumonia, congestion, and other respiratory problems. It relaxes the muscles within the chest, loosens the mucus, and helps with expectoration. Also, when you’ve dealing with a sore throat, it helps soothe the throat and chest. Drinking mullein tea helps treat diarrhea and works to expel intestinal parasites, such as worms. It is useful when treating bladder and urinary tract infections, for example hematuria (bloody urine). Also, consumption of mullein tea lessens the pain from hemorrhoids. Mullein tea can also help you if you’re suffering from insomnia, or when you’re dealing with anxiety or high levels of stress. It is good for cleansing the blood, and it can treat various forms of allergies. Also, mullein tea is useful when treating earaches, eczema, inflammations, acne and minor wounds. Mullein Tea Side Effects If you’re preparing the mullein tea on your own, using the leaves of the plant, be careful with the little hairs found on the leaves. When they come in contact with your skin, they can lead to red, itchy or inflamed skin. Despite the fact that it’s used to treat respiratory problems, mullein tea can lead to breathing problems. Although rare, the symptoms in this case include chest wall inflammation, difficulty in inhaling, tightness in the chest, and tightness of the throat. If you experience any of these symptoms, stop drinking mullein tea and go visit your doctor. Also, mullein seeds contain rotenone, which is a potentially toxic substance that, if ingested, may cause severe side effects. Make sure you check to see if the mullein tea you drink is made from mullein seeds. It is generally recommended that you not drink mullein tea if you are pregnant or breast feeding, as it might affect the baby. Don’t drink more than six cups of mullein tea a day. If you do, it won’t be that good for your health anymore. You might experience some of the following symptoms: headaches, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, insomnia, dizziness, and irregular heartbeats. Although bitter, mullein tea is still a delicious type of herbal tea. It comes with many health benefits, as well. Just make sure you won’t experience any side effects. Once it’s all safe, you’re free to enjoy your daily cup of this type of tea.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you want to try a special type of herbal tea, there’s Oregon grape root tea! It has a slightly bitter taste, but that shouldn’t discourage you. It also has plenty of health benefits which are bound to keep you healthy. Read to find out more about Oregon grape root tea! About Oregon Grape Root Tea Oregon grape root tea is made from the root of the Oregon grape. The plant is an evergreen shrub which grows along the North American west coast. The plant can grow up to 5m tall. The leaves are similar to those of holly, and the stems and twigs are thick and corky. The flowers are yellow-colored and bloom in late spring. The fruits are small, purplish-black, with a dusty appearance, and they contain large seeds. The Oregon grape is in no way related to normal grapes. The name of the tree comes from the similarity of its berries to the grapes’ berries. Constituents of Oregon Grape Root Tea It is not surprising that the root is used to make Oregon grape root tea. The root is actually the part of the tea which contains the most active constituents. A cup of Oregon grape root tea contains many alkaloids (berberine) and phytochemicals, as well as tannins. How to prepare Oregon Grape Root Tea It isn’t difficult to make a cup of Oregon grape root tea. Place one teaspoon of dried root in a cup filled with boiling water. Let it steep for about 10-15 minutes. Once the steeping time ends, remove the dried herbs from the cup. If Oregon grape root tea is too bitter for your taste, you can add honey or sugar to sweeten it. Oregon Grape Root Tea Benefits Thanks to its important constituents, Oregon grape root tea brings you many health benefits. First of all, Oregon grape root tea is used in the treatment for dyspepsia (indigestion) and diarrhea, and it helps you fight intestinal parasites. It also increases the speed to the flow of bile, which makes it useful in the treatment for gallbladder pain, gallstones, hepatitis, and jaundice. The alkaloids found in Oregon grape root tea help treat typhoid, tuberculosis in its early stage, and various digestive disorders. It can even help with small problems, such as stomach cramps and abdominal pains. It also works as a potential anti-carcinogenic, speeding up the recovery from chemotherapy and radiation therapies. Oregon grape root teacan work as a lymphatic and liver stimulating blood cleanser. It is good for your liver as it helps release stacked away iron from the liver into the blood stream. It might also help you fight tumors in the bladder and colon. Oregon grape root tea can help you even when it’s applied topically. It is useful when treating psoriasis, eczema, athlete’s foot, acne, and other fungal infections. It also helps in easing inflammation, irritation, and itching of the skin. Oregon Grape Root Tea Side Effects First, it’s not recommended that you drink Oregon grape root tea if you are pregnant. If you do, it might cause uterine contractions. It is also best that you not consume Oregon grape root tea if you’ve gotchronic gastrointestinal irritation or inflammation. It will only worsen the symptoms. Be careful with how much Oregon grape root tea you drink. Don’t have more than six cups of tea a day, and don’t drink for more than 7 consecutive days. If you drink too much Oregon grape root tea, you’ll get the following symptoms: headaches, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, insomnia, dizziness, and irregular heartbeats. Even if it has a slightly bitter taste, Oregon grape root tea shouldn’t be forgotten. Its many health benefits can help you, if needed.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you haven’t tried orris tea before, now is the time. As an herbal tea, it has a bittersweet taste, but it also has important health benefits. Read to find out more about orris tea. About Orris Tea Orris tea is made from orris root, which is the root of the flower Florentine iris from the genus Iris. The plant is grown for ornamental purposes, and it is cultivated mostly in the Mediterranean region, but also in northern India, North Africa and southern Europe. The stems of the flower may reach 1 meter in height, with green, flat and sword-like leaves, and white flowers. Orris root is used for making orris tea. During ancient times, orris root was used to make perfumes, as well as for medical purposes. Later, it was also used in cuisine. Constituents of Orris Tea Orris tea is made from orris root, which has important active constituents. They make orris teagood for our health. A few important ones are starch, myristic acid, and iridin. Also, orris root has various anti-inflammatory flavonoids and isoflavone glycosides. These active constituents make orris tea an important herbal tea with many health benefits. Orris Tea Benefits Orris tea is helpful when you’ve got a cold. Besides this, it can help you when you’ve only got a sore throat and coughing problems, as it’s got strong expectorant properties. Drinking orris tea will help detoxify your body. It will help you in your treatment for congestive heart failure, as well. It is also used in the treatment for dental problems, liver congestion, diarrhea, bronchitis, and dropsy. Orris tea also works as a good diuretic. Because of this, it is helpful when treating heart failure, kidney disease, cirrhosis of the liver, and high blood pressure. Orris Tea Side Effects There aren’t too many known side effects related to the consumption of orris tea; it is mostly considered safe to drink. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you shouldn’t drink orris tea. Although it hasn’t been proven that it can be harmful, there is a possibility that it might affect the baby in both cases. Also, it is generally recommended that you not drink more than six cups of tea per day. This applies to any type of tea, including orris tea. If you drink more tea than your body can take, you might get some of the following symptoms: headaches, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, insomnia, dizziness, and irregular heartbeats.   While orris tea doesn’t have a high number of health benefits, it’s also notable that it doesn’t have any dangerous side effects. Because of this, it is considered safe to consume orris tea every day. Just be careful with the amount.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you want to try something new, drink quassia tea - an herbal tea from South America. Even if its taste is bitter, you won’t regret giving it a try thanks to its many health benefits. Read to find out more about quassia tea! About Quassia Tea Quassia tea is made from the bark of the quassia tree, which can be found in the tropical parts of South America. Quassia is a deciduous tree which can grow up to 30m in height. Its bark is grey, and it has branches full of leaves. The flowers of the tree are yellow, while the fruits are black and pea-shaped. Constituents of Quassia Tea Quassia tea has plenty of health benefits. These can be found in the tea thanks to the active constituents which are transferred from the bark of the tree. Some of the important active constituents are: various quassinoids and alkaloids, beta-sitostenone, beta-sitosterol, calcium tartrate, gallic acid, mallic acid, potassium acetate, and simalikalactone D and E (SkE). How to prepare Quassia Tea If you’re using quassia bark to make a cup of quassia tea, add two teaspoons to a mug full of freshly-boiled water and let it steep for 10 minutes. Stream and sweeten if you wish. If you use teabags, follow the instructions on the box (steeping time should be around 5-7 minutes). You can drink cold quessia tea, too. For this, just soak a handful of tree bark in a mug of cool water. Let it steep for about eight hours before you remove the bark pieces. Quessia Tea Benefits Quessia tea has plenty of health benefits, thanks to its active constituents. They should encourage you to drink this tea, despite its bitter taste. Quessia tea promotes a proper digestion. It also helps expel parasites and lice, clean the blood, and eliminate toxins and bacteria; it is recommended if you’ve got a fever. It is used in the treatment for various diseases: malaria, diarrhea, dysentery and gastric ulcers, for example. Quessia tea is also recommended if you’ve got a tumor. You can drink quessia tea when you feel nervous or stressed. This tea will help you relax, as it will sedate the nerves. It is also useful if you’ve got a bad appetite, or even if you’re suffering from anorexia. Quessia Tea Side Effects You shouldn’t drink quessia tea if you’re pregnant or breast feeding. It can affect the baby in both cases, as well as lead to cell damage and nausea. It is recommended to drink 3-4 cups of quessia tea a day. If you drink too much, you might get a few side effects. These include: irritation of the mouth, throat, and digestive tract, nausea, vomiting, headaches. Long-term consumption of quessia tea might lead to vision changes or even blindness. As quessia tea can irritate the digestive tract, it’s best that you don’t drink it if you’re suffering from digestive tract diseases, such as stomach, intestinal ulcers, or Crohn’s disease. It might worsen your condition. Quessia tea can be consumed every day with no worries. It has important health benefits which should convince you to drink it, despite its bitter taste.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you enjoy a cup of herbal tea, then sarsaparilla tea can count as a good choice for a daily beverage. The many health benefits should also tempt you to give it a try. Find out more about sarsaparilla tea. About Sarsaparilla Tea Sarsaparilla tea is made from the roots of sarsaparilla, a plant native to Central and South America. It is also known by the name Smilax regelii. In Spanish, it is called zarzaparrilla; “zarza” means “shrub” and “parrilla” means “little grape vine”. Sarsaparilla is a perennial plant which has a trailing vine with lots of wood-like stems and long thorns. It has small, greenish flowers which grow in axillary umbels. It is often used to flavor soft drinks. There is also the “false sarsaparilla”, native to South Asia. It belongs to a different plant family and genus, and it is often used in place of sarsaparilla. The false sarsaparilla is a slender shrub with woody and aromatic roots and many slender stems. It has small leaves and greenish flowers. Sarsaparilla Tea Constituents Both types of sarsaparilla have their own active constituents. The usual type includes sarsasaponin, sarsaparilloside, flavonoids, sarsapac acid, dextrose, and fatty acids. Meanwhile, the “false sarsaparilla” has some of the following constituents: coumarins, saraponins, starch, tannins, tannic acid, glucose, phenols, iron, and magnesium. Both the American type and the South Asian one can be used to make sarsaparilla tea, which gets the active constituents found in the roots. How to prepare Sarsaparilla Tea No matter the variety, you can easily prepare a cup of sarsaparilla tea. Just add about 1 gram of chopped dried root to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for about 10 minutes; then, stream to remove the root pieces. Sarsaparilla Tea Benefits The American and South Asian sarsaparilla root share a few health benefits, which are transferred to sarsaparilla tea, as well. They are used to treat various skin problems, such as eczema or psoriasis. Drinking sarsaparilla tea also helps you with arthritis, gout, and rheumatism. This tea is also included in the treatment of various sexual diseases, such as herpes, gonorrhea or syphilis. Drinking sarsaparilla tea might help improve your memory and mental concentration. It also helps with urinary tract infections, and menopausal symptoms. It can even be applied topically, to treat sores and burns. The tea made with the American sarsaparilla is believed to improve the sexual performance, and to enhance virility. If you’re using the ‘false sarsaparilla’ to make sarsaparilla tea, this can help fight various digestive problems and upper respiratory infections. Sarsaparilla Tea Side Effects It is recommended not to drink sarsaparilla tea if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. Sarsaparilla tea can affect the baby in both cases. Also, don’t drink this tea if you’ve got asthma; it might worsen your condition. If you’re under any kind of medication (especially if you’re taking other diuretics), make sure you talk with your doctor first before you start drinking sarsaparilla tea. Also, be careful with the amount of sarsaparilla tea you drink. If you drink too much, it might cause digestive problems. Sarsaparilla tea is a pleasant everyday herbal tea. With its many health benefits, just one cup can help you stay healthy.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you’re a fan of herbal teas, you have to try saw palmetto tea! It’s special, as it is made from the berries of a small palm. Read more about its health benefits and side effects! About Saw Palmetto Tea Saw palmetto tea is made from the fruit saw palmetto, also known by its scientific name, Serenoa repens. It is the sole species which remains classified in the genus Serenoa. It is a small palm, native to the southeastern part of the United States. Its height varies between 2 and 4m. Its leaves are 1-2m long and have a bare petiole, with a rounded fan of about 20 leaflets at the end; the petiole has fine, sharp teeth or spines. The flowers are small, yellowish-white and produced in dense panicles, and the fruit is a large, reddish-black berry. How to prepare Saw Palmetto Tea A cup of saw palmetto tea can be prepared with either the plant’s berries, or normal teabags. In case you’re using saw palmetto berries, add a teaspoon of the fruits to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for about 5 minutes, before you strain to remove the berries. Sweeten it, if necessary, with honey or fruit juice. If you’ve got saw palmetto tea bags, follow the instructions on the tea box. Saw Palmetto Tea Constituents Saw palmetto tea gets many active constituents from its main ingredient: saw palmetto berries. The constituents of the berries include a high concentration of fatty acids and phytosterols, as well as beta-sitosterol, capric acid, ferulic acid, palmitic acid, and stearic acid. Saw Palmetto Tea Benefits Saw palmetto tea is known for its important role in treating urinary tract infections. Drinking this tea helps to gently stimulate urination; thanks to this, the infectious microorganisms are “flushed out” along with the urine. Drinking saw palmetto tea helps remove toxins and waste products which can affect and reduce the functions of the kidneys, liver, and bladder. It also helps with the digestive system; it is drunk to treat diarrhea, acid reflux, gas, bloating, and irritable bowel syndrome. Saw palmetto tea also helps calm coughs and treats various forms of chest congestion. It is useful if you’ve got a headache. It can be used to treat benign prostate enlargement and prostatitis, as well. Saw Palmetto Tea Side Effects You shouldn’t drink saw palmetto tea if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. It can act like a hormone, which might lead to problems. Drinking saw palmetto tea before a surgery is also bad. It might slow down the blood clotting process, which might lead to extra bleeding both during and after the surgery. It is recommended that you stop drinking this tea two weeks before you’ve got a surgery scheduled. Although rare, the possibility of getting an allergic reaction to saw palmetto tea still exists. Symptoms include rashes, itchiness, difficulty in breathing, and swelling of the mouth, tongue or nose. Also, be careful with the amount of saw palmetto tea you drink. The recommended amount is 3-4 cups a day. If you drink too much, you might get some of the following symptoms: dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and diarrhea. Saw palmetto tea can easily be used as a daily hot beverage. You’re bound to enjoy both the taste and its many health benefits.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

When it comes to self-heal tea, the title should say enough. This herbal tea is known for its many health benefits, which should make it a must-drink for many people. Find out more about self-heal tea! About Self-Heal Tea Self-heal tea is made from Prunella vulgaris, which is commonly called self-heal or heal-all. It is an herbaceous plant which can be found in places with temperate climate throughout Europe, Asia and North America. Self-heal is a low-growing perennial weed, part of the mint family. It has a height between 5 and 30cm. It has lance shaped and serrated leaves, pretty reddish at the tip. The flowers during summer, are tubular, and grow in a whirled cluster. They are also two lipped; the top lip is purple, while the bottom lip is usually white. How to prepare Self-Heal Tea To enjoy some self-heal tea, add two teaspoonfuls of dehydrated self heal leaves or flowers to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for about 10 minutes. Then, strain to remove the leaves or flowers, and sweeten if necessary with honey or fruit juice. Self-Heal Tea Constituents Self-heal tea uses the leaves and flowers of the self-heal plant. These have important active constituents which are transferred to the tea, as well. Some of them include betulinic-acid, D-camphor, delphinidin, hyperoside, oleanolic-acid, rosmarinic-acid, rutin, ursolic-acid, and tannins. Also, self-heal tea has lots of vitamins. One cup of tea includes vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin C, and vitamin K. Self-Heal Tea Benefits Self-heal tea has various health benefits. It can be used to treat diarrhea or eye infections, such as stye and conjunctivitis. When it comes to diseases, self-heal tea is often included in the treatment for Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, gynecological disorders, and even AIDS/HIV. It also lowers blood pressure and helps with an upset stomach or internal bleeding. Self-heal tea can be used topically, as well. It can be applied on cuts, bruises and wounds in order to disinfect them and hasten the healing process. Also, it is used to treat boils. You can also use self-heal tea to gargle, or as mouth wash. Like this, it can treat sore throats, or mouth and throat ulcers. Self-Heal Tea Side Effects There aren’t any known side effects to self-heal tea. It is still generally recommended that pregnant and breastfeeding women shouldn’t drink this herbal tea, because it might affect the baby in some way. It is considered best not to drink more than 2-3 cups of self-heal tea a day. If you drink too much, you might get headaches, diarrhea, loss of appetite, or feel dizzy or nauseous.   Just like its name promises, self-heal tea has plenty of important health benefits. Meanwhile, it has very few side effects. Knowing this, you should give it a try!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

MILK-THISTLE

Milk Thistle tea is a type of herbal tea made from the plant with the same name: milk thistle. The plant has many health benefits, therefore making the tea good for your body. Find out more about the milk thistle tea in this article. About Milk Thistle Tea The main ingredient of the milk thistle tea is, of course, the milk thistle; it is made from the seeds of the plant. The milk thistle is a flowering plant of the daisy family, an annual or biennial herb which grows in the Mediterranean regions of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. The stem is tall, branched but with no spines, and has large, alternate leaves. At the end of the stem, there are large flower heads, disk-shaped and pink-purple in color. The fruit of the plants consists of a black achene with a white pappus. The name of the plant comes from the way its leaves look. The edges of the leaves are streaked with milky-white veins. How to prepare Milk Thistle Tea You can easily prepare a cup of milk thistle tea in no more than 10 minutes. First, boil the water necessary for a cup of milk thistle tea. Add one teaspoon of milk thistle tea seeds and then, add the hot water. Let it steep for 4-7 minutes, depending on how strong you want the flavor of the tea to be. During summer, you can also try the iced tea version of the milk thistle tea. Place 6 teaspoons into a teapot or a heat resistant pitcher and then pour one and a half cups of boiled water. Let it steep for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, get a serving pitcher and fill it with cold water. Once the steeping time is done, pour the tea over the cold water, add ice, and then pour more cold water. Add sugar, honey or anything else you want to sweeten the taste. Benefits of Milk Thistle Tea The main health benefit of the milk thistle tea is related to its effectiveness in protecting the liver, thanks to one of its components, Silymarin. Silymarin is the main active ingredient of the milk thistle tea, working both as an anti-inflammatory and as an antioxidant. It helps with cirrhosis, jaundice, hepatitis, and gallbladder disorders. It also detoxifies the liver, as well as helping it by cleansing the blood. If you’ve got type 2 diabetes, drinkingmilk thistle tea might help you a lot, as well. Some of the benefits of milk thistle tea, related to diabetes, are:decrease in blood sugar levels, improvement in cholesterol and improvement in insulin resistance.  Also, by lowering the LDL “bad” cholesterol levels, milk thistle tea can help lower the chances of developing heart diseases. Other health benefits of milk thistle tea involve increasing the secretion of the bile in order to enhance the flow in the intestinal tract, helping to ease kidney and bladder irritations, and helping to remove obstructions in the spleen. Milk Thistle Tea side effects Despite its important health benefits, don’t forget that there are also a few side effects you might experience when drinking milk thistle tea. If you regularly drink milk thistle teafor a long period of time, it might end up having laxative effects. That can easily lead to diarrhea and, in some rare cases, it can also lead to nausea, gases, and an upset and bloating stomach. You should avoid drinking milk thistle tea if you know that you have a ragweed allergy. In this case, it can cause a rash or lead to more severe allergic reactions. Milk thistle tea also isn’t recommended to women who are pregnant or breast feeding. The main ingredient of milk thistle tea, the milk thistle herb, may mimic the effects of estrogen. Because of this, some women should avoid drinking milk thistle tea. This refers to women who have fibroid tumors or endometriosis, as well as women who are suffering from breast, uterine, and/or ovarian cancer. Also, don’t drink more than six cups of milk thistle tea (or any other type of tea) a day. Otherwise, it won’t be as helpful as it should be. The symptoms you might get are headaches, dizziness, insomnia, irregular heartbeats, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. Try the milk thistle tea! As an herbal tea, it helps you stay healthy, especially by protecting your liver. Still, don’t forget about the few side effects.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you’re a fan of herbal teas, you have to try myrtle tea. It has a refreshing taste, slightly fruity and sweet. It also brings plenty of health benefits in just a cup of tea. Read to find out more about the myrtle tea. About Myrtle Tea The main ingredient of the myrtle tea is myrtle, the herbal plant. It is a type of flowering plant belonging to the Myrtaceae family, with one or two species. It can be found in the Mediterranean regions of both Europe and Africa. The plant is an evergreen shrub or small tree, which can grow up to 5 meters tall. The leaves are 3-5cm long, with a fragrant essential oil. It also has a star-like flower with five white petals and sepals, and numerous stamens. The fruit of the plant is a round berry, most commonly blue-black in color; it contains several seeds. The plant has been known since ancient times. It is found in the Greek mythology, where it is known to be sacred to Aphrodite and Demeter. Also, many Greek writers have mentioned it in their works; some of them are Hippocrates, Pliny and Dioscorides. How to prepare Myrtle Tea It doesn’t take long to prepare a cup of myrtle tea. While you wait for the water to boil, add a few leaves to your cup. Pour the water in the cup and let it steep for 3-5 minutes. After you remove the leaves, you can enjoy your cup of myrtle tea. Benefits of Myrtle Tea Just like many herbal teas, the myrtle tea is also good for your health. Read to find out more about its health benefits. Drinking myrtle tea can help you if you’ve got throat problems. It is quite useful in the treatment of dry coughing. Myrtle tea is also helpful if you’re suffering from bronchial congestion, sinusitis, or other respiratory problems. Myrtle tea is well-known for promoting a good digestion, by helping you combat various digestive problems and disorders. It is used in the treatment of urinary tract disorders, and may also help in the treatment for cerebral infections and epilepsy. Also, you can use myrtle tea topically. It can be applied on fresh wounds and bruises in order to prevent infections. Side effects of Myrtle Tea Check if myrtle tea contains myrtle oil. The oil contains a chemical that might do you harm, by causing asthma-like attacks and lung failure. You should avoid drinking myrtle tea if you’re pregnant or breast feeding. In both cases, it can be harmful to the baby. It is also recommended that you not give myrtle tea to small children, as it might lead to breathing problems. Also, don’t drink too much myrtle tea. Generally, it is recommended that you not drink more than six cups of tea a day, no matter what type of tea. Otherwise, you might get some of the following symptoms: headaches, dizziness, insomnia, irregular heartbeats, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. Myrtle tea is a delicious, slightly sweet herbal tea which can easily be included in your daily diet. Thanks to its many health benefits, it is even recommended that you drink it daily. As long as you’re not pregnant, it will only do you good.... Beneficial Teas

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

(Brandy, gin, rum, tequila, whiskey, vodka) Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Moderate to high Protein: None Fat: None Saturated fat: None Cholesterol: None Carbohydrates: None (except for cordials which contain added sugar) Fiber: None Sodium: Low Major vitamin contribution: None Major mineral contribution: Phosphorus About the Nutrients in This Food Spirits are the clear liquids produced by distilling the fermented sugars of grains, fruit, or vegetables. The yeasts that metabolize these sugars and convert them into alcohol stop growing when the concentration of alcohol rises above 12–15 percent. In the United States, the proof of an alcoholic beverage is defined as twice its alcohol content by volume: a beverage with 20 percent alcohol by volume is 40 proof. This is high enough for most wines, but not high enough for most whiskies, gins, vodkas, rums, brandies, and tequilas. To reach the concentra- tion of alcohol required in these beverages, the fermented sugars are heated and distilled. Ethyl alcohol (the alcohol in beer, wine, and spirits) boils at a lower temperature than water. When the fermented sugars are heated, the ethyl alcohol escapes from the distillation vat and condenses in tubes leading from the vat to a collection vessel. The clear liquid that collects in this vessel is called distilled spirits or, more technically, grain neutral spirits. Gins, whiskies, cordials, and many vodkas are made with spirits American whiskeys (which include bourbon, rye, and distilled from grains. blended whiskeys) and Canadian, Irish, and Scotch whiskies are all made from spirits aged in wood barrels. They get their flavor from the grains and their color from the barrels. (Some whiskies are also colored with caramel.) Vodka is made from spirits distilled and filtered to remove all flavor. By law, vodkas made in America must be made with spirits distilled from grains. Imported vodkas may be made with spirits distilled either from grains or potatoes and may contain additional flavoring agents such as citric acid or pepper. Aquavit, for example, is essentially vodka flavored with caraway seeds. Gin is a clear spirit flavored with an infusion of juniper berries and other herbs (botanicals). Cordials (also called liqueurs) and schnapps are flavored spirits; most are sweetened with added sugar. Some cordials contain cream. Rum is made with spirits distilled from sugar cane (molasses). Tequila is made with spirits distilled from the blue agave plant. Brandies are made with spirits distilled from fruit. (Arma- gnac and cognac are distilled from fermented grapes, calvados and applejack from fermented apples, kirsch from fermented cherries, slivovitz from fermented plums.) Unless they contain added sugar or cream, spirits have no nutrients other than alcohol. Unlike food, which has to be metabolized before your body can use it for energy, alcohol can be absorbed into the blood-stream directly from the gastrointestinal tract. Ethyl alcohol provides 7 calories per gram. The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food The USDA /Health and Human Services Dietary Guidelines for Americans defines one drink as 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.25 ounces of distilled spirits, and “moderate drinking” as two drinks a day for a man, one drink a day for a woman. Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Bland diet Lactose-free diet (cream cordials made with cream or milk) Low-purine (antigout) diet Buying This Food Look for: Tightly sealed bottles stored out of direct sunlight, whose energy might disrupt the structure of molecules in the beverage and alter its flavor. Choose spirits sold only by licensed dealers. Products sold in these stores are manufac- tured under the strict supervision of the federal government. Storing This Food Store sealed or opened bottles of spirits in a cool, dark cabinet. Preparing This Food All spirits except unflavored vodkas contain volatile molecules that give the beverage its characteristic taste and smell. Warming the liquid excites these molecules and intensifies the flavor and aroma, which is the reason we serve brandy in a round glass with a narrower top that captures the aromatic molecules as they rise toward the air when we warm the glass by holding it in our hands. Whiskies, too, though traditionally served with ice in America, will have a more intense flavor and aroma if served at room temperature. What Happens When You Cook This Food The heat of cooking evaporates the alcohol in spirits but leaves the flavoring intact. Like other alcoholic beverages, spirits should be added to a recipe near the end of the cooking time to preserve the flavor while cooking away any alcohol bite. Alcohol is an acid. If you cook it in an aluminum or iron pot, it will combine with metal ions to form dark compounds that discolor the pot and the food you are cooking. Any recipe made with spirits should be prepared in an enameled, glass, or stainless-steel pot. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Reduced risk of heart attack. Data from the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study 1, a 12-year survey of more than 1 million Americans in 25 states, shows that men who take one drink a day have a 21 percent lower risk of heart attack and a 22 percent lower risk of stroke than men who do not drink at all. Women who have up to one drink a day also reduce their risk of heart attack. Numerous later studies have confirmed these findings. Lower cholesterol levels. Beverage alcohol decreases the body’s production and storage of low density lipoproteins (LDLs), the protein and fat particles that carry cholesterol into your arteries. As a result, people who drink moderately tend to have lower cholesterol levels and higher levels of high density lipoproteins (HDLs), the fat and protein particles that carry cholesterol out of the body. Numerous later studies have confirmed these findings. Lower risk of stroke. In January 1999, the results of a 677-person study published by researchers at New York Presbyterian Hospital-Columbia University showed that moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of stroke due to a blood clot in the brain among older people (average age: 70). How alcohol prevents stroke is still unknown, but it is clear that moderate use is a key. Heavy drinkers (those who consume more than seven drinks a day) have a higher risk of stroke. People who once drank heavily, but cut their consumption to moderate levels, reduce their risk of stroke. Stimulating the appetite. Alcoholic beverages stimulate the production of saliva and the gastric acids that cause the stomach contractions we call hunger pangs. Moderate amounts of alcoholic beverages, which may help stimulate appetite, are often prescribed for geriatric patients, convalescents, and people who do not have ulcers or other chronic gastric problems that might be exacerbated by the alcohol. Dilation of blood vessels. Alcoholic beverages dilate the tiny blood vessels just under the skin, bringing blood up to the surface. That’s why moderate amounts of alcoholic beverages (0.2–1 gram per kilogram of body weight, or two ounces of whiskey for a 150-pound adult) temporarily warm the drinker. But the warm blood that flows up to the surface of the skin will cool down there, making you even colder when it circulates back into the center of your body. Then an alcohol flush will make you perspire, so you lose more heat. Excessive amounts of beverage alcohol may depress the mechanism that regulates body temperature. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Alcoholism. Alcoholism is an addiction disease, the inability to control one’s alcohol consumption. It is a potentially life-threatening condition, with a higher risk of death by accident, suicide, malnutrition, or acute alcohol poisoning, a toxic reaction that kills by para- lyzing body organs, including the heart. Fetal alcohol syndrome. Fetal alcohol syndrome is a specific pattern of birth defects—low birth weight, heart defects, facial malformations, learning disabilities, and mental retarda- tion—first recognized in a study of babies born to alcoholic women who consumed more than six drinks a day while pregnant. Subsequent research has found a consistent pattern of milder defects in babies born to women who drink three to four drinks a day or five drinks on any one occasion while pregnant. To date there is no evidence of a consistent pattern of birth defects in babies born to women who consume less than one drink a day while preg- nant, but two studies at Columbia University have suggested that as few as two drinks a week while pregnant may raise a woman’s risk of miscarriage. (One drink is 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.25 ounces of distilled spirits.) Increased risk of breast cancer. In 2008, scientists at the National Cancer Institute released data from a seven-year survey of more than 100,000 postmenopausal women showing that even moderate drinking (one to two drinks a day) may increase by 32 percent a woman’s risk of developing estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) and progesterone-receptor positive (PR+) breast cancer, tumors whose growth is stimulated by hormones. No such link was found between consuming alcohol and the risk of developing ER-/PR- tumors (not fueled by hor- mones). The finding applies to all types of alcohol: beer, wine, and distilled spirits. Increased risk of oral cancer (cancer of the mouth and throat). Numerous studies confirm the A merican Cancer Societ y’s warn ing that men and women who consume more than t wo drinks a day are at higher risk of oral cancer than are nondrinkers or people who drink less. Increased risk of cancer of the colon and rectum. In the mid-1990s, studies at the University of Oklahoma suggested that men who drink more than five beers a day are at increased risk of rectal cancer. Later studies suggested that men and women who are heavy beer or spirits drinkers (but not those who are heavy wine drinkers) have a higher risk of colorectal cancers. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. Malnutrition. While moderate alcohol consumption stimulates appetite, alcohol abuses depresses it. In addition, an alcoholic may drink instead of eating. When an alcoholic does eat, excess alcohol in his/her body prevents absorption of nutrients and reduces the ability to synthesize new tissue. Hangover. Alcohol is absorbed from the stomach and small intestine and carried by the bloodstream to the liver, where it is oxidized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the enzyme our bodies use every day to metabolize the alcohol we produce when we digest carbohydrates. The acetaldehyde is converted to acetyl coenzyme A and either eliminated from the body or used in the synthesis of cholesterol, fatty acids, and body tis- sues. Although individuals vary widely in their capacity to metabolize alcohol, an adult of average size can metabolize the alcohol in four ounces (120 ml) whiskey in approximately five to six hours. If he or she drinks more than that, the amount of alcohol in the body will exceed the available supply of ADH. The surplus, unmetabolized alcohol will pile up in the bloodstream, interfering with the liver’s metabolic functions. Since alcohol decreases the reabsorption of water from the kidneys and may inhibit the secretion of an antidiuretic hormone, the drinker will begin to urinate copiously, losing magnesium, calcium, and zinc but retaining uric acid, which is irritating. The level of lactic acid in the body will increase, making him or her feel tired and out of sorts; the acid-base balance will be out of kilter; the blood vessels in the head will swell and throb; and the stomach, its lining irritated by the alcohol, will ache. The ultimate result is a hangover whose symptoms will disappear only when enough time has passed to allow the body to marshal the ADH needed to metabolize the extra alcohol in the person’s blood. Changes in body temperature. Alcohol dilates capillaries, tiny blood vessels just under the skin, producing a “flush” that temporarily warms the drinker. But drinking is not an effective way to stay warm in cold weather. Warm blood flowing up from the body core to the surface capillaries is quickly chilled, making you even colder when it circulates back into your organs. In addition, an alcohol flush triggers perspiration, further cooling your skin. Finally, very large amounts of alcohol may actually depress the mechanism that regulates body temperature. Impotence. Excessive drinking decreases libido (sexual desire) and interferes with the ability to achieve or sustain an erection. Migraine headache. Some alcoholic beverages contain chemicals that inhibit PST, an enzyme that breaks down certain alcohols in spirits so that they can be eliminated from the body. If they are not broken down by PST, these alcohols will build up in the bloodstream and may trigger a migraine headache. Gin and vodka appear to be the distilled spirits least likely to trigger headaches, brandy the most likely. Food/Drug Interactions Acetaminophen (Tylenol, etc.). FDA recommends that people who regularly have three or more drinks a day consult a doctor before using acetaminophen. The alcohol/acetaminophen combination may cause liver failure. Anti-alcohol abuse drugs (disulfiram [Antabuse]). Taken concurrently with alcohol, the anti- alcoholism drug disulfiram can cause flushing, nausea, a drop in blood pressure, breathing difficulty, and confusion. The severity of the symptoms, which may var y among individu- als, generally depends on the amount of alcohol consumed and the amount of disulfiram in the body. Anticoagulants. Alcohol slows the body’s metabolism of anticoagulants (blood thinners), intensif ying the effect of the drugs and increasing the risk of side effects such as spontane- ous nosebleeds. Antidepressants. Alcohol may strengthen the sedative effects of antidepressants. Aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Like alco- hol, these analgesics irritate the lining of the stomach and may cause gastric bleeding. Com- bining the two intensifies the effect. Insulin and oral hypoglycemics. Alcohol lowers blood sugar and interferes with the metabo- lism of oral antidiabetics; the combination may cause severe hypoglycemia. Sedatives and other central nervous system depressants (tranquilizers, sleeping pills, antide- pressants, sinus and cold remedies, analgesics, and medication for motion sickness). Alcohol intensifies the sedative effects of these medications and, depending on the dose, may cause drowsiness, sedation, respiratory depression, coma, or death. MAO inhibitors. Monoamine oxidase (M AO) inhibitors are drugs used as antidepressants or antihypertensives. They inhibit the action of natural enzymes that break down tyramine, a substance formed naturally when proteins are metabolized. Tyramine is a pressor amine, a chemical that constricts blood vessel and raises blood pressure. If you eat a food that contains tyramine while you are taking an M AO inhibitor, the pressor amine cannot be eliminated from your body and the result may be a hypertensive crisis (sustained elevated blood pressure). Brandy, a distilled spirit made from wine (which is fermented) contains tyramine. All other distilled spirits may be excluded from your diet when you are taking an M AO inhibitor because the spirits and the drug, which are both sedatives, may be hazard- ous in combination.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Beneficial Teas

If you haven’t heard much about plantain tea, it’s time to find out! As an herbal tea, it has a pretty pleasant, earthy taste, as well as many health benefits. About Plantain Tea Plantain tea is made from plantain. It is a perennial plant that grows all around the world, in Europe, Asia, Africa and America. The plantain has a tough rhizome with several large, dark green leaves. The flowers of the plant are brown, with four stamens and purple-colored anthers and the fruit is a two-celled capsule with seeds inside it. Many consider this plant to be a weed. However, the leaves are edible, and are often used in salads, or cooked as greens. Plantain Tea constituents Plantain, as an herbal plant, has many important active constituents. They include beta carotene, calcium, linoleic acid, oleanolic acid, sorbitol, tannin, and vitamin C. They are all transferred to plantain tea, as well. How to prepare Plantain Tea For a cup of plantain tea, you can use the leaves, roots and/or seeds of the plant. Just add one tablespoon of the dried plants to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for about 10 minutes, then strain. You can drink it both hot and cold. Plantain Tea Benefits Plantain tea is often used in the treatment of various respiratory problems, as it acts as a mild expectorant. These include asthma, bronchitis, sinusitis, sore throats, and coughs. Plantain tea can also be used to lower blood pressure and control sugar blood levels. Drinking plantain tea can help you if you’ve got diarrhea or dysentery. It is also used to treat irritated or bleeding hemorrhoids, kidney and bladder problems, bleeding caused by cystitis, and urinary tract infections. Plantain tea can be used topically, as well. It works as an antivenin, and it also promotes the healing of various wounds, skin inflammations, scars, cuts, rashes, and swellings. It can also be applied to the eye, in case your eyes are irritated. Plantain Tea Side Effects If you’re pregnant, it’s best to avoid drinking plantain tea. It can affect the uterus, which might lead to unwanted miscarriages. It is not known how safe it is to drink plantain tea if you’re breast feeding, but it is recommended to avoid it, just in case it might affect the baby. Don’t drink plantain tea if you’re allergic to any plants part of the plantain family. Also, you might get an allergic reaction from drinking the tea if you’re allergic to melon. Drinking too much plantain tea may lead to some side effects, as well. Generally, it is recommended that you not drink more than 5-6 cups of tea, no matter the type of tea. If you’re drinking too much tea, you might get some of the following symptoms: diarrhea, low blood pressure, headaches, loss of appetite, vomiting, insomnia, dizziness, and irregular heartbeats. Plantain tea helps you stay healthy! It is considered safe for both children and adults. Just be careful with the few side effects and you’re free to enjoy plantain tea!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Rhodiola tea is a delicious, mellow herbal tea. With its plant growing in cold, mountainous regions, this tea has various important health benefits. Find out more about rhodiola tea! About Rhodiola Tea Rhodiola tea is made from the rhodiola rosea plant. It grows in cold, mountainous areas, such as the Arctic, the mountains of Central Asia, the Rocky Mountains, and European mountains (Alps, Pyrenees, Carpathian Mountains). It is also known by the names golden root, rose root, Aaron’s rod, arctic root, king’s crown, lignum rhodium, and orpin rose. Rhodiola is a perennial plant with spikes of green leaves. The shoots can grow up to 35cm, and each bear a single yellow flower, which blooms during the Arctic summer. How to prepare Rhodiola Tea It takes awhile to prepare rhodiola tea, but it should be worth it. To enjoy a cup, you have to follow a few steps. For one cup, you need about 5 g of rhodiola root. Put that into a cup of freshly boiled water and let it brew for about 4 hours. Once the time is up, filter the liquid and your tea. Add honey or fruit juice if you want to sweeten the flavor. Rhodiola Tea Constituents Rhodiola rosea has lots of active constituents. Some of the important ones include rosavin, rosin, rosarin, rhodioloside, tyrosol, and salidroside. In its composition, we can also find phenolic antioxidants: proanthocyanidins, quercetin, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, kaempferol. As rhodiola tea is made from the rhodiola rosea plant, these constituents are transferred to the tea, as well. Rhodiola Tea Benefits The most important health benefits of rhodiola tea are related to your mental state. It helps if you’re feeling depressed; it improves your mood and fills you with energy. It also reduces fatigue and stress, and it’s bound to make you feel more relaxed. Generally, it helps enhance your mental functions, including your memory. By reducing stress levels, rhodiola tea also reduces the amount of stress hormones which can cause heart problems. Rhodiola tea regulates your heartbeats and fights against heart arrhythmias. Men can drink rhodiola tea if they’ve got erectile dysfunction; this tea is often included in the treatment. It’s useful for women too, as it helps lose weight and can therefore be drunk when on a diet. At the same time, it can also help with anaemia. You should drink rhodiola tea to help you with muscle recovery after exhaustive exercising. This tea increases the level of enzymes, RNA, and proteins needed.Rhodiola tea can help if you’ve got a cold or the flu. Interestingly, it will also help you if you’ve got altitude sickness. Rhodiola Tea Side Effects Even if rhodiola tea has so many health benefits, there are a few side effects you should be careful with, too. It is best not to be consumed by pregnant women, or those who are breastfeeding. In both cases, rhodiola tea can affect the baby. Even if rhodiola tea is used to treat depression, it is not good when it comes to bipolar disorder. Make sure you talk with your doctor first if you’re not sure whether you should drink rhodiola tea or not. Also, as rhodiola tea is used to enhance your energy, you should not drink it in the evening or even worse, before going to bed. It might lead to insomnia. Rhodiola tea should be on your list of ‘teas to drink’. You don’t have to worry when on a diet, as it will also help you lose weight. Just make sure you won’t get any side effects and you’re safe to drink it!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Safflower tea has a strong, but pleasant taste. As an herbal tea, it comes with many health benefits which are bound to help you stay healthy. Find out more about safflower tea! About Safflower Tea Safflower tea is made from the petals of safflower. The plant is an herbaceous, annual herb, which is cultivated in over sixty countries worldwide. It is a highly branched plant, with heights between 30cm and 150cm. Each branch has from one to five globular flower heads, with yellow, orange, or red flowers. The flower heads also contain 15-20 small seeds. The plant grows in open, arid environments; it is harvested during summertime. The plant was initially cultivated for its seeds, which are used to flavor and color food, as well as to make red and yellow dyes. Lately, the seeds are also used to make vegetable oil. How to prepare Safflower Tea You can easily prepare a cup of safflower tea. Just add a teaspoon of dried safflower petals to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for about 5 minutes, before you strain it to remove the petals. Your cup of safflower tea is ready! If the taste isn’t to your liking, you can sweeten the tea with honey or fruit juice. Safflower Tea Benefits A cup of safflower tea can help soothe your nerves, as well as relax you. Also, it can treat fevers, coughs and bronchial spasms. Generally, it is good at strengthening your immunity. Drinking safflower tea will also lower your bad cholesterol levels; this leads to preventing various heart diseases. It helps in the case of intestinal disorders, and it also facilitates bowel movement. Safflower tea can improve the conditions of cancer patients. This is why it is often included in the treatment for various types of cancer. Also, it can prevent osteoporosis, especially in the case of postmenopausal women. Safflower tea can be applied topically, as well. It is used to treat various bruises, open wounds, or rashes, as well as other skin disorders. Safflower Tea Side Effects Safflower tea doesn’t have many side effects. An important one is related to pregnant and breastfeeding women, who shouldn’t consume this tea. During pregnancy, it can even lead to miscarriages. It’s best not to drink thistea if you have bleeding problems. Safflower tea can slow down the blood clotting process, which might affect you if you’ve got hemorrhagic diseases, stomach or intestinal ulcers, or clotting disorders. Also, stop drinking it two weeks before a surgery, as it might cause bleeding during and after the surgery. Some people might be allergic to plants from the Asteraceae or Compositae family. Beside safflower, these include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, and daisies. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include swelling of the nose, lips and tongue, rashes and difficulty in breathing. If you get any of these, stop drinking safflower tea and contact your doctor.   Safflower tea is a good choice for an everyday tea. With this herbal tea, you get to enjoy both its taste and its many health benefits.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Get a taste of South America by drinking pau d’arco tea. It has a pleasant, earthy taste, astringent and just a bit bitter. Find out more about its health benefits and side effects! About Pau D’Arco Tea Pau D’Arco tea uses the inner bark of the Pink Ipê tree, also known as Pink Lapacho. The tree can be found in many South American countries. The Pink Lapacho is a large tree which can grow up to 30m tall. Usually, the trunk represents a third of that height, while the rest is used by the tree’s branches. The bark is dark brown, tough and hard to peel, and its branches spring up with opposite and petiolate leaves, and large, tubular-shaped pink flowers which bloom between July and September. How to make Pau D’Arco Tea To enjoy some pau d’arco tea, add 3 tablespoons to a pot containing 1 liter of water and bring it to boiling point. Once it reaches boiling point, lower the heat to medium-low and leave it like this for about 20 minutes. Once that’s done, strain the tea and pour it into cups. Pau d’arco tea can be served both hot and cold. If you want to, you can sweeten it with honey, stevia or fruit juice. Pau D’Arco Tea Benefits The inner bark of the Pink Lapacho tea has important active constituents, such as lapachol, lapachone and isolapachone, as well as various flavonoids and tannins. They are transferred to the pau d’arco tea; this way, the beverage helps us stay healthy. Pau d’arco tea plays an important role in the help against cancer. Cancer patients who have consumed this tea have shown progress, from alleviation of chemotherapy symptoms to complete remission of the cancerous tumors. Pau d’arco tea is also useful in the treatment of other diseases, such as diabetes, fibromyalgia, and lupus. Drinking pau d’arco tea can help if you’ve got a cold or the flu. It is also useful as a remedy for smoker’s cough, and acts as an expectorant, stimulating coughing in order to get rid of mucus. It was also discovered that pau d’arco tea increases the production of red blood cells. Although researches are still being made in this area, it is recommended in the treatment for leukemia, anemia and other blood disorders. Pau d’arco tea is also useful in fighting fungi. It is used to treat yeast infection and candida, due to its antifungal nature. It can help in the treatment for stomach ulcers, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and dysentery. It also protects you against tropical diseases (malaria, schistosomiasis). Pau D’Arco Tea Side Effects Pau d’arco tea may act like a blood thinner. Don’t drink this tea at least two weeks before a surgery, otherwise it might increase the risk of bleeding both during and after the surgery, and can decrease the blood clotting speed. You also shouldn’t drink pau d’arco tea if you’ve got a bleeding disorder (hemophilia) or if you’re taking anticoagulants. If you’re taking any medication, talk to your doctor first before drinking pau d’arco tea. It may interfere with various medications, for example aspirin, enoxaparin, warfarin, and dalteparin. It is also recommended that you not drink pau d’arco tea if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. During pregnancy, it can lead to child defects or even death of the baby. It can also affect the baby during breastfeeding. Be careful with the amount of pau d’arco tea you drink a day. The maximum amount of tea you can drink a day is 1 liter. If you drink more, it might lead to nausea, vomiting or bleeding (in which case you should consult a doctor). Other symptoms include headaches, dizziness and diarrhea. Pau d’arco tea has lots of important health benefits, but it also has a few side effects which you should remember. If you make sure it’s safe to drink this tea, you can enjoy it with no worries!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Drinking sassafras tea has both its pros and cons. The health benefits tempt you to give it a try. However, you should be aware of its side effects, as well. Find out more about both the health benefits and the side effects of sassafras tea. About Sassafras Tea Sassafras tea is made from the roots or leaves of the sassafras tree. This tree can be found in eastern North America and eastern Asia. The tree’s height varies between 9m and 18m. It has a thick trunk, with many thin branches and a smooth, orange-brown bark. The leaves have three distinct patterns (unlobed, bilobed, trilobed); they have smooth margins and can be 7-20cm long. The trees have small, yellow flowers with five petals, and a blue-black, egg-shaped fruit. The leaves are often used to season dishes. Also, rootbeer got its name from the oil extracted from sassafras tree root. How to make Sassafras Tea Both sassafras tree root and leaves can be used to make a cup of sassafras tea. Add a handful of either root or leaves to a pot of boiling water. Cover and let it steep for about 20 minutes. Once the steeping time is done, strain to clear the liquid. Sassafras Tea Benefits Sassafras tea gets many active constituents from either the root or the leaves of the sassafras tree. Some of them include safrole, tannins, mucilage, asarone, and alpha-pinene. This leads to the tea having many health benefits. Sassafras tea works both as a blood thinner and as a blood purifier. Drinking it also promotes the process of extracting toxins from your body. Drinking sassafras tea can help if you’ve got a cold or the flu. Also, it can be used in the treatment for bronchitis and gonorrhea. With sassafras tea, you can also treat liver and kidney problems, urinary tract problems, arthritis and rheumatism. Drinking it will also help reduce menstrual cramps. Sassafras Tea Side Effects Among its active constituents, sassafras tea contains saffron, which is considered to trigger liver cancer. More researches are being done, though until it is known for sure, its trade has been restricted. This is why it is recommended that you not drink sassafras tea for a long period of time. The amount of tea you drink matters, as well. Don’t drink more than 3-4 cups of sassafras tea a day. If you drink too much, you might get hallucinations, heart palpitations, headaches, or you might feel nauseous. Pregnant and breastfeeding women shouldn’t drink sassafras tea, either. It can affect the baby, and even lead to miscarriages during pregnancy. Sassafras tea has both health benefits and side effects. Before you start consuming it, it’s considered best to talk to your doctor and balance the pros and cons, based on your health. If you’re safe to drink it, then enjoy your cup of sassafras tea!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

There are various medications which can help with the detoxifying process, though many varieties of tea promote this process, as well. Find out more about teas for detox! About the detoxification process Many people relate detoxification with consumption of drugs and alcohol. While this is true, detoxification isn’t strictly related to this. Detoxification is a process which our body undergoes when it gets rid of various toxic substances. One of the organs responsible for the detoxification process is the liver. While in some cases it might be necessary, you need to be careful when taking the decision to undergo a detoxifying process. Doctors recommend that people with various health conditions - anemia, diabetes, or kidney disease, for example, should not undergo a detoxification process. The same applies to pregnant and nursing women. Tea can prove to be useful during the detoxifying process. As it is a natural beverage, it is also good for your health, bringing along many health benefits, too. This applies with teas for detox, as well. Types of tea for detox Ginger tea and chamomile tea are often recommended when undergoing a detoxifying process. Also, they both have calming effects, which will help you go through with this process. Milk thistle tea is also good when you’re going through a detoxifying process. It is good for the liver, which helps promote detoxification. Other teas for detox include burdock tea, dandelion tea, nettle tea, rosehip tea, lemongrass tea and lemon balm tea. Many of these also promote a proper digestion, help you treat colds or the flu, and can help with various health problems. Side effects of tea for detox While these teas help with the detoxifying process, you have to be careful with their side effects. Milk thistle tea and nettle tea, for example, can act as a laxative if they are drunk for long periods of time. Meanwhile, dandelion tea should not be consumed by persons suffering from diabetes, or those who have low blood sugar levels. Side effects vary from one tea to another. Make sure you discuss with your doctor about the tea for detox you decide on. When undergoing a detoxification process, choose to drink tea that can help you. As a natural beverage, it will promote detoxification, as well as help you stay healthy. Make sure you try some teas for detox!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Women need to be careful both with what they eat and drink during pregnancy. Even if tea is generally recommended as an everyday beverage, most teas shouldn’t be drunk during pregnancy. Find out which teas you should and shouldn’t drink when you’re pregnant. Careful with teas for pregnancy There are various reasons why pregnant women should be careful with the type of tea they drink. Many are related to the caffeine content some tea varieties might have. Drinking tea with caffeine content might lead to birth defects or even unwanted miscarriages. Also, other tea varieties can lead to uterine contractions, or have properties that involve regulating menstruation. These can also lead to miscarriages. That doesn’t mean that, during pregnancy, women should completely stay away from teas. They just have to know what type of tea they can drink. Teas you can drink for pregnancy Rooibos tea is often recommended to pregnant women, as it doesn’t contain caffeine at all. It contains antioxidants, as well as a low level of tannins. Thanks to this, they are less likely to interfere with iron absorption and, therefore, cause anemia during and after pregnancy. It also helps with indigestion and may relieve nausea. Pregnant women can drink ginger tea or mint tea, which help with morning sickness, or chamomile tea to prevent insomnia. Also, nettle tea can be drunk during the second and third trimester of the pregnancy (not the first) only if it’s made from nettle leaves and not from the root. Raspberry leaf tea has many benefits related to pregnancy. First of all, if a woman wants to get pregnant, this tea will increase fertility, as well as strengthen the uterine wall and relax the muscle in the uterus. During pregnancy, it helps with leg cramps, morning sickness and diarrhea. Also, drinking this tea may lead to less artificial ruptures in the membranes, which lowers the chances of needing a caesarean delivery, as well as needing forceps or vacuum birth. Teas you shouldn’t drink for pregnancy Even if teas are usually considered to be good for our health, this isn’t the case. Women should be careful not to drink various types of tea for pregnancy. It is considered best for pregnant women not to drink teas that contain caffeine. Teas made from the Camellia sinensis plant (green tea, black tea, white tea, oolong tea) contain caffeine, so it is best to avoid them. Small amounts may be acceptable, however it can still be risky, as they might still lead to birth defects or miscarriages. Pregnant women should also be careful with herbal teas. The varieties they shouldn’t drink include devil’s claw, ephedra, fenugreek, gentian, ginseng, hawthorne, motherwort, red raspberry leaf, senna, shepherd’s purse, St. John’s wort, or yarrow. Teas for labor Partridge tea is recommended for pregnant women who are due to give birth. It is recommended to be drunk during the last 2-3 weeks of pregnancy. Partridge tea helps with relieving congestions of the uterus and ovaries. It can also be used as an antiseptic to treat vaginal infections. Plus, when it is combined with raspberry leaves, it can help even more during the last two weeks of pregnancy. Pregnant women should be careful even when it comes to the type of tea they drink. Some might be harmful, while others may help them a lot both during and after pregnancy. If you want to get pregnant, make sure you remember the accepted teas for pregnancy.... Beneficial Teas

Medicinal Plants Glossary

A rare disorder in which convulsions occur during late pregnancy (see also PREGNANCY AND LABOUR – Increased blood pressure). This condition occurs in around 50 out of every 100,000 pregnant women, especially in the later months and at the time of delivery, but in a few cases only after delivery has taken place. The cause is not known, although cerebral OEDEMA is thought to occur. In practically all cases the KIDNEYS are profoundly a?ected. E?ective antenatal care should identify most women at risk of developing eclampsia.

Symptoms Warning symptoms include dizziness, headache, oedema, vomiting, and the secretion of albumin (protein) in the urine. These are normally accompanied by a rise in blood pressure, which can be severe. Preeclamptic symptoms may be present for some days or weeks before the seizure takes place, and, if a woman is found to have these during antenatal care, preventive measures must be taken. Untreated, CONVULSIONS and unconsciousness are very likely, with serious migraine-like frontal headache and epigastric pain the symptoms.

Treatment Prevention of eclampsia by dealing with pre-eclamptic symptoms is the best management, but even this may not prevent convulsions. Hospital treatment is essential if eclampsia develops, preferably in a specialist unit. The treatment of the seizures is that generally applicable to convulsions of any kind, with appropriate sedatives given such as intravenous DIAZEPAM. HYDRALLAZINE intravenously should also be administered to reduce the blood pressure. Magnesium sulphate given intramuscularly sometimes helps to control the ?ts. The baby’s condition should be monitored throughout.

Urgent delivery of the baby, if necessary by CAESAREAN SECTION, is the most e?ective ‘treatment’ for a mother with acute eclampsia. (See PREGNANCY AND LABOUR.)

Women who have su?ered from eclampsia are liable to su?er a recurrence in a further preganancy. Careful monitoring is required. There is a self-help organisation, Action on Pre-eclampsia (APEC), to advise on the condition.... Medicinal Plants Glossary

Medical Dictionary

An ectopic pregnancy most commonly develops in one of the FALLOPIAN TUBES. Occasionally it may occur in one of the OVARIES, and rarely in the uterine cervix or the abdominal cavity. Around one in 200 pregnant women have an ectopic gestation. As pregnancy proceeds, surrounding tissues may be damaged and, if serious bleeding happens, the woman may present as an ‘abdominal emergency’. A life-threatening condition, this needs urgent surgery. Most women recover satisfactorily and can have further pregnancies despite the removal of one Fallopian tube as a result of the ectopic gestation. Death is unusual. This disorder of pregnancy may occur because infection or a previous abdominal injury or operation may have damaged the normal descent of an ovum from the ovary to the womb. The ?rst symptoms usually appear during the ?rst two months of pregnancy, perhaps before the woman realises she is pregnant. Severe lower abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding are common presenting symptoms. Ultrasound can be used to diagnose the condition and laparoscopy can be used to remove the products of conception. (See PREGNANCY AND LABOUR.)... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

A drug known as a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, used in the treatment of HIV infection in combination with other antiretroviral drugs (see VIRUSES; AIDS/HIV). It should not be used in patients with severe kidney impairment or liver damage. Pregnant women and older people should not take efavirenz. The drug has a wide range of side-e?ects.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Elderberry tea is commonly known as a remedy for flu or cold. This miraculous shrub has many other benefits for your health and can be used in many forms even for wines or sweets. About Elderberry tea Originally native to Europe and Western Africa, elderberry is a bush with white flowers and clusters of berries that are purplish to black in color. The best type of elderberry is considered to be the sambucus nigra, because it is truly the only safe type. Other types can be poisonous (especially stems and leaves) so be careful when you pick it yourself or when you buy it from stores. The elderberry flowers and fruits are usually used to prepare teas, wine, jams, pies and syrups and are sometimes used as flavoring for soft drinks. The elderberry plant is also sometimes used as an ornamental plant. Elderberry tea is rich in vitamin C and has high levels of flavonoids, anthocyanin, sambucin, sambunigrin and potassium nitrate, along with sugars. Only dried white flowers are used to prepare the tea which has a delicate tasty flavor. How to prepare Elderberry tea For a delicious cup of Elderberry tea, take 3 teaspoons of dried flowers and combine them with a cup of boiling water. Let them steep for approximately 10 minutes. Cool, strain and enjoy it afterwards. The same procedure must be followed if you use teabags, but use only 1. Drink it up to three times a day to treat flu or other respiratory conditions. If you add honey, its benefits will be doubled. Benefits of Elderberry tea Elderberry tea has lots of benefits especially when it comes to flu or fever. It helps relieving respiratory conditions caused by a buildup of mucus or phlegm, such as colds, bronchitis, and asthma problems. It clears the system out, lowers fever and eases flu symptoms. Elderberry tea also acts as an antioxidant protecting the body against aging free radicals thanks to the flavonoids contained. It has also a detoxifying effect helping the liver and kidneys to process and remove toxins from the body. Elderberry tea may help in the treatment of various types of allergies. Elderberry tea may be helpful in the quick recovery of patients with eruptive diseases caused by viruses like measles and chicken pox. It is also recommended in the treatment of arthritic and rheumatic pain. Side effects of Elderberry tea Although Elderberry tea is considered generally safe, it can occasionally generate  some side effects like gastrointestinal upset. Please keep in mind that it is always a good idea to ask your physician’s opinion before taking this tea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. As you can see, Elderberry tea has many benefits for your health and as long as you have chosen the right type and you do not exceed 3 cups a day you can drink it with no worries.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Celandine tea is one of the many herbal teas available all around the world. While it has a bitter taste, it is still a valuable beverage thanks to its many health benefits. Find out more about celandine tea! About Celandine Tea Celandine tea is made from the plant called greater celandine, also known as tetterwort in Europe. It is an herbaceous perennial plant which can be found in Europe, western Asia and North America. The greater celandine has an erect stem with a height between 30 and 120cm. The leaves are quite long (around 30cm), lobed and crenate. The flowers are yellow, with four petals and two sepals; they bloom from late spring till the end of summer. The plant also has a pod-like fruit with an unpleasant odor and a bitter taste. How to prepare Celandine Tea For a cup of celandine tea, add half a teaspoon of chopped celandine herbs to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for about 10 minutes. Once the steeping time is done, strain to remove the herbs and the tea is done. If you think the taste is too bitter for your liking, you can add honey or fruit juice (lemon, for example). Celandine Tea Benefits Celandine tea gets many active constituents from the greater celandine. Some of them include berberine, sanguinarine, chelidonine, protopine, coptisine, and stylopine. Celandine tea, especially in combination with other herbs, is quite beneficial for your stomach. It can be combined with peppermint leaf, German chamomile, caraway, licorice, clown’s mustard plant, lemon balm, angelica, and milk thistle. The mixture helps with dyspepsia, as it reduces the severity of acid reflux, stomach pains, cramping, nausea, and vomiting. You can drink celandine tea if you’ve got problems with gallstones. It increases bile production and therefore flushes out gallstones. It also helps with jaundice, scurvy, and gout. Celandine tea can also help if you’ve got a toothache or high blood pressure. It is often used to treat whooping cough, bronchitis, and arthritis. Also, if you’ve got an irregular menstruation, celandine tea can help regulate it. Celandine tea can also be used topically. It is useful when it comes to various skin problems, for example warts, blister rashes or scabies. Celandine Tea Side Effects Celandine tea has a few side effects, as well. It is recommended not to drink celandine tea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. It isn’t known just how much harm it can do, but it might affect the baby. Therefore, it is safer not to consume it during these periods. Celandine tea might increase the flow of bile. In some cases, if a large quantity is consumed, it might cause blockage of the bile duct. Also, you shouldn’t drink celandine tea if you know you’ve got liver problems. In some cases, it might cause hepatitis. Be careful with the amount of celandine tea you drink, as well. It is recommended not to drink more than six cups of celandine tea a day. If you do, it might cause more harm than good. Some of the symptoms you might get include: headaches, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, and irregular heartbeats.   Celandine tea is recommended as an everyday tea. It has important health benefits and very few side effects. Despite its bitter taste, give it a try!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you like herbal teas, there are lots of types you can try - one of them is periwinkle tea. Like most herbal teas, it has a slightly bitter taste, but it also has important health benefits. Read to find out more about periwinkle tea! About Periwinkle Tea Periwinkle tea is made from the vinca plant, an herbaceous plant which can be found in Europe, northwest Africa and southwest Asia. Vinca plant has long, trailing stems that grow near the ground, touching it. The branches can reach about half a meter in height. The leaves are evergreen and, opposite, the flowers are salverform, with 5 vilet (and sometimes white) petals connected together at the base. Two species of the plant are often cultivated as ornamental plants. However, in some parts of Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, it has spread too much, becoming an invasive plant. Interestingly, it is said that the plant protects you from voodoo magic. Periwinkle Tea constituents Vinca plants have lots of constituents which are transferred to periwinkle tea, as well. Periwinkle tea is rich in alkaloids that come from the vinca plant. It has at least 86 different alkaloids. Some of them are: vincamine, vinpocetine, vinblastine, vincristine, alstonine, ajmalicine, leurocristine, and reserpine. How to prepare Periwinkle Tea For a cup of periwinkle tea, you need a teaspoon of dried herbs. Pour boiling water into the cup and let it steep for 10-15 minutes. Once the steeping time is done, strain to remove the herbs and your cup of periwinkle tea is done. If the taste is too bitter for you, you can sweeten the tea by adding honey or fruit juice to your cup. Periwinkle Tea Benefits Thanks to the many constituents derived from the vinca plant, periwinkle tea has lots of important health benefits. Periwinkle tea plays an important role in the fight against cancer. It is often recommended in the treatment for leukemia, Hodgkin’s disease, malignant lymphomas, neuroblastoma, Wilm’s tumor and Kaposi’s sarcoma. Drinking periwinkle tea will help lower blood sugar levels and blood pressure, as well as improve blood circulation. You can drink periwinkle tea during menstruation if you’ve got an excessive blood flow. It should help in such situations. This tea is also useful in treating diarrhea, colitis and diabetes. You can use periwinkle tea to treat mouth sores and bleeding gums; it acts as a good mouth rinse. It can help you with headaches and memory loss problems and it enhances your memory. It also has calming effects, helping you with anxiety and nervousness. Periwinkle tea can be used topically, as well. You can wet a cloth with tea and use it to stop wounds from bleeding. You can also put it on the skin to treat wasp stings or on the eye if you’ve got an eye infection. Periwinkle Tea Side Effects With so many health benefits, periwinkle tea has to have a few side effects too. Here are some which you have to be careful with. If you’ve got kidney, liver or lung diseases, you should avoid drinking periwinkle tea. Also you should not drink it if you’ve got low blood pressure, or if you’re constipated. Pregnant women shouldn’t drinkperiwinkle tea, as it may lead to birth defects or even miscarriages. Also, it is best to stay away from this tea if you’re breast feeding; even in this case, it might affect the baby. It is best to stop drinking periwinkle tea before a surgery. It can lower blood pressure and it might lead to problems during and after the surgery. Check with your doctor and make sure you’re safe to drink periwinkle tea after a surgery. It is also recommended that you not drink more than 4 cups of periwinkle tea. Besides the usual symptoms (low blood pressure and constipation) you might also get other symptoms: headaches, loss of appetite, insomnia, dizziness, and irregular heartbeats. Drinking periwinkle tea can help you a lot, with its many health benefits. Don’t forget about the side effects, though. As long as you make sure it’s safe to drink periwinkle tea, you can happily drink it!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you feel like drinking an herbal tea with plenty of health benefits, you should try prickly ash tea. Even if the taste is bitter, the tea is bound to help you stay healthy. Find out more about it in this article! About Prickly Ash Tea Prickly ash tea is made from the bark of the prickly ash. The plant is also known as Devil’s Walkingstick, Hercules’s Club or Prickly Elder. The plant grows in the eastern parts of North America. Prickly ash is a tall shrub, usually reaching 6m in height. It has a stem with large leaves, 70-120cm long. The flowers bloom in late summer; they’re small and creamy-white. Also, the fruits are a small, purple-black berry. How to make Prickly Ash Tea It’s easy to make prickly ash tea. Boil the necessary amount of water and add a teaspoon of chopped bark for each cup of tea. Let it steep for 5-7 minutes; then, strain in order to remove the herbs. If it tastes too bitter for you, you can sweeten the tea with milk, honey or fruit juices. Prickly Ash Tea Benefits Prickly ash tea gets important active constituents from the bark of its plant. These include chelerythin alkaloids, tannins, lignans, resins, and volatile oils. You can drink prickly ash tea if you’ve got toothaches, abdominal pains (or any other chronic pains) or diarrhea. It is also used in killing intestinal parasites, and treating arthritis and rheumatism. It is also useful in treating circulation problems and lowering blood pressure. You can drink it if you’ve got a cold or a sore throat. Prickly ash tea can also be combined with other ingredients, for different health benefits. Combined with ginger, it alleviates chronic abdominal pains, and treats nausea and vomiting caused by long-term illnesses. It can also be combined with coptis or Oregon grape root in order to treat symptoms caused by roundworms. Prickly Ash Tea side Effects It is best not to drink prickly ash tea if you’re pregnant or breast feeding. It’s not quite sure how it can affect the baby, but it might, so it’s better to stop drinking it during these periods. Be careful with the amount of tea you drink if you’ve got low blood pressure. Prickly ash tea helps lower the blood pressure, so it might end up causing some harm (hypotension). Also, if you drink this tea while taking medication (aspirin, warfarin, heparin, tinzaparin), the combination might lead to bleeding and bruising. Also, don’t drink prickly ash tea if you’ve got stomach or intestinal problems: ulcerative colitis, peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, infections, and other digestive tract conditions. It’s bound to make your stomach and intestinal problems worse. Also, dopn’t drink this tea if you’ve got a fever with profuse sweating. Despite its bitter taste, you should give prickly ash tea a chance, especially thanks to its health benefits. As an herbal tea, it’s bound to keep you healthy!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Did you know that eucalyptus leaves are the favourite food of koala bears? Having a pungent scent and antimicrobial properties, eucalyptus is a well known remedy for sinusitis and other respiratory ailments. It is also used successfully in aromatherapy. About Eucalyptus Tea Eucalyptus is one of the quickest growing tree species on the planet and it is derived from the grayish-green, leathery leaves of the tree botanically known as Eucalyptus globulus, also called the “blue gum tree” or “Australian fever tree.” Native to Tasmania, the eucalyptus tree grows in subtropical zones worldwide. The leaves contain eucalyptol, as well as tannins, caffeic and gallic acids, also found in green tea, along with flavonoids and antioxidants. Eucalyptus is antiseptic, antiviral, antifungal and antispasmodic with expectorant and decongestant properties. Eucalyptus is primarily valuable for its leaves, which are used to make an essential oil, eucalyptus tea and compresses. If you want to enhance the scent of the leaves, due to the aromatic oils that are contained inside, all you have to do is break or crush them, and then this will be released. You can prepare eucalyptus tea either using dry or fresh leaves. However, Eucalyptus tea made of dried eucalyptus leaves has lost most of its healing power. Instead, it’s best to cut small branches with a few dozen fresh leaves and keep them in a vase with water to prevent drying. How to make Eucalyptus Tea To make eucalyptus tea, pour 1 cup of boiled water over up to 1/2 teaspoon of the dried eucalyptus leaves. Cover and steep for 10 minutes, then strain. You can sweeten with honey and drink up to 2 - 3 cups a day. If you want to use fresh leaves, take a single one, chop it, add hot water and let it steep for about 4-6 minutes - then add honey or brown sugar. The bits of leaf should then be strained and discarded. Take care not to ingest the eucalyptus oil directly, as it is extremely strong and somewhat volatile. Then drink in small sips while hot. Benefits of Eucalyptus Tea Some studies pointed out that drinking eucalyptus tea may help increase insulin production and lower blood sugar level. You can gargle this tea when you have throat infections, or use it as a mouthwash as its antiseptic and antibacterial properties fight bad breath. Eucalyptus tea, when rubbed in the chest area, may relieve bronchitis, asthma and colds. When inhaled, the steam from the eucalyptus tea can help alleviate chest infections and a host of respiratory and pulmonary ailments like colds, emphysema, whooping cough and asthma. Applied topically, the tea may produce healthier looking skin. A compress with eucalyptus tea is effective in treating painful joints, minor burns and sore muscles. Side effects of Eucalyptus Tea Side effects from eucalyptus tea are rare; nausea, vomiting and diarrhea have been reported. Consult your doctor before using eucalyptus tea. If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, if you have inflammation of the kidneys or that of the gastrointestinal tract, bile duct disease, liver disease or low or high blood pressure, don’t drink eucalyptus tea. Eucalyptus is a tree with many benefits and uses. Eucalyptus tea can easily be included in a healthy life style, especially when it is used to treat certain ailments.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Most of the people have already used it for cooking, but now it is time to consider drinking fennel as a tea. In ancient times it was believed that this herb had mysterious vitalistic properties. About fennel tea Also known as Foeniculum vulgare, fennelis a perennial, edible herb, green and crunchy like celery, with feathery leaves and small yellow flowers. It ressembles to dill as well. Its bulb is white or pale green with closely superimposed stalks. Originated from the Mediterranean regions now it grows almost everywhere. It is rich in vitamins A, B-complex, C and D, antioxidants and it is a great source of amino acids, fatty acids, calcium, iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, sodium, sulfur and zinc. Generally, the seeds are used to make fennel tea but some might use the leaves as well. How to make Fennel tea A cup of fennel tea will offer you a world of benefits due to its healthy constituents. For a tasty tea, take one teaspoon of fennel seeds and pour one cup of boiled water. Let the tea steep for about 10 minutes allowing the water to extract the oil from the seeds and then use another cup to drain the tea. Benefits of Fennel tea There is a wide range of health benefits for drinking fennel tea. Find out below some of the most important ones. Fennel tea stimulates milk production (lactation) and has the same impact on the body as estrogen. It also improves the hormone balance and alleviates symptoms of PMS and menopause. Fennel tea has been shown to be diuretic, bile-producing, pain-reducing, fever-reducing and an antimicrobial fighter. The seeds and the tea can help with digestive problems by relaxing the smooth muscles of the intestine and it is often used by people to alleviate bloating, constipation, heartburn, indigestion, and gas. Fennel tea is effective at reducing the symptoms of cold and flu, soothing sore throats, clearing up congestions in the chest and expelling excess phlegm. It is believed to improve the eyesight. Side effects of Fennel tea A part from the many benefits that it has, fennel tea also has some precautions that are better to be taken into consideration. The consumption of fennel in excessive quantities is not indicated because it can lead to muscular convulsions and even hallucinations. Pregnant women should avoid drinking fennel tea because it can act as an uterine stimulant. Do not apply fennel directly to your skin because it can irritate it. Fennel tea is mostly safe for regular consumption as long as you do not drink more than 3 cups a day. Do not ignore its precautions if you want to have a healthy experience.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

Inspection of a FETUS by passing a ?breoptic instrument called a fetoscope through the abdominal wall of a pregnant woman into her UTERUS. The procedure is usually conducted in the 18th to 20th week of pregnancy to assess the fetus for abnormalities and to take blood samples to preclude diseases such as HAEMOPHILIA, DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY and sickle-cell ANAEMIA. The procedure should be used only if there is a serious possibility of abnormality, the presence of which will usually have been indicated by other screening tests such as ULTRASOUND and tests of blood obtained by (intrauterine) cordocentesis (withdrawal of blood by syringe inserted into the umbilical cord).... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Mostly known as a cleansing herb, figwort tea was used in the past to treat tuberculosis. Some of the benefits of figwort tea are the detoxifying properties and the capacity to treat skin conditions. About Figworth tea Botanically called Scrophularia nodosa, figwort is also known as carpenter’s square, knotted figwort, throatwort or rose noble. Figwort is a perennial plant with thick square fleshy stems and green or purple flowers, commonly found in the cooler woodlands of Europe, North America and Central Asia. It is harvested in the summer when it is in bloom. It was used in the past to treat tuberculosis commonly called scrofula. It is commonly known as a powerful diuretic and a detoxifier. In China it is associated with salt and taken as a yin tonic. Figwort is typically prepared as a tea infusion, a tincture or as a compress. Figwort tea is prepared from the aerial parts and the roots. Figwort tea contains saponins, cardioactive, glycosides, flavonoids, resin, sugar and organic acids. Ho to prepare figwort tea To make figwort tea, use two teaspoons of dried figwort herbs in a cup of boiling water. Take it out of the heat, and let the mix infuse for about 10 - 15 minutes. It is recommended to be taken not more than twice a day. Benefits of figwort tea Figwort tea is used externally to treat skin conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis. It may also help heal wounds, ulcers, burns, and hemorrhoids. In homeopathic medicine, figwort tea is used to treat decreased resistance, tonsillitis, and lymph edema. It is used internally for its mild laxative effect and its mild diuretic and heart strengthening properties. Figwort tea may stimulate the lymphatic system. Some people believe that figwort Tea may have anti tumor properties. Side effects of figwort tea Pregnant and breastfeeding women should also avoid use, as well as those with cardiac conditions or diabetes, as it might create cardiac disturbances or slow the heart beatings or interfere with some medication. Figwort tea is mainly considered safe for regular consumption but do not ignore it’s precautions before deciding to drink it regularly.... Beneficial Teas

A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

See also Shellfish, Squid. Nutritional Profile Energy value (calories per serving): Moderate Protein: High Fat: Low to moderate Saturated fat: Low to moderate Cholesterol: Moderate Carbohydrates: Low Fiber: None Sodium: Low (fresh fish) High (some canned or salted fish) Major vitamin contribution: Vitamin A, vitamin D Major mineral contribution: Iodine, selenium, phosphorus, potassium, iron, calcium About the Nutrients in This Food Like meat, poultry, milk, and eggs, fish are an excellent source of high- quality proteins with sufficient amount of all the essential amino acids. While some fish have as much or more fat per serving than some meats, the fat content of fish is always lower in saturated fat and higher in unsaturated fats. For example, 100 g/3.5 ounce cooked pink salmon (a fatty fish) has 4.4 g total fat, but only 0.7 g saturated fat, 1.2 g monounsaturated fat, and 1.7 g polyunsaturated fat; 100 g/3.5 ounce lean top sirloin has four grams fat but twice as much saturated fat (1.5 g), plus 1.6 g monounsatu- rated fat and only 0.2 g polyunsaturated fat. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Content of Various Fish (Continued) Fish  Grams/ounce Rainbow trout  0.30 Lake whitefish  0.25 Source: “Food for t he Heart,” American Health, April 1985. Fish oils are one of the few natural food sources of vitamin D. Salmon also has vita- min A derived from carotenoid pigments in the plants eaten by the fish. The soft bones in some canned salmon and sardines are an excellent source of calcium. CAUTION: do not eat the bones in r aw or cook ed fish. the only bones consider ed edible ar e those in the canned products. The Most Nutritious Way to Serve This Food Cooked, to kill parasites and potentially pathological microorganisms living in raw fish. Broiled, to liquify fat and eliminate the fat-soluble environmental contaminants found in some freshwater fish. With the soft, mashed, calcium-rich bones (in canned salmon and canned sardines). Diets That May Restrict or Exclude This Food Low-purine (antigout) diet Low-sodium diet (canned, salted, or smoked fish) Buying This Food Look for: Fresh-smelling whole fish with shiny skin; reddish pink, moist gills; and clear, bulging eyes. The flesh should spring back when you press it lightly. Choose fish fillets that look moist, not dry. Choose tightly sealed, solidly frozen packages of frozen fish. In 1998, the FDA /National Center for Toxicological Research released for testing an inexpensive indicator called “Fresh Tag.” The indicator, to be packed with seafood, changes color if the product spoils. Avoid: Fresh whole fish whose eyes have sunk into the head (a clear sign of aging); fillets that look dry; and packages of frozen fish that are stained (whatever leaked on the package may have seeped through onto the fish) or are coated with ice crystals (the package may have defrosted and been refrozen). Storing This Food Remove fish from plastic wrap as soon as you get it home. Plastic keeps out air, encouraging the growth of bacteria that make the fish smell bad. If the fish smells bad when you open the package, throw it out. Refrigerate all fresh and smoked fish immediately. Fish spoils quickly because it has a high proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (which pick up oxygen much more easily than saturated or monounsaturated fatty acids). Refrigeration also slows the action of microorgan- isms on the surface of the fish that convert proteins and other substances to mucopolysac- charides, leaving a slimy film on the fish. Keep fish frozen until you are ready to use it. Store canned fish in a cool cabinet or in a refrigerator (but not the freezer). The cooler the temperature, the longer the shelf life. Preparing This Food Fresh fish. Rub the fish with lemon juice, then rinse it under cold running water. The lemon juice (an acid) will convert the nitrogen compounds that make fish smell “fishy” to compounds that break apart easily and can be rinsed off the fish with cool running water. R insing your hands in lemon juice and water will get rid of the fishy smell after you have been preparing fresh fish. Frozen fish. Defrost plain frozen fish in the refrigerator or under cold running water. Pre- pared frozen fish dishes should not be thawed before you cook them since defrosting will make the sauce or coating soggy. Salted dried fish. Salted dried fish should be soaked to remove the salt. How long you have to soak the fish depends on how much salt was added in processing. A reasonable average for salt cod, mackerel, haddock (finnan haddie), or herring is three to six hours, with two or three changes of water. When you are done, clean all utensils thoroughly with hot soap and hot water. Wash your cutting board, wood or plastic, with hot water, soap, and a bleach-and-water solution. For ultimate safety in preventing the transfer of microorganisms from the raw fish to other foods, keep one cutting board exclusively for raw fish, meats, and poultry, and a second one for everything else. Finally, don’t forget to wash your hands. What Happens When You Cook This Food Heat changes the structure of proteins. It denatures the protein molecules so that they break apart into smaller fragments or change shape or clump together. These changes force moisture out of the tissues so that the fish turns opaque. The longer you cook fish, the more moisture it will lose. Cooked fish flakes because the connective tissue in fish “melts” at a relatively low temperature. Heating fish thoroughly destroys parasites and microorganisms that live in raw fish, making the fish safer to eat. How Other Kinds of Processing Affect This Food Marinating. Like heat, acids coagulate the proteins in fish, squeezing out moisture. Fish marinated in citrus juices and other acids such as vinegar or wine has a firm texture and looks cooked, but the acid bath may not inactivate parasites in the fish. Canning. Fish is naturally low in sodium, but can ned fish often contains enough added salt to make it a high-sodium food. A 3.5-ounce ser ving of baked, fresh red salmon, for example, has 55 mg sodium, while an equal ser ving of regular can ned salmon has 443 mg. If the fish is can ned in oil it is also much higher in calories than fresh fish. Freezing. When fish is frozen, ice cr ystals form in the flesh and tear its cells so that mois- ture leaks out when the fish is defrosted. Commercial flash-freezing offers some protec- tion by freezing the fish so fast that the ice cr ystals stay small and do less damage, but all defrosted fish tastes drier and less palatable than fresh fish. Freezing slows but does not stop the oxidation of fats that causes fish to deteriorate. Curing. Fish can be cured (preser ved) by smoking, dr ying, salting, or pickling, all of which coagulate the muscle tissue and prevent microorganisms from growing. Each method has its own particular drawbacks. Smoking adds potentially carcinogenic chemicals. Dr ying reduces the water content, concentrates the solids and nutrients, increases the calories per ounce, and raises the amount of sodium. Medical Uses and/or Benefits Protection against cardiovascular disease. The most important fats in fish are the poly- unsaturated acids k nown as omega-3s. These fatt y acids appear to work their way into heart cells where they seem to help stabilize the heart muscle and prevent potentially fatal arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat). A mong 85,000 women in the long-run n ing Nurses’ Health Study, those who ate fatt y fish at least five times a week were nearly 50 percent less likely to die from heart disease than those who ate fish less frequently. Similar results appeared in men in the equally long-run n ing Physicians’ Health Study. Some studies suggest that people may get similar benefits from omega-3 capsules. Researchers at the Consorzio Mario Negri Sud in Santa Maria Imbaro ( Italy) say that men given a one-gram fish oil capsule once a day have a risk of sudden death 42 percent lower than men given placebos ( “look-alike” pills with no fish oil). However, most nutrition scientists recom- mend food over supplements. Omega-3 Content of Various Food Fish Fish* (3 oz.)  Omega-3 (grams) Salmon, Atlantic  1.8 Anchovy, canned* 1.7 Mackerel, Pacific 1.6 Salmon, pink, canned* 1.4 Sardine, Pacific, canned* 1.4 Trout, rainbow  1.0 Tuna, white, canned* 0.7 Mussels  0.7 * cooked, wit hout sauce * drained Source: Nat ional Fisheries Inst itute; USDA Nut rient Data Laborator y. Nat ional Nut ri- ent Database for Standard Reference. Available online. UR L : http://w w w.nal.usda. gov/fnic/foodcomp/search /. Adverse Effects Associated with This Food Allergic reaction. According to the Merck Manual, fish is one of the 12 foods most likely to trigger classic food allergy symptoms: hives, swelling of the lips and eyes, and upset stom- ach. The others are berries (blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries), chocolate, corn, eggs, legumes (green peas, lima beans, peanuts, soybeans), milk, nuts, peaches, pork, shellfish, and wheat (see wheat cer ea ls). NOTE : Canned tuna products may contain sulfites in vegetable proteins used to enhance the tuna’s flavor. People sensitive to sulfites may suf- fer serious allergic reactions, including potentially fatal anaphylactic shock, if they eat tuna containing sulfites. In 1997, tuna manufacturers agreed to put warning labels on products with sulfites. Environmental contaminants. Some fish are contaminated with methylmercury, a compound produced by bacteria that chemically alters naturally occurring mercury (a metal found in rock and soil) or mercury released into water through industrial pollution. The methylmer- cury is absorbed by small fish, which are eaten by larger fish, which are then eaten by human beings. The larger the fish and the longer it lives the more methylmercury it absorbs. The measurement used to describe the amount of methylmercury in fish is ppm (parts per mil- lion). Newly-popular tilapia, a small fish, has an average 0.01 ppm, while shark, a big fish, may have up to 4.54 ppm, 450 times as much. That is a relatively small amount of methylmercur y; it will soon make its way harmlessly out of the body. But even small amounts may be hazardous during pregnancy because methylmercur y targets the developing fetal ner vous system. Repeated studies have shown that women who eat lots of high-mercur y fish while pregnant are more likely to deliver babies with developmental problems. As a result, the FDA and the Environ men- tal Protection Agency have now warned that women who may become pregnant, who are pregnant, or who are nursing should avoid shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish, the fish most likely to contain large amounts of methylmercur y. The same prohibition applies to ver y young children; although there are no studies of newborns and babies, the young brain continues to develop after birth and the logic is that the prohibition during pregnancy should extend into early life. That does not mean no fish at all should be eaten during pregnancy. In fact, a 2003 report in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health of data from an 11,585-woman study at the University of Bristol (England) shows that women who don’t eat any fish while pregnant are nearly 40 percent more likely to deliver low birth-weight infants than are women who eat about an ounce of fish a day, the equivalent of 1/3 of a small can of tuna. One theory is that omega-3 fatty acids in the fish may increase the flow of nutrient-rich blood through the placenta to the fetus. University of Southern California researchers say that omega-3s may also protect some children from asthma. Their study found that children born to asthmatic mothers who ate oily fish such as salmon at least once a month while pregnant were less likely to develop asthma before age five than children whose asthmatic pregnant mothers never ate oily fish. The following table lists the estimated levels of mercury in common food fish. For the complete list of mercury levels in fish, click onto www.cfsan.fda.gov/~frf/sea-mehg.html. Mercury Levels in Common Food Fish Low levels (0.01– 0.12 ppm* average) Anchovies, butterfish, catfish, clams, cod, crab (blue, king, snow), crawfish, croaker (Atlantic), flounder, haddock, hake, herring, lobster (spiny/Atlantic) mackerel, mul- let, ocean perch, oysters, pollock, salmon (canned/fresh frozen), sardines, scallops, shad (American), shrimp, sole, squid, tilapia, trout (freshwater), tuna (canned, light), whitefish, whiting Mid levels (0.14 – 0.54 ppm* average) Bass (salt water), bluefish, carp, croaker ( Pacific), freshwater perch, grouper, halibut, lobster (Northern A merican), mackerel (Spanish), marlin, monkfish, orange roughy, skate, snapper, tilefish (Atlantic), tuna (can ned albacore, fresh/frozen), weakfish/ sea trout High levels (0.73 –1.45 ppm* average) King mackerel, shark, swordfish, tilefish * ppm = parts per million, i.e. parts of mercur y to 1,000,000 parts fish Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administ rat ion, Center for Food Safet y and Applied Nut rit ion, “Mercur y Levels in Commercial Fish and Shellfish.” Available online. UR L : w w w.cfsan.fda. gov/~frf/sea-mehg.ht ml. Parasitical, viral, and bacterial infections. Like raw meat, raw fish may carry various pathogens, including fish tapeworm and flukes in freshwater fish and Salmonella or other microorganisms left on the fish by infected foodhandlers. Cooking the fish destroys these organisms. Scombroid poisoning. Bacterial decomposition that occurs after fish is caught produces a his- taminelike toxin in the flesh of mackerel, tuna, bonito, and albacore. This toxin may trigger a number of symptoms, including a flushed face immediately after you eat it. The other signs of scombroid poisoning—nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and hives—show up a few minutes later. The symptoms usually last 24 hours or less. Food/Drug Interactions Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are drugs used to treat depression. They inactivate naturally occurring enzymes in your body that metabolize tyramine, a substance found in many fermented or aged foods. Tyramine constricts blood vessels and increases blood pressure. If you eat a food such as pickled herring, which is high in tyramine, while you are taking an M AO inhibitor, your body may not be able to eliminate the tyramine and the result may be a hypertensive crisis.... A Nutritional, Medical and Culinary Guide

Medical Dictionary

One of the constituents of the vitamin B complex, folic acid derives its name from the fact that it is found in many green leaves, including spinach and grass. It has also been obtained from liver, kidney and yeasts. It has proved to be of value in the treatment of macrocytic anaemias (see ANAEMIA), particularly those associated with SPRUE and nutritional de?ciencies.

In order to prevent NEURAL TUBE defects and cleft lip or palate (see CLEFT PALATE), all women planning to become pregnant should be advised to have a diet rich in folic acid in the months before conception until 13 weeks’ gestation, or to take folic acid tablets.

Recent research has suggested that adequate levels of folic acid can prevent the build-up of homocysteine, a compound in the blood closely associated with heart attacks and strokes. It has been suggested that the o?cial recommendation of 200 micrograms a day in the diet should be doubled. (See APPENDIX 5: VITAMINS.)... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

The health benefits of fumitory tea have been well-known since ancient times as it has a “bringer of long life” fame. Fumitory was once used as an herb to stop the hiccups and sometimes even as a tool to expel evil spirits. About Fumitory tea Fumitory is an annual, climbing herb native to Eurasia, Australia and North America. Also known as fumaria officinalis, it has slender stems, triangular leaves, limp branches and pinkish flowers with purple or white tops. Fumitory can be found in various forms like tea infusion, tincture, capsules or extract form. Active components include alkaloids (including fumarine and protopine), bitter principles, tannic acid, fumaric acid, mucilage, flavonoids, resin, potassium. For fumitory tea, the above ground parts of the plant are usually used. Brew Fumitory tea To prepare fumitory tea, simply place 1 to 2 tablespoons of dried fumitory herbs in a cup of boiling water. Let it infuse for about 10 to 15 minutes and then you can add milk or natural sweetener to taste. Fumitory tea benefits Fumitory tea has many health benefits as long as you drink up to 3 cups a day. Fumitory Tea may help in the treatment of skin problems such as eczema and acne. It is diuretic, laxative, sedative and a general tonic. It supports liver and kidney treatment and may help in the fight against gallstones. Fumitory tea is used also to treat cystitis, atherosclerosis, rheumatism, arthritis as well as to purify the blood. Fumitory tea side effects Please keep in mind not to associate fumitory tea with drugs, alcohol or some medicines as it can create unwanted interactions. Also, if you are a pregnant or nursing woman and you are planning to have children, it’s best to keep away from this tea. Safety Risk Side effects associated with fumitory include hypotension, increased intraocular pressure, and acute renal failure. When applied externally through eyewashes, fumitory tea, may help in the treatment of conjunctivitis. Fumitory tea is mostly safe for regular use. However, take into consideration the possible side effects and adjust the consumption according to your needs.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Mostly used as a spice in Thai cuisine, few people know that Galangal herb can also be used for a tasty tea due to its properties. Learn more about its interesting impact on your health. About Galangal tea Galangal (also known as galanga, blue ginger, laos) is an East Asian tropical shrub with lance-like leaves, iris-like flowers, and reddish brown, woody rhizomes, belonging to the ginger family. Widely used in the Asian cuisine, few people know that there are two main types, both called lengkuas or laos : Lesser galangal and Greater galangal also called Galanga or Temulawak. In its raw form, galangals have a stronger taste than common ginger. It can be found as fresh root, dried root or dried, ground powder, tea or tincture. Galangal rhizomes are rich in a complex of compounds such as resins, eugenol, volatile oil, galangol, as well as kaempferid, galangal, alpinin, and carbohydrates. Rhizomes are aromatic and pungent with a ginger-sour-lemon flavor. You can drink galangal tea at any time, during the day. How to brew Galagal tea In order to prepare a tasty tea, it is recommended to use the galangal root, dried or powdered. Infuse 1/2 teaspoon of powdered rhizome in one cup of boiling water, steep 10-15 minutess and drink up to 3 cups a day.  If you choose the root in the first brew, you can reuse it several times afterwards. Galangal tea has an amazing flavor, either sweetened or not. Benefits of Galangal tea Galangal tea is famous for easing digestive problems and in some Asian countries it is considered perfect for physical, mental and spiritual health and it is even believed to have aphrodisiac properties. Although galangal root is a little bitter, galangal tea relieves bloating, constipation, sluggish digestion, and gas. This tea can induce a deeply meditative state as well as powerful vivid dreams. It is even perfectly easy to fall asleep after drinking a cup of galangal tea. Galangal tea has been used for centuries for its tonic properties as it can instantly reduce fever and indigestion or ease stomach cramps, nausea and vomiting. It has been used for sea sickness, headaches, spleen enlargement, catarrh, bronchitis, rheumatism, foot pains, liver and gall bladder disorders, sore gums, as well as a respiratory and heart stimulant, and as a treatment for impotence. It is also used as a body deodorizer and breath cleanser. Side effects of Galangal tea Galangal tea inhibits the release and action of pancreatic lipase, so do not associate it with digestive enzymes. Like most teas, it has precautions when it comes to children and pregnant or breastfeeding women. Galangal tea is basically good for your health but do not exceed 3 cups a day if you want to benefit from its healthy properties.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Gastrodia Tea has been known in traditional Chinese medicine for being a beneficial herbal tea. The root of gastrodia herb is popular for its analgesic, sedative, antispasmodic and carminative properties while the stem is known for its tonic and aphrodisiac properties. Gastrodia (gastrodia elata) grows in parts of Asia, Japan, China, North Korea and Siberian region. Gastrodia plant can be recognized by its orange leafless stem that can grow about 2 meters in height. The constituents of gastrodia roots include 4-Hydroxybenzaldehyde and gastrodine. How To Make Gastrodia Tea If you want to make gastrodia tea out of dried roots, start by boiling 1-1.5 grams of roots for about 20-25 minutes. Then let the tea cool off for about 7 minutes, strain and drink. If you are using the powdered form of gastrodia, just place a handful of powder in a cup of boiled water. Let it steep for about 5 minutes. Gastrodia Tea can be taken twice a day. Gastrodia Tea Benefits
  • Combats pains caused by headaches and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Helps fight dizziness and vertigo.
  • Helpful against epilepsy and tetanus.
  • Works as a sedative being used in treating insomnia.
  • Reduces general fatigue.
Gastrodia Tea Side Effects
  • Can cause skin allergies.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking gastrodia tea.
  • Gastrodia Tea may interact with the effects of some medications.
All in all, Gastrodia Tea is a healthy tea that can really improve your health! Just read the side effects listed below, in order not to experience them!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Golden Monkey tea is a rare and savourless type of black tea, benefic in treating diseases and maintaining a good physical and mental shape. Golden Monkey Tea description Golden Monkey tea is a type of black tea, originating from the Chinese provinces Fujian and Yunnan. It is considered to be the finest black tea from the abovementioned provinces, due to its chocolate flavor, and honey peach notes. According to the legend, its name is related to its appearance: the leaves resemble monkey paws. In ancient times, Golden Monkey tea was consumed by local overlords and Taipans. This tea was rare and the Taipans drank every ounce of tea claiming that it provided them “the agility and sexual prowess of the patriarch of a golden monkey troop”. Golden Monkey Tea brewing Golden Monkey tea could be brewed in two ways: hot or cold. Hot tea brewing method:
  • Bring cold water to a rolling boil.
  • Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot.
  • Pour the boiling water into the teapot.
  • Cover the teapot and let it steep between 3 and 7 minutes according to taste (the longer the soaking time the stronger the tea). Milk and sugar could be added.
Cold tea brewing method  (to prepare 1 liter/quart):
  • Place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher.
  • Pour 1 1/4 cups of boiled water over the tea. Steep it for about 5 minutes.
  • Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water.
  • Pour the tea into the serving pitcher straining the leaves.
  • Add ice and top up the pitcher with cold water.
  • Sugar could be added.
Golden Monkey Tea benefits Like any type of black tea, Golden Monkey tea contains a high content of antioxidants, benefic in fighting free radicals which are responsible for tumors growth and cancer spreading. But also, Golden Monkey tea has a good proven action over:
  • digestive system
  • stressful moods
  • senses
  • metabolic processes
Golden Monkey Tea side effects Golden Monkey tea has few acknowledged side effects. The majority are related to its content of caffeine, which may rarely cause diarrhea or the syndrome of upset stomach. In case of medication intaking, it is advisable to speak with the physician regarding the safety usage and recommended daily allowance of this tea. It is indicated that pregnant women drink Golden Monkey tea in small quantities, so as not to consume more than 300 mg of caffeine per day. Golden Monkey tea, part of the black teas family, is successfully preserving their health benefits and could be easily included in the daily health ritual to gain an impressive stamina.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Goldenrod Tea has been known for its effect in treating kidney disorders. Goldenrod (solidago gigantean) is a yellow colored plant that can reach 3 feet in height. It is frequented by many types of crawling insects and butterflies and the seeds are being dispersed depending on the wind. The plant grows in North American woodlands, dunes and rocks. The constituents of goldenrod tea are saponins, tannins, flavonoids and essential oils. How To Make Goldenrod Tea If you want to brew Goldenrod Tea, place 2-3 teaspoons of dried herb in a cup of boiling water. Let the mix steep for 10-15 minutes. You can drink goldenrod tea twice or three times a day! Goldenrod Tea Benefits
  • Helpful in the treatment of kidney and bladder stones.
  • Alleviates sore throat.
  • Relieves inflammation of the urinary tract.
  • Eases whooping cough.
  • Helps in the treatment of arthritis and rheumatism.
Goldenrod Tea Side Effects
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Goldenrod Tea.
  • Can cause allergic reactions for people who are sensitive to some herbal plants.
  • Can cause fluid retention.
  • Might make the body accumulate more sodium, increasing blood pressure.
  • May interact with the effects of some medications, so make sure you always consult your doctor before drinking goldenrod tea or any type of herbal teas.
Goldenrod Tea makes an excellent choice, being very effective in treating many disorders! Just make sure you read the side effects listed above and make sure you won’t experience them!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Gotu Kola Tea has been known for centuries in India due to its incredible medicinal properties. Gotu kola herb it is also known as Indian Pennywort and it has been recognized all over the world as a botanical medicine since 1884. The herb grows in tropical areas , having green, long stalked leaves with a smooth texture and palmate netted leaves. The main constituents of gotu kola are triterpenoid saponins and sapogenins that give the herb anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, circulatory stimulant and diuretic properties. How To Make Gotu Kola Tea To brew Gotu Kola Tea, you will have to boil about one and a half teaspoon of dried gotu kola herb in a kettle for a few minutes. Let it steep for about 5 minutes and then, by using a strainer, pour the tea into your cup. If you prefer, you can sweeten it with sugar or honey. Gotu Kola Tea Benefits
  • Enhances brain and memory functions.
  • Being an antibacterial, helps the body fight bacteria.
  • Overcomes stress and fatigue.
  • Improves blood flow and prevents blood clots.
  • Helps relieve hemorrhoids.
  • Eases anxiety, acting as a sedative for the central nervous system.
  • Can help in treating ulcers.
  • Effective in treating common cold and flu.
  • Gotu Kola Tea can be safe for pregnant women ONLY when applied on skin for treating stretch marks.
Gotu Kola Tea Side Effects
  • Gotu Kola Tea might cause liver damage in some people.
  • Although Gotu Kola Tea is safe to apply on skin for treating stretch marks associated with pregnancy, pregnant and breastfeeding women shouldn’t drink Gotu Kola Tea.
  • Gotu Kola Tea may cause too much sleepiness if it is combined with medications used during a surgery. Make sure you don’t drink Gotu Kola Tea at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.
Gotu kola tea makes an excellent choice, having many health benefits. Try not to drink more than 2-3 cups of this tea per day and make sure you won’t experience its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Grapefruit Peel Tea is known for many years due to its antibacterial and antifungal properties. As the name suggests, grapefruit peel tea is made from the peel of the grapefruit, the white portion under the rind, which is very rich in antioxidants that help strengthen your immune system. It also contains pectin and fiber, substances that help lower the bad cholesterol levels in the body. How To Make Grapefruit Peel Tea You can make Grapefruit Peel Tea by mincing the white rind of the fruit and placing it in about 8 cups of boiled water. Let the mix boil for about 2 minutes and after that, let it steep for 15 minutes. Keep in mind that grapefruit peel tea has a bitter taste and you might consider sweeten it with honey or sugar. Grapefruit Peel Tea Benefits
  • Helps remove toxins from the body.
  • Clears the respiratory tract.
  • Lowers bad cholesterol.
  • Provides relaxation.
  • Helps fight allergies.
  • Strong allied in the treatment of some digestive and bladder problems.
Grapefruit Peel Tea Side Effects
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Grapefruit Peel Tea.
  • Grapefruit peel tea may interact with the effects of some medications, so make sure you always consult your doctor before drinking grapefruit peel tea.
  • Try not to drink excessive amounts of Grapefruit Peel Tea if you have breast cancer or a higher than usual risk of developing breast cancer.
All in all, Grapefruit Peel Tea can be a healthy start for your day, giving you the energy that you need due to its many vitamins. Just keep in mind its side effects and try to avoid as much as you can experiencing them!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Gravel Root Tea is known for its diuretic, astringent and anti-inflammatory properties. Gravel root (eupatorium purpureum) is a perennial plant that can grow up to 5 feet tall, having pointed oblong leaves and small pink flowers. It grows in North America, from southern Canada through Florida. The main constituents of gravel root are tannins, flavonoids and bitter principles. How To Make Gravel Root Tea To brew Gravel Root Tea, you will need to boil 1 teaspoon of gravel root in a cup of water. Let the mix stand for about 10 minutes. Optionally you can add sugar or honey, depending on your preferences. Gravel root tea can be drank 3 times a day! Gravel Root Tea Benefits
  • Helps prevent the formation of kidney and bladder stones.
  • Effective in treating gout.
  • Relieves fever by encouraging sweating.
  • Treats various urinary problems.
  • Helps relieve constipation.
  • Reduces stomach acidity.
  • In some cases, it can act as an anti-inflammatory, reducing swelling.
Gravel Root Tea Side Effects
  • Due to the fact that Gravel Root Tea contains chemicals called hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), it may block blood flow and cause liver damage.
  • Pregnant women should avoid drinking Gravel Root Tea since it can produce birth defects. Also, if you are breastfeeding, do not drink gravel root tea, because the chemicals (PAs) can affect the breast-milk and harm the baby.
  • Do not apply gravel root on wounds or broken skin. The chemicals can be absorbed quickly through broken skin and can lead to dangerous body-wide toxicity.
Gravel Root Tea makes and excellent choice, having a lot of health benefits. Just make sure you avoid drinking too much gravel root tea in order to stay away from its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

Pregnant (see PREGNANCY AND LABOUR).... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Green tea is considered a “wonder drug” because of its healthy contribution in human diets. Its antioxidant properties fight successfully against cancer, but not only. Green tea description Green tea is made from Camellia sinensis, an Asian plant, originating from China, Japan and South Korea. Oolong tea and black tea are prepared from the same plant as the green tea. A special feature of this type of tea is the ability to block the natural process of fermentation: after being picked, its leaves are steamed, dried and then rolled, thus blocking fermentation. Due to its constituents, it acts as an antioxidant, diuretic, cerebral and fattening burning stimulator, and also as a cancer protector. Green tea has been the subject of many scientific and medical studies so as to determine its health benefits. It seems that regular green tea drinkers may have a lower risk of developing heart diseases and certain types of cancer. There are several types of green tea available on the market: Bancha Tea, Chun Hao Tea , Dao Ren Tea , Dragonwell Tea , Genmaicha Tea , Gunpowder , Gyokuro Tea , Hojicha Tea , Kai Hua Long Ding Tea, Kukicha Tea , Matcha Tea , Sencha Tea , White Monkey Tea. Green Tea brewing To prepare green tea, use: two grams of tea per 100ml of water, or one teaspoon of green tea per five ounce cup. Green tea steeping time varies from thirty seconds to two, three minutes. The temperature differs as well, from 140°F to 190°F. Consumers recommend that lower-quality green teas to be steeped hotter and longer and higher-quality teas to be steeped cooler and shorter. In case of steeping the green tea too hot or too long, the resulting beverage is bitter and astringent. Green Tea benefits Green Tea lowers the risk of cancer. Studies have shown the green tea’s contribution against tumors growth, due to its high content of antioxidants, able to fight free radicals which are responsible for cancer spreading. Green Tea lowers the risk of stroke and heart diseases. The formation of blood clots (or thrombosis) is the main cause of the heart attacks and strokes. Green Tea has been acknowledged to exhibit abnormal blood clot formation. Green Tea lowers blood pressure. Green Tea is proven to block the effects of an enzyme secreted by the kidneys, considered to be one of the main causes of hypertension. Green Tea prevents tooth decay. Dental plaque and bacterial colonies that occur on the tooth surfaces and cause tooth decay can be inhibited by one of the compounds of the green tea. Also, this beverage has been shown to be effective against fighting gum diseases. Green Tea inhibits viruses Studies revealed that green tea can kill certain bacteria and staphs. It blocks the development of several viruses such as viral hepatitis. Green tea has also been successful in:
  • Slowing early aging;
  • Diets;
  • The treatment of physical or intellectual fatigue;
  • Treating fast cold and flu recovery;
  • Preventing allergenic reactions;
  • Balancing body fluids;
  • Improving the immune function of the epidermis;
  • Preventing and mending arthritis;
  • Improving bone structure
Green Tea side effects Green tea is not recommended to patients suffering from high blood pressure, gastric acid secretion, gastritis and ulcer. Due to the amount of caffeine contained, scientists advise a reduced consumption of green tea for pregnant and nursing women. Also, this tea should not be drunk after 5 p.m., because the consumption may lead to insomnia, palpitations and agitation. Green tea is a well known beverage, especially due to its medicinal contribution to a large array of diseases such as arthritis, heart diseases and several types of cancer.... Beneficial Teas

Medicinal Plants

West Indian elm (Guazuma ulmifolia).

Plant Part Used: Root.

Dominican Medicinal Uses: Leaf: decoction, orally, for cough, common cold and flu symptoms. Bark: multi-herb decoction, orally, for menstrual disorders, fibroids, ovarian cysts, menopausal symptoms.

Safety: Leaf: considered safe when used appropriately; low toxicity of shown in animal and clinical studies. No information on safety of the bark.

Contraindications: No information on safety of leaf or bark in children and pregnant or lactating women.

Laboratory & Preclinical Data: In vivo: antidiabetic, hypoglycemic (bark extracts).

In vitro: antibacterial, antiprotozoal and antioxidant (organic plant extracts); antisecretory (bark extract); enzyme inhibition (bark extracts).

* See entry for Guácima in “Part 3: Dominican Medicinal Plant Profiles” of this book for more information, including references.... Medicinal Plants

Beneficial Teas

Guarana tea has been recognized by generations of people from the Amazon as being an energy booster and a strong helper for those with cognitive problems. Guarana is a climbing plant that grows in the Amazon and in the tropical forests of Brazil. Its seeds are mostly used as a caffeine substitute in energy drinks. The constituents of guarana plant are caffeine (guarana tea contains 2.5 times the amount of caffeine than coffee) and traces of theophylline and thebromine (commonly used as stimulants). How To Make Guarana Tea You can make guarana tea by boiling 2 grams of crushed guarana seeds in 250 ml of water. Let it boil for about 10 minutes then wait for it to cool down a little bit. Then, by using a trainer to catch the guarana seeds, pour the tea into your cup. Optionally, sweeten it with sugar or honey. Guarana Tea Benefits
  • Guarana tea may be effective in treating headaches, but only as a short-term treatment, according to the University of Colorado Denver College of Pharmacy.
  • Enhances memory, alertness and other cognitive capacities.
  • Boosts energy and alleviates depression.
  • Treats chronic diarrhea.
Guarana Tea Side Effects The side effects of guarana tea are associated with over consumption. If you drink too much guarana tea you may experience the same side effects that you can have when drinking too much coffee, such as:
  • Anxiety
  • Trembling
  • Hyperactivity
  • Frequent urination
  • Palpitation
Needless to say, pregnant and breastfeeding woman should not drink guarana tea! All in all, do not drink more than 3 cups of guarana tea per day! This way your body gets the exact amount of caffeine that it needs and you can be sure you would not experience its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Gymnema tea is known for its sugar killing properties. Gymnema (gymnema sylvestre) is a woody plant that grows mainly in the forests of central and southern India. The plant climbs on bushes and trees, has elliptical leaves and small flowers with a yellow corolla. Gymnema is also known as the “destroyer of sugar”. In ancient times, some physicians noticed that chewing gymnema leaves can suppress the taste of sugar. Currently, gymnena is being administrated in India to those who suffer from diabetes, for increasing insulin levels and controlling the blood sugar levels. The constituents of gymnema tea are gymnemic acid, parabin, glucose and carbohydrates. How To Make Gymnema Tea Brewing gymnema tea is a very simple process. You can make it by combining dried gymnema leaves with green tea loose leaf and placing them into boiled water. Let the mix steep for about 5-7 minutes. The more you let it steep, the more intensified the flavor will be. Gymnema Tea Benefits
  • Helps reducing blood sugar levels.
  • Is a strong allied in the process of weight loss.
  • May help treat swollen glands.
  • Has anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Helps treating snakebites.
  • Reduces the craving for sugar.
Gymnema Tea Side Effects
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should not drink gymnema tea. Not enough is known about consuming gymnema tea during pregnancy so, it is better to avoid it.
  • Gymnema tea may interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgical procedures.
Ass you can see, gymnema tea has a lot of health benefits. Just make sure you stay away from its side effects and, also, avoid over-consumption! No more than 1-2 cups of gymnema tea per day!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Gyokuro tea is said to be the finest type of green tea. It is largely consumed for its health properties, but also for its unique taste. Its ingredients balance the diet in a harmonious way. Gyokuro tea description Gyokuro tea, or in translation “Jewel Dew”, is a fine type of green tea. It has a deep green colour and a rich seaweed and mellow taste flavor. Itscomponentsare theanine, caffeine, tannin and vitamin C. Theanine provides the tea’s flavor, caffeine its bitterness, and tannin its astringency. Gyokuro tea’s high quality and price are related to the unusual growing techniques. The tea is made only with the earliest leaf buds of the April/May harvest. The aforementioned tea is grown under shade cover for 20 days before harvesting begins. It is considered the best of the Japanese teas and offers consumers a refreshing experience. How to prepare Gyokuro tea Gyokuro tea is advisable to be drunk alone, without mixing it with milk or sugar. Occasionally, one can only serve it with a piece of dark chocolate. It seems that its leaves can be eaten, being soft and healthy.
  • Use good quality water to prepare a good Gyokuro tea
  • The optimal brewing temperature is between 122 F and 140 F degrees.
  • First, preheat the cups or the teapot, because pouring the moderately warm tea into a cold cup changes its temperature.
  • Pour some of the boiled water into the tea kettle and wait one or two minutes.
  • Add the leaves and the remaining water.
  • Use 2 table spoons of tea to approx. 4-5 ounces of water.
  • Brewing time is between two and three minutes. While brewing, don’t mix, stir or shake the tea. Try to leave enough room for the leaves to expand.
Gyokuro tea benefits Due to its high content of antioxidants, Gyokuro tea reduces the risk of cancer. It can fight the free radicals responsible for the growth of tumors. This type of tea has a large contribution in making cells less likely to be affected by mutations. There have been instances in which it helped to cell recovery. Gyokuro tea can be successfully used to:
  • stimulate the metabolism
  • burn off  calories
  • lower cholesterol
  • protect against various cardiovascular diseases
  • soothe and relax the mind
  • enhance cognition and alertness
  • improve concentration
  • keep one energetic
  • prevent dental plaque, bacterial infections and dental decay
  • freshen your breathe
  • protect against bacteria
Gyokuro tea side effects In case of large intakes of Gyokuro tea, insomnia may appear, especially to consumers already suffering from a sleep pattern disorder. Agitation and anxiety are other side effects caused by the content of caffeine. Children, people with heart medical problems and pregnant women are normally told to avoid Gyokuro tea or to drink it in limited quantities. Gyokuro tea contains a great quantity of antioxidants and caffeine that better people’s daily activities by enhancing their state of mind and well-being.  ... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A drug that raises the quantity of HAEMOGLOBIN in the blood. Ferrous sulphate is a common example of iron-containing compounds given to anaemic (see ANAEMIA) patients whose condition is due to iron de?ciency. Traditionally, haematinics have been used to prevent anaemia in pregnant women, but nowadays a maternal diet containing iron-rich foods and regular antenatal checks of haemoglobin concentrations in the blood should make the routine use of haematinics unnecessary.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

The benefits of Chrysanthemum Tea were discovered centuries ago by Chinese and Oriental people who used it for medicinal purposes and as a natural coolant. About Chrysanthemum Tea Chrysanthemum Tea is a herbal tea made from Chrysanthemum flowers of the species Chrysanthemum morifolium or Chrysanthemum indicum, which are most popular in Eastern Asia. The chrysanthemum is a leafy plant, adorned with clusters of daisy-like flowers. The plant can be found worldwide. The constituents of chrysanthemum are vitamin C, beta-cartone, calcium, fiber, folacin, iron, magnesium, niacin, potassium and riboflavin. Chrysanthemum tea has a delicate, slightly floral aroma and a light, refreshing taste. How to brew Chrysanthemum Tea To prepare a tasty cup of Chrysantemum tea, it is usually recommended to use around 3 or 5 dried flowers for every 250ml of water. Let the flowers steep in hot water at 90°c in a teapot until the liquid turns light yellow. You can add rock sugar as well, to enhance its flavor. Chrysanthemum tea is slightly yellow in color and has a floral aroma and taste. In Chinese tradition, once a pot of chrysanthemum tea has been drunk, hot water is typically added again over the flowers in the pot (producing a tea that is slightly less strong); this process is repeated several times. Chrysanthemum Tea Benefits Chrysanthemum tea is not very famous amongst herb enthusiasts, and  that is because very few people know about its existence and benefits. Chrysanthemum Tea may help lower blood pressure and consequently, may also help in the treatment of other related ailments like angina and other heart problems. It may also help relieve headaches. Chrysanthemum Tea may help in the treatment of colds, fever and the flu or tinnitus. This type of tea may help in the treatment of skin problems such as acne, boils and sores. Chrysanthemum Tea is believed to contribute in clearing the vision and improving the general eyesight. Chrysanthemum Tea has stimulating property and helps in alerting the senses and rejuvenating the brain. It stimulates all your senses very quickly and also calms down the nerves. Chrysanthemum Tea is drunk or used as a compress to treat circulatory disorders such as varicose veins and atherosclerosis. Chrysanthemum Tea Side Effects There are some side effects associated to the Chrysanthemum tea consumption. In some cases, it may cause contact dermatitis and photosensitivity. Do not associate this tea with other sedatives or high blood pressure medicine as it may intensify the effects of those drugs. Do not take this tea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. If you take into consideration the precautions above and you do not drink too much of it, you can include Chrysanthemum tea in your healthy lifestyle and enjoy its taste and benefits.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Schizonepeta tea is a pretty aromatic herbal tea, which can work as a perfect daily hot beverage. It has plenty of health benefits which should convince you to give it a try. Find out more about this herbal tea. About Schizonepeta Tea Schizonepeta tea is made from the leaves, stems and/or flowers of the schizonepeta plant. Also known as Japanese catnip, it grows especially in China and Japan. Schizonepeta is an annual plant that has a scent similar to that of pine. The plant has small, lavender flowers that grow together in bunches. The plants are usually harvested during autumn and winter. The useful parts (stems, leaves and flowers) are dried in the shade and cut into pieces. How to prepare Schizonepeta Tea To enjoy schizonepeta tea, add stems, leaves or flowers to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for 5-7 minutes, then strain to remove the herbs. If you want your tea to have a stronger flavor, let it steep for about 10 minutes. Schizonepeta Tea Benefits Schizonepeta tea has plenty of health benefits, thanks to the active constituents of the plant. These include menthol, menthone, caffeic acid, schizonodiol, cineole, and hesperidin. Schizonepeta tea is useful when you’re dealing with hemorrhages. It can be generally used to help with post-natal bleeding and excessive menstruation. Also, it can be used to treat uterine hemorrhage, vomiting blood, and hemafecia. This tea can help with itchiness, especially in the nose, throat, and palate. It is useful when you’ve got an allergic reaction, as well, and can treat fevers. Schizonepeta tea can also be applied topically. It can be used when you’ve got skin conditions, such as psoriasis, boils and rashes. Also, together with honeysuckle, forsythia, and ledebouriella root, it can treat pus-generating infections. Drinking schizonepeta tea can also help you when you’re dealing with mastitis and carbuncle. It is also used to lessen inflammations and swellings. Schizonepeta Tea Side Effects When it comes to schizonepeta tea side effects, there aren’t too many to mention. It is recommended that pregnant and breastfeeding women shouldn’t drink this tea, as it might affect the baby in both cases. Also, if you’ve got liver problems, you should stay away from schizonepeta tea, as well. It might cause more damage.   Schizonepeta tea definitely has more health benefits than side effects. This should convince you to give it a try and maybe include it in your daily diet.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Helichrysum tea is known for its diuretic, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties. Considered one of the oldest healing substances in Europe Helichrysum is native to Africa, Madagascar and Eurasia. The plants can be annuals, herbaceous perennials or shrubs that can grow up to 60-90 cm. Helichrysum flower can be distinguished by its fringed margin and its resemblance with daisies. The constituents of the Helichrysum flowers include flavonoids, kaempferol flucosides, apigenin, luetolin, quercetin and essential oils. How To Make Helichrysum Tea In order to obtain Helichrysum`s light fruity flavor, start by infusing a handful of dried Helichrysum flowers in a kettle of boiled water. Let the mix steep for about 7 minutes and enjoy! Also, Helichrysum can be used as a flavoring agent for other herbal teas. Basically, soak the Helichrysum flowers as the other herbal tea steeps. Helichrysum Tea Benefits
  • Improves digestion.
  • Alleviates gastrointestinal spasms.
  • Prevents atherosclerotic plaques.
  • Helps in the treatment of rheumatism.
  • Helps fight cystitis.
  • Energy booster.
  • Calms menstrual cramps.
Helichrysum Tea Side Effects
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Helichrysum tea.
  • Helichrysum tea may interact with the effects of certain medications or supplements, so make sure you always consult your doctor before drinking Helichrysum tea or any herbal teas.
As you can see, Helichrysum tea has more benefits than side effects. Just avoid over-consumption and enjoy its wonderful health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A type of severe PRE-ECLAMPSIA (a disorder a?ecting some pregnant women) that a?ects various systems in the body. HAEMOLYSIS, raised concentration of the enzymes in the LIVER, and a low blood platelet count are among the characteristics (and explain the name HELLP); patients are acutely ill and immediate termination of pregnancy is necessary. (See also PREGNANCY AND LABOUR.)... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Hibiscus tea is one of the most famous herbal tea drinks around the world. It is made from the red hibiscus flower, which is dried and steeped. Hibiscus tea can be drank either hot or cold and it is recognized for being a strong allied in the weight loss process. Hibiscus tea contains organic acids such as citric acid, malic acid and tartaric acid. This tea can be taken as a traditional supplement or as a natural medicine since it produces Vitamin C and minerals. How to make Hibiscus tea To prepare a perfect cup of hibiscus tea, first of all you will need to boil the water into a kettle. Then measure 2 teaspoons of hibiscus flowers or more if you want a stronger flavor. After the water is boiled, place the hibiscus flowers into the kettle and let it steep for about 10 minutes. Then pour the tea into a cup using a strainer to catch the hibiscus flowers. To enhance the flavor, you can always add lemon juice, sugar or even cinnamon. Hibiscus Tea benefits
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Some studies revealed that people who suffer from type 2 diabetes may benefits from drinking this tea.
  • In Eastern medicine, hibiscus tea is used to treat liver problems
  • Due to the fact that hibiscus tea stops the body from absorbing too many carbohydrates, it is a string allied in the weight loss process.
  • Since it contains Vitamin C, hibiscus tea helps preventing colds, flu and also, strengthens your immune system.
Hibiscus tea side effects
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking hibiscus tea.
  • People with low blood pressure are not advised to drink hibiscus tea.
  • You should be careful if you want to drink hibiscus tea for the first time since it can (rarely) produce hallucinogenic effects or even cause a sensations similar to intoxication.
  • If you are taking any type of anti-inflammatories and want to drink hibiscus tea, drink it two hours after taking the medicine.
Hibiscus tea makes a wonderful drink either on cold winter days or on hot summer days, since it can be consumed either hot or cold. Enjoy its benefits and try not to experience any of its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Medicinal Plants

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare).

Plant Part Used: Seeds.

Dominican Medicinal Uses: Seeds: decoction, orally, for digestive ailments, flatulence, stomach pain, pasmo, infant colic, inflammation, allergy, sinus infection and women’s health. Leaves: decoction, orally, for stomach ache, indigestion and gas.

Safety: Widely consumed and considered safe; caution advised if used in anise tea: seeds are often combined with anís de estrella which may be adulterated by poisonous look-alike.

Contraindications: Essential oil: epileptics, young children, pregnancy; herb considered safe for children and pregnant women.

Clinical Data: Human clinical trial: infant colic treatment (seed extract and essential oil emulsion).

* See entry for Hinojo in “Part 3: Dominican Medicinal Plant Profiles” of this book for more information, including references.... Medicinal Plants

Beneficial Teas

Hojicha tea is a type of Japanese green tea which is made from the sun-grown Japanese green tea known as bancha, harvested from the tea plant later in the season.Hojicha tea is roasted in a porcelain pot over charcoal at a high temperature, fact that alters the leaf color from green to reddish-brown. Hojicha tea has been certified as organic by the government of Japan. Brewing Hojicha tea There are many ways of preparing Hojicha tea, depending on each and other person’s taste. For example, shorter infusions of Hojicha tea may produce a fresh flavor, while longer infusions are more developed and have a “nuttier” taste. For starters, heat the the teapot with boiling water. The heat of the water is the one that brings out the aroma of Hojicha tea, so it shouldn’t be boiled at more than 180°F (80 degrees Celsius). The next step is adding the tea inside the teapot, one tablespoon of tea for each serving, when the water has just boiled. Then, depending on the flavor that you want, let it steep between 30 - 90 seconds.  In the end, pour the tea into a cup, making sure to use all the water in the teapot. Hojicha tea is usually served after the evening meal or before bed since it has lower caffeine content than other green teas. Components of Hojicha tea The main components of Hojicha tea are, like most green teas, tannin, caffeine, theanine (which is an amino acid) and Vitamin C.  Hojicha tea is known for the low amounts of caffeine and tannin (less astringency), fact that makes the tea easier to drink in the evening and it is also more suitable for children and elders.  Since it lacks in caffeine, some people even drinkHojicha tea to replace coffee, or before bed for a deep and calm sleep. Hojicha tea benefits Hojicha tea has a lot of health benefits, even though the same process that removes the caffeine also reduces the antioxidants. Due to the fact that Hojicha tea is actually a green tea, it basically presents the same benefits as any other green tea:
  • Hojicha tea helps fighting against diseases caused by viruses or bacteria and strengthens the immune system.
  • Hojicha tea helps protect against cardiovascular diseases, tumors and it’s also an important element when it comes to cancer prevention.
  • Hojicha tea is a strong allied in the process of weight loss.
  • Hojicha tea gives an overall well-being and helps you relax.
 Hojicha tea side effects Hojicha tea, because of the low caffeine, tannin and theanine content doesn’t actually present any particular side effects. However, being a green tea you should be aware of the following side effects that may appear if it is not consumed properly:
  • You should not drinkHojicha tea when you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • If you suffer from anemia or iron deficiency. According to some studies, green tea extract reduces the absorption of iron by 25%.
  • It is advised not to drink green tea on an empty stomach since it could cause liver damage.
  • Avoid green tea if you have kidney disorders or stomach ulcers.
All in all, try not to drink more than 6 cups a day of Hojicha green tea. If you are a green tea drinker or if you just want to try a different tea taste, besides the herbal flavor that most green teas have, you should not miss Hojicha tea. The components of Hojicha tea helps improve your immune system and, generally, keeps you healthy. It’s perfect for cold winter days!  ... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Honeybush Tea is a South African tea known for its healing properties. The herb got this name due to the scent of its flowers than resembles to the one that honey has. Its taste is very similar to the one of rooibos tea, but a little sweeter and it doesn’t have any caffeine content. The main constituents of Honeybush Tea are iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese and sodium. It is also known for its antioxidant properties. How To Make Honeybush Tea Start by infusing 2 tablespoons of dried honeybush herbs in a liter of boiled water for about 20 minutes. After that, strain the Honeybush Tea and enjoy! To really maximize its health benefits, try not to add any sweetener or milk. Honeybush Tea Benefits
  • Helps fight indigestion and ease constipation.
  • Strong allied in the process of weight loss.
  • Lowers blood cholesterol levels.
  • May stimulate milk production in breastfeeding women.
  • Expectorant.
  • Helps ease insomnia.
  • Strengthens your immune system.
  • Eases menopausal symptoms.
  • Helps in the treatment of asthma and certain allergies.
Honeybush Tea Side Effects Honeybush Tea has no side effects whatsoever. Just avoid over-consumption and make sure you always consult your doctor before drinking it. Honeybush Tea, like most herbal teas, may interact with the effects of some medications. Also, if you are pregnant, try to drink honeybush tea in small amounts. All in all, Honeybush Tea is a healthy tea with slightly no side effects! Just enjoy it and make sure you enjoy its wonderful benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Honeysuckle tea has been known in Chinese medicine as being an efficient herb for eliminating heat and accumulated toxins from the body. The honeysuckle is a climbing plant that grows in the Northern Hemisphere. It can reach up to 12 feet in length and can be recognized by its oval-shaped leaves and by its tubular shaped, yellow or white flowers. The constituents of honeysuckle are tannins, inositol, luteolin and volatile oils which are active in the flowers just before the bud opens. How To Make Honeysuckle Tea To brew Honeysuckle Tea, you need to place 1 cup of honeysuckle flowers in 1 quart of boiling water. Let the tea steep for about 10-15 minutes and enjoy! You can drink 3 cups of honeysuckle tea per day. Honeysuckle Tea Benefits
  • Helps fight bladder infections.
  • Alleviates sores and swellings of the eyes, breast and throat.
  • Honeysuckle Tea alleviates fever.
  • It is said that it inhibits the bacteria that causes salmonella, strep and tuberculosis.
  • Treats nausea and vomiting caused by hepatitis C.
  • Stops the pain caused by headaches.
Honeysuckle Tea Side Effects
  • People who suffer from chronic diarrhea caused by treatment from chronic diseases should avoid drinking Honeysuckle Tea.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should not drink Honeysuckle Tea.
  • Honeysuckle Tea may increase the risk of extra bleeding during and after a surgery. Make sure you stop consuming honeysuckle tea at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.
Honeysuckle Tea is a great herbal tea, that has many benefits for your health. Just make sure you don’t drink more than 3 cups per day in order to avoid its side effects.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Horehound Tea is popular for being effective in treating respiratory problems, having antiseptic, anti-spasmodic, expectorant, diaphoretic and diuretic properties. Horehound is a perennial herb that grows in places like meadows, pastures, railroad tracks in the United States, Canada and Europe. Horehound can be recognized by its wrinkled leaves. The main constituents of horehound tea include flavonoids, marrubin, caffeine, resin, tannins, fat and sugar. How To Make Horehound Tea To brew Horehound Tea, place about 2 teaspoons of horehound tea in boiling water. After that, let the mix steep for about 10-15 minutes. Having a bitter taste, the tea can be flavored with lemon juice and sweetened with molasses. Horehound Tea Benefits
  • Horehound Tea helps fighting respiratory disorders such as cough or asthma.
  • Calms headaches caused by sinus infection.
  • Relieves pain caused by cough or indigestion.
  • Fights sore throat.
Horehound Tea Side Effects
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Horehound Tea.
  • Black Horehound Tea contains certain chemicals that may affect treatment for Parkinson`s disease.
  • Horehound Tea may interact with the effects of some medications, so avoid drinking this tea without medical advice.
Horehound Tea is a wonderful tea with many health benefits. Just try not to experience its side effects and enjoy its amazing benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A hormone produced by the PLACENTA during pregnancy. It is similar to the pituitary GONADOTROPHINS, which are blocked during pregnancy. Large amounts appear in a woman’s urine when she is pregnant and are used as the basis for pregnancy tests. Human gonadotrophins are used to treat delayed puberty and premenstrual tension.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Horse Chestnut tea has been known for many years due to its astringent, anti-inflammatory, expectorant and tonic properties. It grows in the Balkan areas and in Western Asia and can reach a height of 100 feet. The leaves of horse chestnut tree are 12 inches long and the buds are large and sticky. Most of the health benefits derive from the tree’s bark and leaves. The bark contains coumarins, aesculetin, fraxin, quercetin, sterols, tannins and saponins. The leaves are full of coumadins, aesculin, scopolin, fraxin, stigmasterol, beta-sitosterol and rutin. How To Make Horse Chestnut Tea You can make horse chestnut tea either from the bark or leaves. To brew horse chestnut tea from the bark, you need to boil for about 5-10 minutes a tablespoon of tea in a kettle of water. To make horse chestnut tea from the leaves, place about a fistful of leaves into a cup of boiled water and let it steep for about 7 - 10 minutes. The nut of horse chestnut can only be used for external applications, since they could be poisonous otherwise! Horse Chestnut Tea Benefits The nuts have the following benefits:
  • Strengthens varicose veins.
  • Can help treat hemorrhoids.
  • Helps treating arthritis and rheumatic pains.
  • Helpful in treating various skin conditions such as: rashes, eczema or burns.
The leaves include the following benefits:
  • Provides relaxation and a restful sleep.
  • May help treat dysentery.
  • Alleviates fever and malaria.
  • Relieves menstrual cramps.
Horse Chestnut Tea Side Effects
  • Horse chestnut flower can cause allergic reactions.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Horse Chestnut Tea.
  • Horse Chestnut Tea may lower blood sugar levels, so avoid drinking this tea if you suffer from diabetes.
  • Don’t drink horse chestnut tea if you have bowel or stomach disorders.
  • If you have a liver condition, avoid drinking horse chestnut.
  • Avoid drinking Horse Chestnut Tea if you suffer from kidney problems.
All in all, Horse Chestnut Tea is a healthy tea with many health benefits! Enjoy drinking and try to not experience any of its side effects.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Huang Jin Gui Tea, meaning “Golden Osmanthus”, is a type ofoolong tea, originating from the Fujian province of China. The drink earns its name through the golden liquor obtained after infusing the yellowish green leaves which offer the tea a distinct flowery honeysuckle aroma of Osmathus. The sweet flowery scent combines with a fruity flavour and complex refreshing taste. Huang Jin Gui Tea Brewing Huang Jin Gui Tea leaves allow multiple infusions, each of them providing a new character to the beverage. The brewing of Huang Jin Gui Tea should be made at a temperature of approximately 85 degrees Celsius. Allow two or three minutes for the steeping process in order to obtain a mild, smooth flavour. If brewed according to these instructions, Huang Jin Gui tea is low in caffeine. When to Drink Huang Jin Gui Tea A cup of Huang Jin Gui tea is suitable for drinking at any point during the day because it is only slightly oxidized and lacks the astringency of green tea. Its delightful light taste and floral aroma guarantee you will gladly enjoy several cups a day, discovering new layers of taste after every brew. You can serve it how or cold and benefit from the long lasting aftertaste and subtle hint of honey. Huang Jin Gui Tea Health Benefits Huang Jin Gui Tea brings a variety ofhealth benefits for the drinker, which include a valuable aid in the process of losing weight. Drinking Huang Jin Gui tea benefits your skin and strengthens your teeth. It is also a contributive factor in the prevention of cancer and heart disease and it helps improving the drinker’s metabolism and overall life quality. Huang Jin Gui tea helps reduce the blood sugar levels, which is beneficial for diabetic patients and last, but not least, it has a stress-relieving effect and it stimulates mental awareness. Huang Jin Gui Tea Side Effects As compared with the health benefits it brings, the side effects of Huang Jin Gui Tea are almost insignificant. The most common side effects are related to the large caffeine intake, which can lead to insomnia, dizziness, nausea, headaches or irregular heartbeat. Huang Jin Gui tea is not recommended for pregnant or nursing women and people who suffer from stomach ulcers, kidney or heart problems. Moreover, it is strongly advisable to consult with a specialist before includingHuang Jin Gui tea into your dietary plan, as the drink could interact with certain medications. Huang Jin Gui is a delicious variety of oolong tea with a rich, brisk taste that brings along an energy surplus. It is relatively easy to prepare and the leaves can be infused at least three times, surprising the drinker with each cup.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Iceland Moss Tea is known by the people from Iceland, Finland, Norway, Russia and Sweden as being a remedy for disorders of the respiratory system. The Iceland moss grows mainly in the tree barks of Iceland and most Scandinavian countries and reaches a height of almost 4 inches. You can distinguish the plant by its curled leaves and unique spiny margins. The constituent of Iceland Moss Tea is the lichenin, a type of starch. It also contains polysaccharides that strengthen your immune system. How To Make Iceland Moss Tea To make Iceland Moss Tea you will need to place a teaspoon of dried Iceland moss herbs in a kettle of boiling water. Let it boil for about 3 minutes and after that let the mix stand for 10 minutes. It is advised to drink 2 cups of Iceland Moss Tea per day, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. Iceland Moss Tea Benefits
  • Helps treating bronchitis.
  • Cough remedy.
  • Helps combat irritable bowel infections, gastritis and dysentery.
  • Prevents congestion.
  • Fights infestation of intestinal worms.
Iceland Moss Tea Side Effects
  • Over consumption can be unsafe, because the dried Iceland moss plant can be contaminated with lead.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Iceland Moss Tea. During pregnancy, it can be harmful to the mother and to the unborn child.
  • It can cause ulcers in the stomach or small intestine.
  • Iceland Moss Tea may interact with the effects of some medications, so make sure you always consult your doctor before drinking Iceland Moss Tea or any kind of herbal tea.
  • It can cause nausea and liver problems.
Iceland Moss Tea is a healthy herbal tea known for its medicinal properties. Try not to drink more than 1-2 cups per day of Iceland Moss Tea in order not to experience its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Medicinal Plants Glossary

An infectious skin disease caused usually by Staphylococcus aureus and less often by Streptococcus pyogenes. The itching rash is seen especially on the face but may spread widely. Vesicles and pustules erupt and dry to form yellow-brown scabs. Untreated, the condition may last for weeks. In very young infants, large blisters may form (bullous impetigo).

Treatment Crusts should be gently removed with SALINE. Mild cases respond to frequent application of mupiricin or NEOMYCIN/BACITRACIN ointment; more severe cases should be treated orally or, sometimes, intravenously with FLUCLOXACILLIN or one of the CEPHALOSPORINS. If the patient is allergic to penicillin, ERYTHROMYCIN can be used.

For severe, intractable cases, an oral retinoid drug called isotretinoin (commercially produced as Roaccutane®) can be used. It is given systemically but treatment must be supervised by a consultant dermatologist as serious side-e?ects, including possible psychiatric disturbance, can occur. The drug is also teratogenic (see TERATOGENESIS), so women who are, or who may become, pregnant must not take isotretinoin. It acts mainly by suppressing SEBUM production in the sebaceous glands and can be very e?ective. Recurrent bouts of impetigo should raise suspicion of underlying SCABIES or head lice. Bactericidal soaps and instilling an antibiotic into the nostrils may also help.... Medicinal Plants Glossary

Beneficial Teas

Indigo Root Tea has been known for many years due to its antiseptic, astringent, antibiotic, emetic and antibacterial properties. Wild indigo (baptisia tinctoria) is a herbaceous annual plant that can be recognized by its branching stems and bluish green leaves. Its flowers usually bloom during May and September and they pose as bright yellow flowers. The constituents of Indigo Root Tea are flavonoids, isoflavones, alkaloids, coumarins and polysaccharides. They usually are active when the indigoo root is made into a decoction or used as a tincture. How To Make Indigo Root Tea If you want to make Indigo Root Tea, simply place a handful of indigo root in a cup of boiling water for about 10-15 minutes. After that, take it out of the heat and let it stand for about 3 minutes. Indigo Root Tea Benefits
  • Strenghtens the immune system.
  • Can speed recovery from the common cold.
  • Helps heal wounds and cuts.
  • Treats respiratory infections such as pharyngitis and tonsilitis.
  • Heals sore thorat.
  • Helps reduce fever.
  • Helps in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome when combined with echinacea.
Indigo Root Tea Side Effects
  • Taking in large doses, Indigo Root Tea can cause nausea, diarrhea, voming or asphyxiation.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Indigo Root Tea.
  • People with auto-immune disorders should not drink Indigo Root Tea.
Indigo Root Tea is an amazing tea with many health benefits. Just make sure you don’t drink too much indigo root tea, in order not to experience any of its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

The number of deaths of infants under one year of age. The IMR in any given year is calculated as the number of deaths in the ?rst year of life in proportion to every 1,000 registered live births in that year. Along with PERINATAL MORTALITY, it is accepted as one of the most important criteria for assessing the health of the community and the standard of the social conditions of a country.

The improvement in the infant mortality rate has occurred mainly in the period from the second month of life. There has been much less improvement in the neonatal mortality rate – that is, the number of infants dying during the ?rst four weeks of life, expressed as a proportion of every 1,000 live births. During the ?rst week of life the main causes of death are asphyxia, prematurity, birth injuries and congenital abnormalities. After the ?rst week the main cause of death is infection.

Social conditions also play an important role in infant mortality. In England and Wales the infant mortality rate in 1930–32 was: Social Class I (professional), 32·7; Social Class III (skilled workers), 57·6; Social Class V (unskilled workers), 77·1. Many factors come into play in producing these social variations, but overcrowding is undoubtedly one of the most important.

1838–9 146 1950–52 30 1851–60 154 1960–62 22 1900–02 142 1970–72 18 1910–12 110 1980–82 12 1920–22 82 1990–92 7 1930–32 67 1996 6·2 1940–42 59 1999 5.8 2000 5.6

It is thus evident that for a reduction of the infant mortality rate to the minimum ?gure, the following conditions must be met. Mothers and potential mothers must be housed adequately in healthy surroundings, particularly with regard to safe water supplies and sewage disposal. The pregnant and nursing mother must be ensured an adequate diet. E?ective antenatal supervision must be available to every mother, as well as skilled supervision during labour (see PREGNANCY AND LABOUR). The newborn infant must be adequately nursed and fed and mothers encouraged to breast feed. Environmental and public-health measures must be taken to ensure adequate housing, a clean milk supply and full availability of medical care including such protective measures as IMMUNISATION against diphtheria, measles, poliomyelitis and whooping-cough. (See also PERINATAL MORTALITY.)... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

The IMMUNISATION of a person by an ANTIGEN they do not have but which is present in other people. For example, a rhesus-negative mother does not carry the rhesus antigen. If she carries a rhesus-positive baby, passage of the rhesus antigen from the baby into the mother’s circulation may cause her to be iso-immunised. Her immune system (see IMMUNITY) may then produce ANTIBODIES to the rhesus antigen. When she next becomes pregnant, if the baby is again rhesus positive, the mother will produce large amounts of anti-Rh antibodies which can enter the fetal circulation and cause its blood cells to break up. (See HAEMOLYTIC DISEASE OF THE NEWBORN; BLOOD GROUPS.)... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Jasmine tea is a Chinese tea made from jasmine flowers. This tea is one of the most popular teas in China, being a specialty for over 800 years. It is basically used as a green, white or oolong tea having a subtle sweet flavor. How To Make Jasmine Tea Brewing jasmine tea is not such a difficult process. First of all you will need to boil the water. Add 1 tablespoon of jasmine leaves into your teapot or infuser and pour the hot water over it. Cover it and let it steep for about 3 minutes, but no longer than 5 minutes because you may obtain a bitter taste. If you didn’t use an infuser, make sure you use a strainer when you pour the tea into your cup to catch the jasmine blooms. Since it already has a sweet, floral taste it is advised not to put any sweetener, but if you want you can add some sugar or honey. Jasmine Tea Benefits Jasmine tea is full of antioxidants that protect your body against the damage that free radicals can cause to your body cells. Jasmine tea helps you lose weight thanks to the combination between caffeine and antioxidants. Also, this tea reduces fat and encourages cholesterol absorption. Some studies revealed that jasmine tea may help prevent cancer. Jasmine is also used for its calming effects in aromatherapy as an essential oil. Judging by this fact, drinking a cup of jasmine tea also provides you relaxation. Jasmine Tea Side Effects Over consumption may lead to certain side effects. For example, jasmine tea has caffeine content that heightens alertness and reduces sleepiness. Also, caffeine increases secretion of stress hormones, insomnia and dehydration so try not to drink too much jasmine tea. One or two cups of jasmine tea a day! Needless to say, pregnant and breastfeeding woman are advised not to drink jasmine tea, also because of its caffeine content. Enjoy this wonderful scented tea and all its benefits! Do not drink more than 2 cups of jasmine tea per day, this way making sure you won’t experience any of its side effects.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Juniper Tea is made from juniper, an evergreen tree that grows mainly in Europe, northern Asia and North America. It grows basically in siliceous soils and their sizes and shapes differ: from tall trees to columnar or low spreading shrubs with long trailing branches. Juniper fruits are purple, blue, violet or brown and are typically harvested in early autumn. They are often used as flavoring agent in food. The main constituents of juniper fruits are alpha and beta-pinene, tannins, vitamin C, diterpenes and flavonoids. How To Make Juniper Tea To brew a perfect cup of juniper tea you will need to add 1 tablespoon of dried juniper berries in one cup of boiled water. Let it steep for about 15-20 minutes than, using a strainer to catch the juniper fruits, pour the tea into your cup and enjoy! Depending on your taste, you can add sugar or honey. Juniper Tea Benefits Juniper tea has been recognized in folk medicine as being a diuretic and a strong allied in kidney and bladder problems. Other benefits that you can experience when drinking this tea are:
  • Juniper Tea helps treating arthritis, rheumatism and gout.
  • Stimulates the appetite.
  • Stimulates menstrual flow.
  • Supports the functions of the stomach.
  • Helps treating colic, indigestion and flatulence.
Juniper Tea Side Effects Like in the case of other herbal teas, pregnant or breastfeeding women shouldn’t drink juniper tea without consulting their doctor first. If applied on open wounds, it may cause irritation and swelling. Also, juniper tea may interfere with diuretic drugs, the absorption of iron and other minerals. Over consumption may lead to:
  • Diarrhea
  • Kidney pain
  • Intestinal pain
  • Blood in the urine
  • High blood pressure
Juniper Tea makes a wonderful tea choice, thanks to its medicinal and healing properties. Just remember not to drink too much of it, though. Over consumption may lead to the side effects listed above! Two cups of juniper tea per day should be just enough!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Keemun tea is a popular Chinese black tea produced in Qimen County in the Anhui Province of China. It is classified as being a top quality black tea around the globe, especially in the British market whereKeemun tea is considered a delicacy. The tea gained popularity very quickly in England where it has become an important ingredient in English Breakfast tea blends. Keemun tea comes from a sub-variety of the Chinese tea plant Camellia Sinensis, named Zhu-ye-zhing which grows in a mountainous area covered by forest in Anhui Province. In that area, the lack of sun, high humidity and low temperature allow the growth of perfect thin black tea leaves which are withered, rubbed, twirled and then baked dry. There are many Keemun tea varieties such as:
  • Keemun Gongfu or Congou which has thin, dark and tight shaped leaves.
  • Keemun Mao Feng which has slightly twisted leaf buds and a smoother flavor. For a proper taste, it is recommended to brew a smaller quantity of this type of tea and let it steep for 7 minutes.
  • Keemun Xin Ya - a type of tea with a less bitter taste.
  • Keemun Hao Ya
Keemun Tea brewing If it is properly brewed, you will obtain a clear red color cup of Keemun tea with a fruity, exotic and floral (but not as floral as Darjeeling tea ) aroma. To get a perfect cup of tea, add 1-2 teaspoons of tea leaves per 8 oz cup into the teapot. Boil the water, pour it over the tea leaves and let it steep between 2 - 3 minutes. In China, people drink Keemun tea without any kind of sweetener or milk. Keemun tea benefits Keemun tea has many benefits even though it does not contain as many antioxidants as green or white tea. The caffeine in the Keemun tea helps enhancing your memory and gives you energy during the day. Since this tea is a type of black tea, it has many benefits for the human body:
  • Accelerates your metabolism and allows you to burn fat much easier and faster. With a balanced diet and regular exercise,Keemun tea is a strong allied in the process of weight loss.
  • Keemun tea can be a good alternative for coffee. The caffeine in the black tea will give you the energy that you need in the morning and will make you feel full of energy all day long.
  • Improves your digestion by dissolving the excess acidity.
  • Inhibits the growth of cancer cells and the development of rheumatoid arthritis.
Keemun tea side effects Being a black tea, Keemun tea has a significant amount of caffeine which can cause anxiety, insomnia or irritability if you drink it before bed. Pregnant women are not advised to drink black tea during the pregnancy since it has been related to spontaneous abortions and birth defects. Also, if you are breastfeeding you should consider reducing the amount of black tea. People who suffer from anemia are strongly recommended not to drink Keemun tea since it can cause dizziness, blurred vision or headaches. It is often said that Keemun tea has an orchid fragrance that leaves a lasting impression in people`s memory.  It has a reputation for being a truly exquisite tea with its fruity and wine-like flavor that, combined with the wonderful health benefits, make the tea drinking a delightful experience.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Kola Nut Tea has been known for being effective in treating hunger pangs and boosting energy. The kola nut (cola) is native to the rainforests of Africa. The trees can reach up to 60 feet having 30 centimeters long leaves and star shaped fruits. The kola nut contains a huge amount of caffeine and it is used in many West African cultures to suppress hunger pangs. The kola nut is also used as a religious object being offered during prayers, weddings or funerals. It is used to flavor popular cola drinks such as Coca-Cola and Pepsi. The main constituents of kola nut are antioxidants, calcium, potassium, iron, beta-carotene, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, sugar and vitamin C. How To Make Kola Nut tea To brew Kola Nut Tea, place 1-2 teaspoons of kola nut in 8 ounces of water. Boil the mix and then let it steep for about 3-5 minutes. When the time is up, pour the tea into your cup using a strainer to catch the kola nut herbs. Kola Nut Tea Benefits
  • Boosts your mood.
  • Fights depression.
  • Improves male potency.
  • Suppresses food appetite.
  • Helps in the treatment of congestion problems such as asthma and whooping cough.
Kola Nut Tea Side Effects
  • Because of its caffeine content, pregnant and breastfeeding women shouldn’t drink Kola Nut Tea.
  • People with hypertension and heart disease should also avoid Kola Nut Tea.
  • Do not drink Kola Nut Tea before bed, since its caffeine content may stop you from having a restful sleep.
Enjoy Kola Nut Tea and all its wonderful benefits. Just keep in mind that kola nut tea contains caffeine and try to avoid over consumption, in order to not experience its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Lady’s Mantle Tea is a popular tea known especially for its astringent properties. Lady’s Mantle, also known as alchemilla vulgaris, is a perennial herb that grows in North America, Europe and Asia. It has pleated leaves that look like the cloak ladies used to wear during the medieval era. The constituents of lady’s mantle herb are tannins and various flavonoids such as quercetin. How to Make Lady’s Mantle Tea To make Lady’s Mantle Tea you have to infuse 3-4 grams of dried lady’s mantle stems, leaves and flowers, in about 5 ounces of boiling water. Reduce the heat and let the mix stand for 10 minutes. After that, strain and pour the tea into your cup. Lady’s Mantle Tea Benefits
  • Relieves menstrual cramps and discomfort during menopause.
  • When applied on skin, it can heal wounds, cuts, burns or other skin conditions.
  • Helps relieving nausea.
  • Effective in treating diarrhea and gastroenteritis.
  • May heal bleeding gums.
Lady’s Mantle Side Effects
  • Do not drink Lady’s Mantle Tea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Stop drinking Lady’s Mantle tea if you experience weakness or fatigue.
  • It may interact with the effects of some medications, so always consult your doctor before drinking any herbal tea, including Lady’s Mantle Tea.
Lady’s Mantle Tea is a wonderful tea with many benefits for your body and general well-being. Just try not to drink too much of this tea in order to not experience any of its side effects.... Beneficial Teas

Dictionary of Tropical Medicine

First reported in Lassa, in Nigeria, and caused by an arenavirus transmitted by rodents or direct from an infected person. The incubation period is 3–21 days. It is characterised by headache, lethargy and severe muscular pains, and there is often a rash due to bleeding into the skin and mucous membranes. Sore throat is often present. It may carry a high mortality rate, particularly in pregnant women. There is no speci?c treatment, and all that can be done is supportive nursing.... Dictionary of Tropical Medicine

Beneficial Teas

Lemon Balm Tea has been known for many years as being very effective in treating disorders of the central nervous system. Lemon balm (Melissa Officinalis) is a perennial herb in the mint family Lamiaceae, native to Southern Europe and the Mediterranean region. The constituents of lemon balm tea are basically flavonoids and polyphenolics, but there are also many other compounds responsible for the herb`s anti-herpes and thyroid-regulating actions. How To Make Lemon Balm Tea To make Lemon Balm Tea, place 1 teaspoon of dried lemon balm leaves into one cup of boiled water. If you are using fresh leaves, make sure you first wash them to remove dirt and debris. Let the mix steep for about 8-10 minutes depending on how strong you want the flavor to be. Lemon Balm Tea can also be combined with other medicinal plants. For example:
  • Peppermint with lemon balm - to calm stomach ache.
  • Valerian and lemon balm - for insomnia and nerve pain.
  • Bugleweed and lemon balm - for Graves disease.
Lemon Balm Tea Benefits
  • Helps fighting insomnia and sleeping difficulties.
  • Treats nerve pain.
  • Strengthens memory and other brain functions.
  • Mood booster.
  • Alleviates disorders of the digestive tract and gas problems.
  • Helps you concentrate.
  • Used in Europe for treating thyroid and chronic fatigue syndrome.
Lemon Balm Tea Side Effects
  • Over consumption may cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or even dizziness.
  • It’s not safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women to drink Lemon Balm Tea.
  • Lemon Balm Tea may interact with the effects of some medications, especially the ones that are given to you during or after a surgery. That is why you should taking lemon balm at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery!
In conclusion, Lemon Balm Tea can be a very effective natural remedy for many disorders. Just remember not to drink too much lemon balm tea in order not to experience its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Lemon Thyme Tea is popular for treating infections, congestion problems, calming and relaxing the senses.  Lemon thyme (thymus citriodorus) can be recognized by its lace-shaped, light green colored leaves and lemon scent. Due to its aromatic leaves, lemon thyme is used as a flavoring agent for many dishes, especially those involving fish, chicken and vegetables. The constituents of lemon thyme tea include geraniol, esters, nerol, citronellol, citral and thymol. The essential oil that is extracted from the leaves contains a higher level of these constituents than the actual leaves. How To Make Lemon Thyme Tea You can brew Lemon Thyme Tea by placing small dried leaves in a kettle of boiled water. Let the mix steep for about 5-7 minutes. Then, using a strainer to catch the leaves, pour the tea into your cup. Lemon Thyme Tea Benefits
  • Helps fight asthma in children.
  • Prevents infections caused by viruses, fungi or bacteria.
  • Provides relaxation.
  • It can be gargled and used as a deodorizing mouthwash.
  • Facilitates good digestion.
  • Boosts your immune system.
Lemon Thyme Side Effects Like in the case of Lemon Verbena Tea , there are a few side effects that you sould keep in mind when drinking Lemon Thyme Tea:
  • If you suffer from allergies, avoid drinking Lemon Thyme Tea.
  • Do not drink Lemon Thyme Tea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Avoid over-consumption
Lemon Thyme Tea is a wonderful tea with a tasty lemon flavor. Make sure you read the side effects listed above and stay away from them!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Lemon Verbena Tea has been known for many years as being an incredible natural remedy for many disorders, especially the ones in the nervous and digestive systems. Lemon verbena (aloysia tryphilla) is native to South America, mainly in Argentina, Brazil and Peru. The herb can grow up to 1-3 meters and it can be recognized by its lancet shaped green leaves and tiny white or lavender-colored flowers. The constituents of lemon verbena are found in its specific oil which contains methyl heptenone, borneol, geraniol and dipentene. How To Make Lemon Verbena Tea To really experience its health benefits, you can make Lemon VerbenaTea by infusing 2 teaspoons of dried lemon verbena herbs into one cup of boiling water. Let the mix boil for a few minutes and then let it steep for about 5 minutes. Lemon verbena has a strong lemony scent and taste. Add some honey to really enhance its taste! Lemon Verbena Tea Benefits
  • Lemon VerbenaTea strengthens the nervous system.
  • Alleviates colon and stomach spasms.
  • Helps reduce fever.
  • Acts as a cough remedy.
  • Helps with digestion.
  • Calms menstrual cramps.
Lemon Verbena Tea Side Effects
  • Make sure you do not suffer from any allergies, since Lemon Verbena Tea can cause skin irritation in some people.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women must avoid drinking Lemon Verbena Tea and other herbal teas.
  • Drinking large amounts of Lemon Verbena Tea may irritate the kidneys. Avoid drinking this tea if you suffer from kidney stones or any other kidney problems.
Lemon Verbena Tea is a healthy tea with many health benefits. Make sure you keep in mind its side effects and avoid over-consumption!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Lemongrass tea is one of the most popular teas from South Asia. The lemongrass plant grows in India and tropical Asia being commonly used in teas, soups and curries. This plant has been used in medicinal purposes since ancient times due to its wonderful health benefits. How To Make Lemongrass Tea Lemongrass tea has a mild lemon taste with a hint of ginger and a tropical flower scent. You can easily brew your own herbal lemongrass tea by following some few easy steps: First of all you will need a pair of gloves to protect your hands from the leaves of the lemongrass plant because they can cut your skin when you pull them from the parent plant. To cut easier, use a sharp knife. Peel the outer layers of the lemongrass leaves (the dark green leaves surrounding the stalk inside) because they will give the tea a bitter taste if they are used. Then cut the remaining lemongrass plant into slices, about 3 inches long. For each cup you will need 1 tablespoon of lemongrass. Put the slices into the teapot, pour in the hot water and let it steep for about 5 minutes. Then strain the tea into your cup and sweeten it with honey or sugar. Optionally, you can add milk. Lemongrass Tea Benefits If you suffer from insomnia, a cup of lemongrass tea before bed provides you relaxation and a restful sleep. Lemongrass tea is a good aid in digestion, so drinking a cup of tea after a meal removes that full feeling and also, helps remove unhealthy food additives, chemicals and excess fats. Since it acts like a natural diuretic, lemongrass tea helps keep the kidneys and bladder working properly. Also, its powerful antioxidants keep the liver and pancreas healthy. A university study revealed that lemongrass tea may have a cholesterol-lowering effect in people. Another benefit is that lemongrass tea reduces the symptoms of anxiety and nervousness and it has been used in Brazil for centuries to treat nervous disorders. You can also use this tea on a wet rag to heal wounds or other skin problems, since lemongrass tea is known for its anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. Lemongrass Tea Side Effects Despite the fact that it has a lot of health benefits, lemongrass tea also has a few side effects. Make sure you will not drink lemongrass tea if you experience allergy symptoms after consuming lemongrass. It is not indicated for pregnant or breastfeeding women to drink lemongrass tea since it may have different effects on their child. In conclusion, lemongrass tea has a lot of benefits, from its calming effects to skin healing properties. Served hot or iced, this tea makes a wonderful drink during meals or before bed to have calm all night sleep.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Licorice tea has been known for many years due to its medicinal benefits. Licorice herb (glycyrrhiza glabra) grows in Greece, Italy, Spain, Syria, Iraq and Southern China. The root is the one that contains an abundance of valuable properties. The root contains a substance that is as sweet as sugar cane, named glycyrrhizin. How To Make Licorice Tea To brew licorice tea, first of all, cut the licorice root into small pieces. You can buy a whole licorice root from a “natural foods” shop. Then put 1 teaspoon of licorice into 1 cup of boiled water and let it steep for about 5-10 minutes. To really flavor the tea you can add peppermint or cinnamon. Licorice Tea Benefits
  • Speeds the healing of stomach ulcers.
  • Alleviates liver inflammations.
  • Combats diarrhea.
  • Helps treating headaches.
  • Overcomes excessive thirst.
  • Treats sore throat.
Licorice Tea Side Effects If you drink licorice tea excessively, you can be predisposed to some disorders:
  • Hypertension.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Headaches.
  • Low potassium levels in the blood.
  • It may interact with the effects of some medications.
  • It should not be consumed by pregnant or breastfeeding women.
All in al, licorice tea is a healthy option and it can be drank 3 times a day! Just make sure you won`t experience any of its side effects!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Linden Tea has been used in medicine as a natural remedy for various health problems. Linden plant grows mainly in Europe and North America, linden tree having large deep roots and smooth reddish twigs. Linden tea is known for its diuretic, diaphoretic, antispasmodic and sedative properties. The constituents of linden are mucilages, tannins, volatile oils and antioxidants flavonoids. How To Make Linden Tea To brew Linden Tea, you have to infuse a handful of linden flowers and leaves into 250 ml of water. Let the tea steep for about 5-10 minutes and then, using a strainer, pour it into your cup. Be careful! Linden Tea should not be consumed for long periods since over-consumption may lead to heart damage. Also, if you are taking drugs or different supplements, drink Linden Tea 2 hours before taking them so that it cannot interfere with their action. Linden Tea Benefits
  • The most common use of Linden Tea is to treat anxiety since the herb has a relaxing effect on the body.
  • Helps clear up any problems with the digestive system, combating also diarrhea.
  • Alleviates fever, colds and cough.
  • Relieves sore throat.
  • Lessens the effects of excessive flatulence.
  • Helps you to sweat out the toxins from your body.
  • Is a strong helper in fighting different infections.
Linden Tea Side Effects Linden Tea doesn’t have many side effects. But there a few thing that you should keep in mind when drinking linden tea:
  • First of all, avoid over-consumption. Drinking too much linden tea can be harmful rather than helpful.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should not drink linden tea.
  • Frequent use of linden tea has been linked with heart problems, so if you are experiencing heart diseases make sure you always consult your doctor before taking any herbal teas or supplements.
In conclusion, Linden Tea is a healthy tea with a lot of benefits for your body. In order not to experience its (very few) side effects, avoid drinking too much linden tea!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A rare disease, although the causal organism, Listeria monocytogenes, is widely distributed in soil, silage, water, and various animals, with consequent risk of food contamination – for example, from unpasteurised soft cheese. Neonates are mainly a?ected – often as a result of a mild or inapparent infection in the pregnant mother. The disease presents in two main forms: MENINGOENCEPHALITIS, or SEPTICAEMIA with enlarged LYMPH glands. Elderly adults occasionally develop the ?rst form, while younger adults are more likely to develop a mild or even inapparent form. The disease is treated with ANTIBIOTICS such as ampicillin (see PENICILLIN) or CHLORAMPHENICOL.... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

ACUTE LIVER DISEASE The hepatitis viruses (A– F) are of paramount importance. Hepatitis E (HEV) often produces acute hepatic failure in pregnant women; extensive epidemics – transmitted by contaminated drinking-water supplies – have been documented. HBV, especially in association with HDV, also causes acute liver failure in infected patients in several tropical countries: however, the major importance of HBV is that the infection leads to chronic liver disease (see below). Other hepatotoxic viruses include the EPSTEIN BARR VIRUS, CYTOMEGALOVIRUS (CMV), the ?avivirus causing YELLOW FEVER, Marburg/Ebola viruses, etc. Acute liver disease also occurs in the presence of several acute bacterial infections, including Salmonella typhi, brucellosis, leptospirosis, syphilis, etc. The complex type of jaundice associated with acute systemic bacterial infection – especially pneumococcal PNEUMONIA and pyomiositis – assumes a major importance in many tropical countries, especially those in Africa and in Papua New Guinea. Of protozoan infections, plasmodium falciparum malaria, LEISHMANIASIS, and TOXOPLASMOSIS should be considered. Ascaris lumbricoides (the roundworm) can produce obstruction to the biliary system. CHRONIC LIVER DISEASE Long-term disease is dominated by sequelae of HBV and HCV infections (often acquired during the neonatal period), both of which can cause chronic active hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (‘hepatoma’) – one of the world’s most common malignancies. Chronic liver disease is also caused by SCHISTOSOMIASIS (usually Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum), and acute and chronic alcohol ingestion. Furthermore, many local herbal remedies and also orthodox chemotherapeutic compounds (e.g. those used in tuberculosis and leprosy) can result in chronic liver disease. HAEMOSIDEROSIS is a major problem in southern Africa. Hepatocytes contain excessive iron – derived primarily from an excessive intake, often present in locally brewed beer; however, a genetic predisposition seems likely. Indian childhood cirrhosis – associated with an excess of copper – is a major problem in India and surrounding countries. Epidemiological evidence shows that much of the copper is derived from copper vessels used to store milk after weaning. Veno-occlusive disease was ?rst described in Jamaica and is caused by pyrrolyzidine alkaloids (present in bush-tea). Several HIV-associated ‘opportunistic’ infections can give rise to hepatic disease (see AIDS/HIV).

A localised (focal) form of liver disease in all tropical/subtropical countries results from invasive Entamoeba histolytica infection (amoebic liver ‘abscess’); serology and imaging techniques assist in diagnosis. Hydatidosis also causes localised liver disease; one or more cysts usually involve the right lobe of the liver. Serological tests and imaging techniques are of value in diagnosis. Whilst surgery formerly constituted the sole method of management, prolonged courses of albendazole and/or praziquantel have now been shown to be e?ective; however, surgical intervention is still required in some cases.

Hepato-biliary disease is also a problem in many tropical/subtropical countries. In southeast Asia, Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverini infections cause chronic biliary-tract infection, complicated by adenocarcinoma of the biliary system. Praziquantel is e?ective chemotherapy before advanced disease ensues. Fasciola hepatica (the liver ?uke) is a further hepato-biliary helminthic infection; treatment is with bithionol or triclabendazole, praziquantel being relatively ine?ective.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Lobelia tea is known for many years as being very effective for respiratory and viral disorders. Lobelia, also known as Indian Tobacco, is a flowering plant that can grow up to two feet tall. Its leaves have a yellow or light green color, violet spiky flowers and oval-shaped fruits. The constituents of lobelia are alkaloids, resins, lipids and gums, constituents that help relax the muscles and reduce a person’s craving for nicotine. How To Make Lobelia Tea Lobelia tea can be made by infusing ½ teaspoon of dried lobelia leaves in boiling water. Let the mix steep for about 10-15 minutes and when the time is up, pout the tea into your cup using a strainer to catch the leaves. Tea drinkers suggest that you should combine lobelia tea with another herbal tea to really enhance the flavor. But this depends on what you prefer. Lobelia Tea Benefits
  • Lobelia Tea has been used for many years to beak the smoking habit and it is often used in many smoking cessation programs.
  • Provides relaxation, easing tension and panic.
  • Treats asthma and bronchitis. It is said that Native Americans used to smoke lobelia to treat these conditions.
  • Clears toxins from your body, lobelia tea being able to induce vomiting.
  • Have anti-spasmodic, diuretic and sedative properties.
Lobelia Tea Side Effects
  • People who experience certain health conditions such as heart, liver or kidney disease, high blood pressure, seizure disorders, paralysis, shortness of breath should not drink Lobelia Tea.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should not drink Lobelia Tea.
  • Lobelia Tea may interfere with the effects of certain medications, such as psychiatric medications or nicotine substitutes, so do not drink lobelia tea before consulting your doctor!
Lobelia Tea is a healty herbal tea, having a lot of benefits for your body. Try not to drink more than 3-4 cups per day of Lobelia Tea and make sure you won’t experience any of the side effects listed above!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Lotus tea is a Vietnamese green tea and has been often associated with purity and serenity in Hindu and Buddhist literature. The lotus plant is a pink aquatic flower with a unique circular seed pod that is collected during late summer after the seeds have matured. The constituents of the lotus plant are lotusine, demethyl coclaurine, neferin and nuciferine. How To Make Lotus Tea Lotus is very effective in the tea form, since this way is digested much faster than pills or other supplements. To make lotus tea, you only need to infuse 2 teaspoons of dried lotus flower and leaves in 500 ml of boiled water. Let it steep for about 5 minutes, then, using a strainer to catch the lotus flowers, pour the tea into your cup and enjoy! Lotus Tea Benefits Lotus tea has been recognized worldwide for its diuretic, astringent and cooling properties. Other health benefits attributed to lotus tea are:
  • It is very effective in treating intestinal problems such as diarrhea and abdominal cramps.
  • Controls bleeding due to the quercetin and other flavonoids in the lotus plant.
  • Lotus leaf tea has a general calming effect, providing relaxation.
  • Helps fighting gastric ulcers and combating hemorrhoids.
  • Lotus tea alleviates restlessness and insomnia.
Lotus Tea Side Effects Lotus tea doesn’t have any particular side effects, but since it is a green tea there may be some things that you should keep in mind. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, avoid drinking lotus tea or any other type of green tea. Do not drink this tea if you suffer from anemia, diabetes or liver disease. Also, if you are taking medication, green tea including lotus tea, can inhibit their effect. In this case, if you really want to drink lotus tea, consume it 2 hours after taking your medications. In the end, avoid over consumption. Drinking too much lotus tea can be dangerous especially if the tea is low quality!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Lovage Tea is known for its diuretic, antiseptic and antimicrobial properties. Lovage is a perennial aromatic flowering plant that grows in the northern and central parts of the United States. The constituents of lovage tea are quercetin, a flavonoid used as a nutritional supplement for people who struggle with fighting cancer, coumarins, beta-sitosterol, gums and resins. How To Make Lovage Tea To brew Lovage Tea, you will need to infuse about 2 teaspoons of dried lovage herb in a cup of boiled water. Let the mix steep for about 7 minutes and then, using a strainer, pour it into your cup. Lovage Tea Benefits
  • Alleviates menstrual cramps.
  • Helps in the treatment of rheumatism.
  • Treats urinary tract infections.
  • Stimulates food appetite.
  • Improves blood circulation.
  • Alleviates migraine headache.
  • Alleviates gas pains and flatulence.
Lovage Tea Side Effects
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Lovage Tea since during pregnancy may cause contractions or even miscarriage.
  • Lovage Tea may lead to fluid retention.
  • Might increase blood pressure.
  • Do not drink Lovage Tea if you have kidney problems.
As you can see, lovage tea is a wonderful tea with many health benefits. Just read the side effects listed above and make sure you won`t experience them!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A group of ANTIBIOTICS. The original macrolide, ERYTHROMYCIN, was discovered in the early 1950s and used successfully as an alternative to PENICILLIN. The name ‘macrolide’ derives from the molecular structure of this group, three others of which are clarithromycin, azithromycin and spiramycin. Macrolides check PROTEIN synthesis in BACTERIA and the latest ones are, like erythromycin, active against several bacterial species including gram-positive COCCI and rods. In addition, they act against Haemophilus in?uenzae. Clarithromycin is potent against Helicobacter pylori; azithromycin is e?ective against infections caused by Legionella spp. (see LEGIONNAIRE’S DISEASE) and GONOCOCCI. Spiramycin is a restricted-use macrolide prescribed for pregnant patients with TOXOPLASMOSIS.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Mango tea is a complex type of tea, due to its ingredients: green tea, black tea and mango pieces. It is considered to be ideal both for tea consumers and fruit lovers worldwide. About Mango Tea Mango, originally coming fromsouth Asia, was brought to the United States in 1880. It symbolizes love and apparently, its leaves are a good choice to be gifted at weddings. It is a delicious and juicy fruit, that can be eaten fresh or cooked, sliced, pureed or, as part of several beverages. Mango tea is a type of tea resulting from mixing green tea, black tea and whole mango pieces. It gathers the freshness of mangoes and the strong flavor of the two teas mentioned above. How to make Mango Tea?
  • infuse 1 tablespoon per cup
  • use boiling water
  • infuse it for 3 minutes
Mango tea can be also consumed cold. In this case, ice is recommended to be added. To boost its freshness, connoisseurs indicate the use of fresh mint leaves use. Mango Tea benefits Owing to the high quantity of contained antioxidants, Mango tea is effectively used in treating cancer and helping cells to recover from this disease. This type of tea has proven its efficiency in dealing with:
  •  Anemia
  •  Stress
  • Muscle cramps
  • Digestion
  • Weight Control
  • Bone Growth
  • Immune Functions
  • Vision
  • Wound Healing
  • Protein Synthesis
  • Dehydration
Mango Tea side effects Mango tea side effects are generallyassociated to overconsumption or, citrus intolerance. It is indicated that individuals suffering from cardiac problems or hypertension to consume it moderately. Pregnant and breast-feeding women are advised to reduce the amount of Mango tea consumed (less than 2 cups per day), in order not to cause agitation to the baby. Mango teacould be successfully introduced in a daily diet, providing energy and enhancing mood for consumers of all ages and thus, carefully strengthening the immune system.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Marshmallow tea has been acknowledged by ancient civilizations for its diuretic, emollient and expectorant properties. Marshmallow plant (althaea officinalis) is an aromatic herb that grows in damp and wet areas of Europe, Africa and western Asia.  Its leaves are palmately lobed, having 3-7 lobes. The flowers of the marshmallow plant are colored white, red or purple. The chemical constituents of marshmallow root are mucilage, asparagines, flanovoids, tannins, quercetins and sugars. The ones of the marshmallow leaves are mucilage, tannins, phenolic acid and volatile oils. How To Make Marshmallow Tea There are a couple of ways to prepare marshmallow tea. For example: To make marshmallow leaf tea, put 1-2 teaspoons of dried marshmallow leaves or 2-3 tablespoons of fresh leaves in boiling water and let it steep for about 10-15 minutes. Then pout the tea into your cup using a strainer to catch the leaves. To make marshmallow root tea, boil one teaspoon of dried, crumbled root for about 15 minutes. Then strain out the marshmallow root into a cup. It is recommended to drink no more than 3 cups of marshmallow tea per day. Marshmallow Tea Benefits Marshmallow leaf tea may help in the treatment of urethritis, can aid flushing out kidney stones, may help relieve sore throat and ease mouth inflammations and soothe the bronchial tubes. Marshmallow root tea has the following benefits:
  • It is used for thousands of years as an herbal remedy for sore throat, cough and other respiratory problems due to its large amounts of mucilage.
  • It is a strong allied in the weight loss process since it can give you the feeling of fullness.
  • It is helpful in treating almost all problems related to inflammation of the digestive tract.
  • It can be formed into a mouthwash for treating teeth or gum inflammation. Fresh peeled root is also good for children to chew on in order to have healthy teeth.
Marshmallow Tea Side Effects Marshmallow tea is considered being completely safe having very low levels of toxicity. Still, there are some side effects that this tea can have:
  • Drink this tea with caution if you suffer from diabetes or liver disease since marshmallow tea may include the use of sugar or alcohol.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should not drink marshmallow tea.
  • Keep in mind that if you are taking medications, marshmallow tea can interfere with their absorption. So drink the tea at least two hours after taking the drugs.
As you can see, marshmallow tea has more benefits than side effects. Enjoy it and remember not to drink more then 3 cups of marshmallow tea per day!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

An aminosalicylate drug used for the treatment of mild to moderate ULCERATIVE COLITIS and the maintenance of remission. It should be used with caution by pregnant women.... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

An antimicrobial drug particularly active against anaerobic (see ANAEROBE) bacteria and PROTOZOA. Given by mouth, by rectum or intravenously, it is used to treat infections of the urinary, genital, and digestive systems – for example, TRICHOMONIASIS, amoebiasis (see DYSENTERY), GIARDIASIS, and acute ulcerative GINGIVITIS, and is a useful treatment for dental abscesses. Topically, it is used in the management of ROSACEA and it reduces the odour produced by anaerobic bacteria in fungating tumours.

It may cause a DISULFIRAM-like reaction with alcohol; caution is similarly indicated in patients with impaired liver function or hepatic encephalopathy, and who are pregnant or breast feeding. Rare side-e?ects include nausea, vomiting, unpleasant taste, furred tongue and gastrointestinal disturbances; rashes, URTICARIA, and angio-oedema (see under URTICARIA); drowsiness, headache, dizziness, ATAXIA and ANAPHYLAXIS.... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

A PROSTAGLANDIN analogue used to treat duodenal and gastric ulcers, and those induced by NON-STEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS (NSAIDS). It should not be taken by pregnant or breast-feeding women.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Mugwort tea is one of the many herbal teas that have many health benefits. Despite its bitter, tangy taste, it’s worth a try to drink some mugwort tea, as it’s good for your body. Find out more about the tea’s health benefits in this article. About Mugwort Tea Mugwort tea is a type of herbal tea made from mugwort dried leaves. The mugwort is an herbaceous perennial plant with a woody root; it can grow up to 2 meters tall. The stem is reddish in color, with dark green, pinnate leaves that are 5-20 cm long, and radially symmetrical small flowers which have many yellow or dark red petals. It grows in Europe, Asia, northern Africa, Alaska and North America; it is often considered an invasive weed. It is sometimes referred to by the following names: felon herb, chrysanthemum weed, wild wormwood, old Uncle Henry, sailor’s tobacco, or St. John’s plant (be careful not to confuse it with St. John’s wort). The leaves and buds of the plant are best picked right before the flowers of the plant bloom, between July and September. They can be used with season fat, meat and fish, to give them a bitter flavor. Native American legends say that mugwort leaves were rubbed all over one’s body in order to keep ghosts away, as well as to prevent one from dreaming about the dead. Nowadays, it is mixed with other herbs (chamomile, peppermint) to make the so-called “dream tea”, which helps you improve dream recall, and increases the number of dreams you have per night. Components of Mugwort Tea Mugwort, which is the main ingredient of the mugwort tea, has plenty of components that are good for our health. Some of them are essential oils (such as cineole/wormwood oil, and thujone), flavonoids, triterpenes, coumarin derivatives, tannins, and linalool. Thujone consumed in large amounts can be toxic. In many countries, the amount of thujone which can be added in food or drink products is regulated. The amount of thujone oil found in the plant is considered safe. How to make Mugwort Tea In order to enjoy a cup of mugwort tea, add one teaspoon of the dried mugwort herb to a cup of boiling water. Let it steep for about 10 minutes before removing the dried plants. It is recommended that you drink the mugwort tea in mouthful doses throughout the whole day. If the mugwort tea is too bitter for your taste, you can add honey or sugar to sweeten it. Mugwort Tea Benefits Thanks to the many components of mugwort, the mugwort tea is full of health benefits. Mugwort tea is useful when it comes to having a good digestion. It stimulates the secretion of gastric juices, relieves flatulence and bloating, and helps in the treatment for intestinal worms. It also improves your appetite, and helps with indigestion, colic, and travel sickness. This tea might help in the treatment of various brain diseases. It is also a useful remedy when it comes to nervousness, exhaustion, depression, and insomnia. Mugwort tea is also useful during child birth. It has a calming effect when you are during labor, and it also lessens contraction pains. It is also useful when you get menstrual cramps, and stimulates irregular or suppressed menstruation. Considering the diuretic properties of mugwort, it is believed that mugwort tea can help with liver, spleen, and kidney problems. It is also recommended that you drink this type of tea if you’ve got a cold, a fever, or if you’re suffering from asthma or bronchitis. Mugwort Tea side effects Although mugwort tea contains little amount of thujone oil, it is recommended that you don’t drink if you’re pregnant. It might cause miscarriages. Consumed in large quantities, the thujone oil found in the composition of this tea may lead to side effects such as anxiety and sleeplessness. When drinking mugwort tea, be careful not to have an allergic reaction. You might be allergic to mugwort if you know you’re allergic to plants from the Asteraceae or Compositae family. These include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, chamomile, and many other plants. Also, avoid drinking this tea if you know you’re allergic to birch, celery, wild carrot, honey, royal jelly, cabbage, hazelnut, olive pollen, kiwi, peach, mango, apple, mustard, and sunflower. Don’t drink more than six cups of mugwort tea - or any other type of tea - a day. If you drink too much, it’ll end up doing more harm. The symptoms you might experience are headaches, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, insomnia, dizziness, and irregular heartbeats.   Despite its bitter taste, mugwort tea is definitely good for your body. It has lots of health benefits, but first make sure you’re not affected by any of its side effects. Once you’re sure it’s safe, you can enjoy a cup of this  delicious tea.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A pregnant woman who has had more than one pregnancy.... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

One of the ANABOLIC STEROIDS, with the property of building PROTEIN. It is of little value in medical care, although is licensed for use in aplastic ANAEMIA; it has also been used in the past to treat osteoporosis in women (see under BONE, DISORDERS OF), but is no longer recommended for this purpose. Its use as a bodybuilder by some athletes and others has caused controversy: those found using it are barred from most recognised athletic events. Nandrolone should never be taken by pregnant women or by people with liver disease or prostate cancer. Side-e?ects include ACNE; VIRILISATION with high doses including voice changes, cessation of periods, and inhibition of sperm production; and liver tumours after prolonged use.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Neem tea is a refreshing herbal tea, with origins in South Asia. Despite its bitter taste, it is often recommended as a beverage thanks to its many health benefits. Read this article to find out more about neem tea! About Neem Tea Neem tea is made from the leaves of the Neem tree. The tree can be found in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan. It is an evergreen tree which can grow up to twenty feet in just three years, and it starts bearing fruit after 3-5 years. However, during periods of severe drought, it may shed most or even all of its leaves. The green leaves are 20-40cm long, with medium to dark green leaflets about 3-8cm long; the terminal leaflet is usually missing. The tree’s flowers are small, white and fragrant, arranged axillary. The fruit has an olive-like form, with a thin skin and a yellow-white, fibrous and bittersweet pulp. How to prepare Neem Tea To brew a cup of neem tea, you have to follow a few simple steps. First, boil the necessary amount of water. Then, pour it over a cup with includes a few neem leaves. Let it steep for about 5 minutes. Lastly, remove the leaves and, if you think it is needed, flavor it with honey and/or lemon. You can make your own stack of neem leaves for neem tea. If you’ve got neem trees around, gather leaves and leave them to dry. You can use fresh neem leaves, as well. In both cases though, you have to wash the leaves well before you use them. Once you’ve got the leaves ready, whether dry or fresh, just follow the earlier-mentioned steps. You can also make a cup of neem tea by using powdered neem leaf. Neem Tea Benefits Neem leaves have many antibacterial and antiviral properties. Thanks to this, neem tea is full of health benefits. Indians chew on neem twigs to have a good oral hygiene. However, a cup of neem tea can also help you maintain a good oral hygiene. It is useful in treating bad breath and gum disease, and it fights against cavities. Neem tea is also useful in treating fungal infections, such as yeast infections, jock itch, thrush, and ringworm. Neem tea can help you treat both indigestion and constipation. It is also useful when it comes to reducing swelling of the stomach and intestinal tract, and it can be used to counter ulcers and gout. Neem tea, when combined with neem cream, has anti-viral uses. It can help speed up the healing time and pain associated with herpes simplex 1, herpes zoster and warts. Neem tea is also used in the treatment of malaria and other similar diseases. It helps purify and cleanse the blood, as well; therefore, it increases liver function. Other important benefits that are related to consumption of neem tea are: treating pneumonia, treating diabetes, treating hypertension and heart diseases. Also, neem tea doesn’t have to be used only as a beverage. Because of its anti-parasitic use, you can bathe in it. This way, the tea acts as an antiseptic, killing the parasites. Neem Tea Side Effects While we can say that neem tea has plenty of important health benefits, don’t forget that there are a few side effects, as well. First of all, neem oil can be incredibly toxic for infants. Even a small amount of neem oil can cause death. Check to see if the neem tea you drink has neem oil among its ingredients. Or, just to be on the safe side, don’t give infants neem tea to drink. You shouldn’t drink neem tea if you have a history of stomach, liver or kidney problems. Some of its active ingredients can cause you harm in this case. Although rare, neem tea can also lead to allergic reactions. Symptoms in this case include difficulty in breathing, rashes, itching, or swelling of the throat or mouth. If you get any of these, stop drinking neem teaand contact your doctor. Drinking neem tea is a big no if you’re trying to conceive, or you’re already pregnant. In the first case, neem tea can work as a contraceptive, therefore lessening the chances of you getting pregnant. In the second case, consumption of neem tea can lead to miscarriages. Also, don’t drink more than six cups of neem teaa day - or any other type of tea. It won’t do you well, despite its many health benefits. Some of the symptoms you might get are: headaches, dizziness, insomnia, irregular heartbeats, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. If you get any of these symptoms, reduce the amount of neem tea you drink. As a herbal tea, neem tea is definitely good for your health. Still, despite its many health benefits, there are a few side effects as well. Keep them both in mind when drinking neem tea.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

Occupational health The e?ect of work on human health, and the impact of workers’ health on their work. Although the term encompasses the identi?cation and treatment of speci?c occupational diseases, occupational health is also an applied and multidisciplinary subject concerned with the prevention of occupational ill-health caused by chemical, biological, physical and psychosocial factors, and the promotion of a healthy and productive workforce.

Occupational health includes both mental and physical health. It is about compliance with health-and-safety-at-work legislation (and common law duties) and about best practice in providing work environments that reduce risks to health and safety to lowest practicable levels. It includes workers’ ?tness to work, as well as the management of the work environment to accommodate people with disabilities, and procedures to facilitate the return to work of those absent with long-term illness. Occupational health incorporates several professional groups, including occupational physicians, occupational health nurses, occupational hygienists, ergonomists, disability managers, workplace counsellors, health-and-safety practitioners, and workplace physiotherapists.

In the UK, two key statutes provide a framework for occupational health: the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974 (HSW Act); and the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (DDA). The HSW Act states that employers have a duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees and to conduct their business in a way that does not expose others to risks to their health and safety. Employees and self-employed people also have duties under the Act. Modern health-and-safety legislation focuses on assessing and controlling risk rather than prescribing speci?c actions in di?erent industrial settings. Various regulations made under the HSW Act, such as the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations, the Manual Handling Operations Regulations and the Noise at Work Regulations, set out duties with regard to di?erent risks, but apply to all employers and follow the general principles of risk assessment and control. Risks should be controlled principally by removing or reducing the hazard at source (for example, by substituting chemicals with safer alternatives, replacing noisy machinery, or automating tasks to avoid heavy lifting). Personal protective equipment, such as gloves and ear defenders, should be seen as a last line of defence after other control measures have been put in place.

The employment provisions of the DDA require employers to avoid discriminatory practice towards disabled people and to make reasonable adjustments to working arrangements where a disabled person is placed at a substantial disadvantage to a non-disabled person. Although the DDA does not require employers to provide access to rehabilitation services – even for those injured or made ill at work – occupational-health practitioners may become involved in programmes to help people get back to work after injury or long-term illness, and many businesses see the retention of valuable sta? as an attractive alternative to medical retirement or dismissal on health grounds.

Although a major part of occupational-health practice is concerned with statutory compliance, the workplace is also an important venue for health promotion. Many working people rarely see their general practitioner and, even when they do, there is little time to discuss wider health issues. Occupational-health advisers can ?ll in this gap by providing, for example, workplace initiatives on stopping smoking, cardiovascular health, diet and self-examination for breast and testicular cancers. Such initiatives are encouraged because of the perceived bene?ts to sta?, to the employing organisation and to the wider public-health agenda. Occupational psychologists recognise the need for the working population to achieve a ‘work-life balance’ and the promotion of this is an increasing part of occupational health strategies.

The law requires employers to consult with their sta? on health-and-safety matters. However, there is also a growing understanding that successful occupational-health management involves workers directly in the identi?cation of risks and in developing solutions in the workplace. Trade unions play an active role in promoting occupational health through local and national campaigns and by training and advising elected workplace safety representatives.

Occupational medicine The branch of medicine that deals with the control, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and management of ill-health and injuries caused or made worse by work, and with ensuring that workers are ?t for the work they do.

Occupational medicine includes: statutory surveillance of workers’ exposure to hazardous agents; advice to employers and employees on eliminating or reducing risks to health and safety at work; diagnosis and treatment/management of occupational illness; advice on adapting the working environment to suit the worker, particularly those with disabilities or long-term health problems; and advice on the return to work and, if necessary, rehabilitation of workers absent through illness. Occupational physicians may play a wider role in monitoring the health of workplace populations and in advising employers on controlling health hazards where ill-health trends are observed. They may also conduct epidemiological research (see EPIDEMIOLOGY) on workplace diseases.

Because of the occupational physician’s dual role as adviser to both employer and employee, he or she is required to be particularly diligent with regards to the individual worker’s medical CONFIDENTIALITY. Occupational physicians need to recognise in any given situation the context they are working in, and to make sure that all parties are aware of this.

Occupational medicine is a medical discipline and thus is only part of the broader ?eld of occupational health. Although there are some speci?c clinical duties associated with occupational medicine, such as diagnosis of occupational disease and medical screening, occupational physicians are frequently part of a multidisciplinary team that might include, for example, occupational-health nurses, healthand-safety advisers, ergonomists, counsellors and hygienists. Occupational physicians are medical practitioners with a post-registration quali?cation in occupational medicine. They will have completed a period of supervised in-post training. In the UK, the Faculty of Occupational Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians has three categories of membership, depending on quali?cations and experience: associateship (AFOM); membership (MFOM); and fellowship (FFOM).

Occupational diseases Occupational diseases are illnesses that are caused or made worse by work. In their widest sense, they include physical and mental ill-health conditions.

In diagnosing an occupational disease, the clinician will need to examine not just the signs and symptoms of ill-health, but also the occupational history of the patient. This is important not only in discovering the cause, or causes, of the disease (work may be one of a number of factors), but also in making recommendations on how the work should be modi?ed to prevent a recurrence – or, if necessary, in deciding whether or not the worker is able to return to that type of work. The occupational history will help in deciding whether or not other workers are also at risk of developing the condition. It will include information on:

the nature of the work.

how the tasks are performed in practice.

the likelihood of exposure to hazardous agents (physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial).

what control measures are in place and the extent to which these are adhered to.

previous occupational and non-occupational exposures.

whether or not others have reported similar symptoms in relation to the work. Some conditions – certain skin conditions,

for example – may show a close relationship to work, with symptoms appearing directly only after exposure to particular agents or possibly disappearing at weekends or with time away from work. Others, however, may be chronic and can have serious long-term implications for a person’s future health and employment.

Statistical information on the prevalence of occupational disease in the UK comes from a variety of sources, including o?cial ?gures from the Industrial Injuries Scheme (see below) and statutory reporting of occupational disease (also below). Neither of these o?cial schemes provides a representative picture, because the former is restricted to certain prescribed conditions and occupations, and the latter su?ers from gross under-reporting. More useful are data from the various schemes that make up the Occupational Diseases Intelligence Network (ODIN) and from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). ODIN data is generated by the systematic reporting of work-related conditions by clinicians and includes several schemes. Under one scheme, more than 80 per cent of all reported diseases by occupational-health physicians fall into just six of the 42 clinical disease categories: upper-limb disorders; anxiety, depression and stress disorders; contact DERMATITIS; lower-back problems; hearing loss (see DEAFNESS); and ASTHMA. Information from the LFS yields a similar pattern in terms of disease frequency. Its most recent survey found that over 2 million people believed that, in the previous 12 months, they had su?ered from an illness caused or made worse by work and that

19.5 million working days were lost as a result. The ten most frequently reported disease categories were:

stress and mental ill-health (see MENTAL ILLNESS): 515,000 cases.

back injuries: 508,000.

upper-limb and neck disorders: 375,000.

lower respiratory disease: 202,000.

deafness, TINNITUS or other ear conditions: 170,000.

lower-limb musculoskeletal conditions: 100,000.

skin disease: 66,000.

headache or ‘eyestrain’: 50,000.

traumatic injury (includes wounds and fractures from violent attacks at work): 34,000.

vibration white ?nger (hand-arm vibration syndrome): 36,000. A person who develops a chronic occu

pational disease may be able to sue his or her employer for damages if it can be shown that the employer was negligent in failing to take reasonable care of its employees, or had failed to provide a system of work that would have prevented harmful exposure to a known health hazard. There have been numerous successful claims (either awarded in court, or settled out of court) for damages for back and other musculoskeletal injuries, hand-arm vibration syndrome, noise-induced deafness, asthma, dermatitis, MESOTHELIOMA and ASBESTOSIS. Employers’ liability (workers’ compensation) insurers are predicting that the biggest future rise in damages claims will be for stress-related illness. In a recent study, funded by the Health and Safety Executive, about 20 per cent of all workers – more than 5 million people in the UK – claimed to be ‘very’ or ‘extremely’ stressed at work – a statistic that is likely to have a major impact on the long-term health of the working population.

While victims of occupational disease have the right to sue their employers for damages, many countries also operate a system of no-fault compensation for the victims of prescribed occupational diseases. In the UK, more than 60 diseases are prescribed under the Industrial Injuries Scheme and a person will automatically be entitled to state compensation for disability connected to one of these conditions, provided that he or she works in one of the occupations for which they are prescribed. The following short list gives an indication of the types of diseases and occupations prescribed under the scheme:

CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME connected to the use of hand-held vibrating tools.

hearing loss from (amongst others) use of pneumatic percussive tools and chainsaws, working in the vicinity of textile manufacturing or woodworking machines, and work in ships’ engine rooms.

LEPTOSPIROSIS – infection with Leptospira (various listed occupations).

viral HEPATITIS from contact with human blood, blood products or other sources of viral hepatitis.

LEAD POISONING, from any occupation causing exposure to fumes, dust and vapour from lead or lead products.

asthma caused by exposure to, among other listed substances, isocyanates, curing agents, solder ?ux fumes and insects reared for research.

mesothelioma from exposure to asbestos.

In the UK, employers and the self-employed have a duty to report all occupational injuries (if the employee is o? work for three days or more as a result), diseases or dangerous incidents to the relevant enforcing authority (the Health and Safety Executive or local-authority environmental-health department) under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR). Despite this statutory duty, comparatively few diseases are reported so that ?gures generated from RIDDOR reports do not give a useful indication of the scale of occupational diseases in the UK. The statutory reporting of injuries is much better, presumably because of the clear and acute relationship between a workplace accident and the resultant injury. More than 160,000 injuries are reported under RIDDOR every year compared with just 2,500 or so occupational diseases, a gross underestimate of the true ?gure.

There are no precise ?gures for the number of people who die prematurely because of work-related ill-health, and it would be impossible to gauge the exact contribution that work has on, for example, cardiovascular disease and cancers where the causes are multifactorial. The toll would, however, dwarf the number of deaths caused by accidents at work. Around 250 people are killed by accidents at work in the UK each year – mesothelioma, from exposure to asbestos at work, alone kills more than 1,300 people annually.

The following is a sample list of occupational diseases, with brief descriptions of their aetiologies.

Inhaled materials

PNEUMOCONIOSIS covers a group of diseases which cause ?brotic lung disease following the inhalation of dust. Around 250–300 new cases receive bene?t each year – mostly due to coal dust with or without silica contamination. SILICOSIS is the more severe disease. The contraction in the size of the coal-mining industry as well as improved dust suppression in the mines have diminished the importance of this disease, whereas asbestos-related diseases now exceed 1,000 per year. Asbestos ?bres cause a restrictive lung disease but also are responsible for certain malignant conditions such as pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma and lung cancer. The lung-cancer risk is exacerbated by cigarette-smoking.

Even though the use of asbestos is virtually banned in the UK, many workers remain at risk of exposure because of the vast quantities present in buildings (much of which is not listed in building plans). Carpenters, electricians, plumbers, builders and demolition workers are all liable to exposure from work that disturbs existing asbestos. OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA is of increasing importance – not only because of the recognition of new allergic agents (see ALLERGY), but also in the number of reported cases. The following eight substances are most frequently linked to occupational asthma (key occupations in brackets): isocyanates (spray painters, electrical processors); ?our and grain (bakers and farmers); wood dust (wood workers); glutaraldehyde (nurses, darkroom technicians); solder/colophony (welders, electronic assembly workers); laboratory animals (technicians, scientists); resins and glues (metal and electrical workers, construction, chemical processors); and latex (nurses, auxiliaries, laboratory technicians).

The disease develops after a short, symptomless period of exposure; symptoms are temporally related to work exposures and relieved by absences from work. Removal of the worker from exposure does not necessarily lead to complete cessation of symptoms. For many agents, there is no relationship with a previous history of ATOPY. Occupational asthma accounts for about 10 per cent of all asthma cases. DERMATITIS The risk of dermatitis caused by an allergic or irritant reaction to substances used or handled at work is present in a wide variety of jobs. About three-quarters of cases are irritant contact dermatitis due to such agents as acids, alkalis and solvents. Allergic contact dermatitis is a more speci?c response by susceptible individuals to a range of allergens (see ALLERGEN). The main occupational contact allergens include chromates, nickel, epoxy resins, rubber additives, germicidal agents, dyes, topical anaesthetics and antibiotics as well as certain plants and woods. Latex gloves are a particular cause of occupational dermatitis among health-care and laboratory sta? and have resulted in many workers being forced to leave their profession through ill-health. (See also SKIN, DISEASES OF.)

Musculoskeletal disorders Musculoskeletal injuries are by far the most common conditions related to work (see LFS ?gures, above) and the biggest cause of disability. Although not all work-related, musculoskeletal disorders account for 36.5 per cent of all disabilities among working-age people (compared with less than 4 per cent for sight and hearing impairment). Back pain (all causes – see BACKACHE) has been estimated to cause more than 50 million days lost every year in sickness absence and costs the UK economy up to £5 billion annually as a result of incapacity or disability. Back pain is a particular problem in the health-care sector because of the risk of injury from lifting and moving patients. While the emphasis should be on preventing injuries from occurring, it is now well established that the best way to manage most lower-back injuries is to encourage the patient to continue as normally as possible and to remain at work, or to return as soon as possible even if the patient has some residual back pain. Those who remain o? work on long-term sick leave are far less likely ever to return to work.

Aside from back injuries, there are a whole range of conditions a?ecting the upper limbs, neck and lower limbs. Some have clear aetiologies and clinical signs, while others are less well de?ned and have multiple causation. Some conditions, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, are prescribed diseases in certain occupations; however, they are not always caused by work (pregnant and older women are more likely to report carpal tunnel syndrome irrespective of work) and clinicians need to be careful when assigning work as the cause without ?rst considering the evidence. Other conditions may be revealed or made worse by work – such as OSTEOARTHRITIS in the hand. Much attention has focused on injuries caused by repeated movement, excessive force, and awkward postures and these include tenosynovitis (in?ammation of a tendon) and epicondylitis. The greatest controversy surrounds upper-limb disorders that do not present obvious tissue or nerve damage but nevertheless give signi?cant pain and discomfort to the individual. These are sometimes referred to as ‘repetitive strain injury’ or ‘di?use RSI’. The diagnosis of such conditions is controversial, making it di?cult for su?erers to pursue claims for compensation through the courts. Psychosocial factors, such as high demands of the job, lack of control and poor social support at work, have been implicated in the development of many upper-limb disorders, and in prevention and management it is important to deal with the psychological as well as the physical risk factors. Occupations known to be at particular risk of work-related upper-limb disorders include poultry processors, packers, electronic assembly workers, data processors, supermarket check-out operators and telephonists. These jobs often contain a number of the relevant exposures of dynamic load, static load, a full or excessive range of movements and awkward postures. (See UPPER LIMB DISORDERS.)

Physical agents A number of physical agents cause occupational ill-health of which the most important is occupational deafness. Workplace noise exposures in excess of 85 decibels for a working day are likely to cause damage to hearing which is initially restricted to the vital frequencies associated with speech – around 3–4 kHz. Protection from such noise is imperative as hearing aids do nothing to ameliorate the neural damage once it has occurred.

Hand-arm vibration syndrome is a disorder of the vascular and/or neural endings in the hands leading to episodic blanching (‘white ?nger’) and numbness which is exacerbated by low temperature. The condition, which is caused by vibrating tools such as chain saws and pneumatic hammers, is akin to RAYNAUD’S DISEASE and can be disabling.

Decompression sickness is caused by a rapid change in ambient pressure and is a disease associated with deep-sea divers, tunnel workers and high-?ying aviators. Apart from the direct e?ects of pressure change such as ruptured tympanic membrane or sinus pain, the more serious damage is indirectly due to nitrogen bubbles appearing in the blood and blocking small vessels. Central and peripheral nervous-system damage and bone necrosis are the most dangerous sequelae.

Radiation Non-ionising radiation from lasers or microwaves can cause severe localised heating leading to tissue damage of which cataracts (see under EYE, DISORDERS OF) are a particular variety. Ionising radiation from radioactive sources can cause similar acute tissue damage to the eyes as well as cell damage to rapidly dividing cells in the gut and bone marrow. Longer-term e?ects include genetic damage and various malignant disorders of which LEUKAEMIA and aplastic ANAEMIA are notable. Particular radioactive isotopes may destroy or induce malignant change in target organs, for example, 131I (thyroid), 90Sr (bone). Outdoor workers may also be at risk of sunburn and skin cancers. OTHER OCCUPATIONAL CANCERS Occupation is directly responsible for about 5 per cent of all cancers and contributes to a further 5 per cent. Apart from the cancers caused by asbestos and ionising radiation, a number of other occupational exposures can cause human cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer regularly reviews the evidence for carcinogenicity of compounds and industrial processes, and its published list of carcinogens is widely accepted as the current state of knowledge. More than 50 agents and processes are listed as class 1 carcinogens. Important occupational carcinogens include asbestos (mesothelioma, lung cancer); polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons such as mineral oils, soots, tars (skin and lung cancer); the aromatic amines in dyestu?s (bladder cancer); certain hexavalent chromates, arsenic and nickel re?ning (lung cancer); wood and leather dust (nasal sinus cancer); benzene (leukaemia); and vinyl chloride monomer (angiosarcoma of the liver). It has been estimated that elimination of all known occupational carcinogens, if possible, would lead to an annual saving of 5,000 premature deaths in Britain.

Infections Two broad categories of job carry an occupational risk. These are workers in contact with animals (farmers, veterinary surgeons and slaughtermen) and those in contact with human sources of infection (health-care sta? and sewage workers).

Occupational infections include various zoonoses (pathogens transmissible from animals to humans), such as ANTHRAX, Borrelia burgdorferi (LYME DISEASE), bovine TUBERCULOSIS, BRUCELLOSIS, Chlamydia psittaci, leptospirosis, ORF virus, Q fever, RINGWORM and Streptococcus suis. Human pathogens that may be transmissible at work include tuberculosis, and blood-borne pathogens such as viral hepatitis (B and C) and HIV (see AIDS/HIV). Health-care workers at risk of exposure to infected blood and body ?uids should be immunised against hapatitis B.

Poisoning The incidence of occupational poisonings has diminished with the substitution of noxious chemicals with safer alternatives, and with the advent of improved containment. However, poisonings owing to accidents at work are still reported, sometimes with fatal consequences. Workers involved in the application of pesticides are particularly at risk if safe procedures are not followed or if equipment is faulty. Exposure to organophosphate pesticides, for example, can lead to breathing di?culties, vomiting, diarrhoea and abdominal cramps, and to other neurological e?ects including confusion and dizziness. Severe poisonings can lead to death. Exposure can be through ingestion, inhalation and dermal (skin) contact.

Stress and mental health Stress is an adverse reaction to excessive pressures or demands and, in occupational-health terms, is di?erent from the motivational impact often associated with challenging work (some refer to this as ‘positive stress’). Stress at work is often linked to increasing demands on workers, although coping can often prevent the development of stress. The causes of occupational stress are multivariate and encompass job characteristics (e.g. long or unsocial working hours, high work demands, imbalance between e?ort and reward, poorly managed organisational change, lack of control over work, poor social support at work, fear of redundancy and bullying), as well as individual factors (such as personality type, personal circumstances, coping strategies, and availability of psychosocial support outside work). Stress may in?uence behaviours such as smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep and diet, which may in turn a?ect people’s health. Stress may also have direct e?ects on the immune system (see IMMUNITY) and lead to a decline in health. Stress may also alter the course and response to treatment of conditions such as cardiovascular disease. As well as these general e?ects of stress, speci?c types of disorder may be observed.

Exposure to extremely traumatic incidents at work – such as dealing with a major accident involving multiple loss of life and serious injury

(e.g. paramedics at the scene of an explosion or rail crash) – may result in a chronic condition known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is an abnormal psychological reaction to a traumatic event and is characterised by extreme psychological discomfort, such as anxiety or panic when reminded of the causative event; su?erers may be plagued with uncontrollable memories and can feel as if they are going through the trauma again. PTSD is a clinically de?ned condition in terms of its symptoms and causes and should not be used to include normal short-term reactions to trauma.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

If you want to drink a special type of tea, try Olive Leaf Tea! It has an aromatic flavor, similar to green tea, but a bit sweeter, which makes for a pleasant cup of tea. Also, it has many benefits which help you stay healthy. Read to find out more! About Olive Leaf Tea Olive leaf tea is made from the leaves of the olive tree. We can find these trees on the coastal areas of the eastern Mediterranean Basin (including areas from Europe, Asia and Africa), as well as in northern Iran and northern Iraq. The leaves of the olive tree have a silvery green color. They are oblong, measuring 4-10cm long and 1-3 cm wide. The olive leaves are well-known for their many health benefits. Also, olive leaf extract is used for various soaps and skin creams. How to make Olive Leaf Tea Olive leaf teacan be bought either in loose leaf form or in tea bag form. In both cases, it is quite easy to prepare a cup of olive leaf tea. A teaspoon of olive leaves, or a teabag, is enough for one cup of olive leaf tea. Pour boiling water in the cup and let it steep for about 15 minutes. Once the steeping time is done, either remove the teabag or strain to remove the olive leaves. Also, if you’ve got olive trees around, you can make your own olive leaf tea. First, pick the healthy-looking leaves from the tree. Wash the leaves carefully; then, dry them in the oven, at a temperature below 65°C or 150°F. You can air-dry the leaves, too, but don’t leave them in direct sunlight, as that might reduce their health benefits. Once the leaves are dry, crush the leaves by hand, remove the stalks and store the dried herbs in paper packets. For a cup of olive leaf tea, just follow the simple steps mentioned above. Components of Olive Leaf Tea Olive leaves have many components which are good for our body. Seeing as the leaves are the main ingredient for the tea, the components are also transferred to the olive leaf tea.Some of the important ones include various antioxidants, polyphenols, and flavonoids. Olive leaves, as well as olive leaf tea, also have Vitamin C. Olive leaf tea doesn’t contain caffeine, so you don’t have to worry about getting any side effects caused by caffeine. Olive Leaf Tea Benefits Considering its many components, it’s not a lie when we say that a cup of olive leaf tea brings you many health benefits. First of all, olive leaf tea helps lower both LDL “bad” cholesterol levels and blood pressure. It also increases the blood flow by relaxing the arteries. Because of this, olive leaf tea is considered an important heart tonic. Olive leaf tea can also help you if you’ve got diabetes, as it lowers the blood sugar levels. Drinking olive leaf tea during winter can help you strengthen your immune system, and also fight against colds and the flu. It helps you relax, and it can count as an energy booster if you drink a lot of olive leaf tea. Olive leaf tea may also help you prevent the appearance of cancer or tumors. Plus, it is used in the treatment for viral infections, such as the Epstein-Barr disease, herpes, shingles, and malaria. It is also useful in healing inflammations of the bladder, as well as alienating arthritic pain and swelling. Olive Leaf Tea side effects If you know you’ve got a low blood pressure, don’t drink too much olive leaf tea. It will lower your blood pressure even more, and that might make you feel dizzy. In this case, be careful with the amount of olive leaf tea you drink. Some people might experience Herxheimers reaction when drinking olive leaf tea. Herxheimers reaction is an immune response to the release of toxins from pathogens which have been destroyed. It is a normal and good reaction, as that means the olive leaf tea is doing you good. The symptoms include    headaches, muscle and joint pain, fever, nausea, sore throat, and vaginal irritation. Reduce the amount of tea you drink, and also drink a large quantity of water daily to help the body eliminate the toxins. With this, the symptoms should disappear after a few days. Be careful if you’re taking any other medication. Olive leaf tea might interfere with the usual actions of the medication you’re taking. Before including olive leaf tea in your daily diet, make sure you talk to your doctor. If you’re pregnant or breast feeding, it is best to avoid drinking olive leaf tea. While it is not sure how harmful it can be in this case, it is best not to take a risk, in case it might cause miscarriages or affect the baby. Also, don›t drink more than six cups of olive leaf tea a day. It will lead to more side effects rather than to help you stay healthy. If you drink too much tea, the symptoms you might get are the following: headaches, dizziness, insomnia, irregular heartbeats, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. Make sure to reduce the amount of olive leaf tea you drink, if you get any of these. Not only does olive leaf tea have a pleasant taste, but one cup brings many health benefits with it. As long as you make sure you won’t get any side effects from consumption of olive leaf tea, you can easily include it in your daily diet. You definitely won’t regret it!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Oolong tea, literally meaning “Black Dragon”, is a traditional Chinese beverage which undergoes a unique preparation process resulting in a reddish drink with a slightly sweet delicate flavour. Oolong tea is partially fermented, unlike black tea, which is fully fermented, or green tea, which is unfermented. Oolong Tea Brewing Oolong tea requires a higher brewingtemperature in order to extract the complex aromas of the tea leaves. It is recommended to use spring or filtered water heated at a temperature of approximately 90 degrees Celsius. The steeping process for most Oolong teas should last no longer than five minutes. If this period is extended for too long, it may ruin the delicate aromas and turn your cup of tea unpleasantly bitter. Oolong teas are best served plain, but you can add milk, sugar, honey or lemon according to your taste. Oolong Tea Health Benefits Oolong tea, a hybrid between black and green tea, has numerous health benefits, especially if consumed regularly. Drinking Oolong tea stimulates brain activity and relieves mental and physical stress. Oolong tea has the potential of reducing high blood pressure, lowering blood sugar levels and preventing serious afflictions like obesity, osteoporosis, tooth decay, cancer or heart disease. Oolong tea accelerates the metabolism and promotes weight loss. Another health benefit of Oolong tea is its effectiveness in treating skin problems such as eczema and rashes and combating skin aging. Oolong Tea Side Effects Although drinking Oolong tea is extremely beneficial for the body, it can also lead to unpleasant side effects when consumed in large quantities, therefore moderation is required. These side effects include sleeping difficulties, anxiety or irritability, most of them related to excessive caffeine intake. It is not recommended for pregnant women and people suffering from kidney disorders. Furthermore, oolong tea has been proven to interact with certain medications; therefore, people who undertake treatment are advised to consult a health care provider first. Oolong tea is extremely effective in keeping your energy levels up, due to its caffeine content, and it also increases brain function, helping you maintain active and aware throughout the day.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you want both an aromatic tea, as well as a healthy one, orange peel tea is perfect. It is a delicious beverage, especially during cold winter days. It also helps you stay healthy, especially thanks to the amount of vitamin C it contains. Read this article to find out more about its health benefits and side effects. About Orange Peel Tea Orange peel tea is made from the peel of the orange fruit. The fruit grows in orange trees, which are cultivated all around the world. The orange peel is the outer skin of the orange, leathery-textured and with many oil glands. Orange peel, as well as the peel from other fruits (lemon, lime) has been used for medical purposes for many years. They are also used for culinary purposes, as they can be added to soups, stews, cakes or cookies. Components of Orange Peel Tea It is well-known that oranges have many nutritional components. Some are included in the orange peel, as well, and are thus transferred to the orange peel tea. The orange peel tea is, of course, a great source of Vitamin C, and also has vitamin B1. Other important active constituents are: choline, folic acid, antioxidant flavonoids, d-limonene, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and aldehydes. How to make Orange Peel Tea If you’ve got some oranges around, you can easily make your own orange peel tea from scratch. Peel the skin from an orange, cut it in smaller pieces, and let them dry, preferably in a cool, dry place. Once they’re dry, you can use them for your orange peel tea. Add a bit to a cup of boiling water and let it steep for about 10-15 minutes. Remove the pieces of dried orange peel and you’re ready to drink your cup of tea! Orange Peel Tea Benefits Because of its many active constituents, orange peel tea helps you stay healthy. One cup brings many health benefits. Orange peel tea helps you fight against viruses and bacteria. It is also useful when treating coughs, asthma, bronchitis, tightness in the chest, and colds. Generally, it is good at helping the body eliminate the phlegm in the lungs. Drinking orange peel tea helps you have a good digestion. It is useful when relieving gas, bloating and nausea, symptoms of an upset stomach. Also, it is drunk in order to treat constipation, and it helps boost your appetite. Orange peel tea is also helpful when it comes to having a good oral hygiene. It helps you take care and treat sensitive skin, and it also eliminates bad breath. Another benefit is related to stimulating blood circulation and the flow in the lymphatic system. Also, orange peel tea is useful with helping you fight stress, nervousness, and insomnia. For women who have just given birth, orange peel tea helps treat mastitis (when the breast feels swollen because of excess milk production). If this is your case, then it’s recommended that you drink it twice a day. Orange Peel Tea Side Effects Just like any type of tea, orange peel tea also comes with a few side effects. First, it is recommended that you not drink orange peel tea while you’re pregnant. It might cause problems to the baby. Orange peel tea can act as a stimulant in some cases. It might cause symptoms such as nervousness or restlessness, and you might also have trouble falling asleep. It will act even more as a stimulant if you take a supplement that contains caffeine. If your family has a history of heart diseases, speak to your doctor before drinking orange peel tea. It might be harmful for you, and cause high blood pressure, hypertension, arrhythmias, tachycardia, fainting, heart palpitations and chest pains. Be careful if you’re suffering from hyperthyroidism. Orange peel tea may aggravate the thyroid’s condition. It might also weaken your body, or cause vision problems. It can cause your vision to get blurry, difficulty in focusing, and it might also worsen glaucoma. Not only is orange peel tea richly aromatic and delicious, but it is also good for your health. Make sure you get no side effects and then you can enjoy a cup of orange peel tea!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Passionfruit Tea is known for its astringent and slightly sweet and fruity taste. It is typically made out of a black tea base that has been infused with the essence and flavor of passionfruit. The passionfruit (passiflora edulis) is native to northern and central South America. It can be recognized by its round to oval shape, having either yellow or dark purple color. It has a juicy interior, full with a lot of seeds. Passionfruit Tea is rich in antioxidants, amino acids, vitamins (B, C and E) and minerals (magnesium and potassium). How To Make Passionfruit Tea To brew Passionfruit Tea, you will have to place 1 teaspoon of loose-leaf tea or 1 passionfruit teabag in a cup of boiled water. Let the mix steep for about 3-4 minutes and then, pour the tea into your cup using a strainer to catch the leaves (if you are making tea out of leaves). You can sweeten the tea by adding honey or sugar. The best thing about this tea is that it can be drank either hot or cold. Passionfruit Tea Benefits
  • Lowers the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases.
  • Provides relaxation.
  • Improves digestion.
  • Due to its antioxidant content, Passionfruit Tea may help lowering the risk of developing tumors and cancer.
  • Strengthens the immune system.
  • Fights skin and tissue damage.
Passionfruit Tea Side Effects Passionfruit Tea has not presented any severe side effects. However, it does have some possible side effects that should be taken into consideration when drinking any type of tea.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid drinking Passionfruit Tea.
  • Passionfruit Tea may interact with the effects of some medications, so consult your doctor before drinking passionfruit tea.
  • People with blood sugar problems should also avoid drinking Passionfruit Tea.
Passionfruit Tea makes an excellent fruit tea option. It can be drank either hot or cold, so it is ideal for both winter and summer! Just make sure you enjoy all its benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

Chemicals produced and emitted by an individual which produce changes in the social or sexual behaviour when perceived by other individuals of the same species. The precise role of these odours – for it is by their smell that they are recognised – in humans is still not clear, but there is growing evidence of the part they play in the animal kingdom. Thus, if a strange male rat is put into a group of female rats, this may cause death of the fetus in any pregnant rats, and this is attributed to the pheromones emitted by the male rat.... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

This is the Latin for magpie and is used to describe an abnormal craving for unusual foods. It is not uncommon in pregnancy. Among the unusual substances for which pregnant women have developed a craving are soap, clay pipes, bed linen, charcoal, ashes – and almost every imaginable food stu? taken in excess. In primitive races, the presence of pica is taken as an indication that the growing fetus requires such food. It is also not uncommon in children in whom, previously, it was an important cause of LEAD POISONING due to ingestion of paint ?akes. (See also APPETITE.)... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Pleurisy root tea is an aromatic herbal tea which you are bound to enjoy. The indigenous Indians used to drink it a lot, especially thanks to its health benefits. About Pleurisy Root Tea Pleurisy root tea is made from the roots of the pleurisy plant, also known as the butterfly weed. The plant grows in North America. It can grow up to 1m tall, with multiple stems and spirally-arranged, spear-pointed leaves that are 5-12cm long. Clusters of orange or yellow flowers bloom during summertime, attracting butterflies, insects and birds. The plant can be found growing on dry, open fields, under direct sunlight. How to prepare Pleurisy Root Tea If you want to enjoy a cup of pleurisy root tea, add a teaspoon of dried, chopped roots to a cup of freshly boiled water. Let it steep for 10-15 minutes before straining it to remove the herbs. Sweeten it with honey or fruit juice, if necessary. Pleurisy Root Tea Benefits Pleurisy root contains various active constituents, such as glycosides, resins, amino acids, volatile oil, glucosidal principal, lupeol, and alkaloids. They are transferred to the pleurisy root tea, as well. Because if this, the tea has lots of important health benefits. Pleurisy root tea is often included in treatments for various respiratory ailments and pulmonary infections, for example pleurisy, asthma, bronchitis or pneumonia. It helps alleviate pain and congestion by reducing the mucus thickness in the lungs and enabling the patient to expel the blockage. Drinking pleurisy root tea helps both with fevers and detoxification, as it stimulates sweating and perspiration. It is also useful as an herbal treatment for colds and influenza. You can also drink pleurisy root tea if you’ve got problems with diarrhea, dysentery, chronic rheumatism, colic, muscle tension and spasm. Pleurisy root tea can also be used topically. You can soak a clean cloth with the tea and use it to treat swellings, bruises, lameness, wounds and skin ulcers. Pleurisy Root Tea Side Effects If you’re pregnant, you shouldn’t drink pleurisy root tea. It may cause uterine contractions, which could lead to miscarriages. Also, it is safer not to drink this tea if you’re breast feeding. Children shouldn’t drink pleurisy root tea either, because of the small amount of cardiac glycosides. You should be careful with the amount of pleurisy root tea you drink if you’ve got cardiovascular problems or you’re taking cardiac glycosides. Also, if you’re taking any other medication, check with your doctor if it’s safe to drink pleurisy root tea. Don’t drink more than 3-4 cups of pleurisy root tea a day. If you drink too much, it might lead to symptoms such as intestinal cramping, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Pleurisy root tea is ideal for an everyday beverage. It has many health benefits and only a few side effects. Once you try it, you’ll surely enjoy it!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

Pregnancy The time when a woman carries a developing baby in her UTERUS. For the ?rst 12 weeks (the ?rst trimester) the baby is known as an EMBRYO, after which it is referred to as the FETUS.

Pregnancy lasts about 280 days and is calculated from the ?rst day of the last menstrual period – see MENSTRUATION. Pregnancy-testing kits rely on the presence of the hormone beta HUMAN CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN (b HCG) which is excreted in the woman’s urine as early as 30 days from the last menstrual period. The estimated date of delivery can be accurately estimated from the size of the developing fetus measured by ULTRASOUND (see also below) between seven and 24 weeks. ‘Term’ refers to the time that the baby is due; this can range from 38 weeks to 41 completed weeks.

Physical changes occur in early pregnancy – periods stop and the abdomen enlarges. The breasts swell, with the veins becoming prominent and the nipples darkening. About two in three women will have nausea with a few experiencing such severe vomiting as to require hospital admission for rehydration.

Antenatal care The aim of antenatal care is to ensure a safe outcome for both mother and child; it is provided by midwives (see MIDWIFE) and doctors. Formal antenatal care began in Edinburgh in the 1930s with the recognition that all aspects of pregnancy – normal and abnormal – warranted surveillance. Cooperation between general practitioners, midwives and obstetricians is now established, with pregnancies that are likely to progress normally being cared for in the community and only those needing special intervention being cared for in a hospital setting.

The initial visit (or booking) in the ?rst half of pregnancy will record the history of past events and the results of tests, with the aim of categorising the patients into normal or not. Screening tests including blood checks and ultrasound scans are a routine part of antenatal care. The ?rst ultrasound scan is done at about 11 weeks to date the pregnancy, with a further one done at 20 weeks – the anomaly scan – to assess the baby’s structure. Some obstetric units will check the growth of the baby with one further scan later in the pregnancy or, in the case of twin pregnancies (see below), many scans throughout. The routine blood tests include checks for ANAEMIA, DIABETES MELLITUS, sickle-cell disease and THALASSAEMIA, as well as for the blood group. Evidence of past infections is also looked for; tests for RUBELLA (German measles) and SYPHILIS are routine, whereas tests for human immunode?ciency virus (see AIDS/ HIV below) and HEPATITIS are being o?ered as optional, although there is compelling evidence that knowledge of the mother’s infection status is bene?cial to the baby.

Traditional antenatal care consists of regular appointments, initially every four weeks until 34 weeks, then fortnightly or weekly. At each visit the mother’s weight, urine and blood pressure are checked, and assessment of fetal growth and position is done by palpating the uterus. Around two-thirds of pregnancies and labours are normal: in the remainder, doctors and midwives need to increase the frequency of surveillance so as to prevent or deal with maternal and fetal problems.

Common complications of pregnancy

Some of the more common complications of pregnancy are listed below.

As well as early detection of medical complications, antenatal visits aim to be supportive and include emotional and educational care. Women with uncomplicated pregnancies are increasingly being managed by midwives and general practitioners in the community and only coming to the hospital doctors should they develop a problem. A small number will opt for a home delivery, but facilities for providing such a service are not always available in the UK.

Women requiring more intensive surveillance have their management targeted to the speci?c problems encountered. Cardiologists will see mothers-to-be with heart conditions, and those at risk of diabetes are cared for in designated clinics with specialist sta?. Those women needing more frequent surveillance than standard antenatal care can be looked after in maternity day centres. These typically include women with mildly raised blood pressure or those with small babies. Fetal medicine units have specialists who are highly skilled in ultrasound scanning and specialise in the diagnosis and management of abnormal babies still in the uterus. ECTOPIC PREGNANCY Chronic abdominal discomfort early in pregnancy may be caused by unruptured ectopic pregnancy, when, rarely, the fertilised OVUM starts developing in the Fallopian tube (see FALLOPIAN TUBES) instead of the uterus. The patient needs hospital treatment and LAPAROSCOPY. A ruptured ectopic pregnancy causes acute abdominal symptoms and collapse, and the woman will require urgent abdominal surgery. URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS These a?ect around 2 per cent of pregnant women and are detected by a laboratory test of a mid-stream specimen of urine. In pregnancy, symptoms of these infections do not necessarily resemble those experienced by non-pregnant women. As they can cause uterine irritability and possible premature labour (see below), it is important to ?nd and treat them appropriately. ANAEMIA is more prevalent in patients who are vegetarian or on a poor diet. Iron supplements are usually given to women who have low concentrations of HAEMOGLOBIN in their blood (less than 10.5 g/dl) or who are at risk of becoming low in iron, from bleeding, twin pregnancies and those with placenta previa (see below). ANTEPARTUM HAEMORRHAGE Early in pregnancy, vaginal bleedings may be due to a spontaneous or an incomplete therapeutic ABORTION. Bleeding from the genital tract between 24 completed weeks of pregnancy and the start of labour is called antepartum haemorrhage. The most common site is where the PLACENTA is attached to the wall of the uterus. If the placenta separates before delivery, bleeding occurs in the exposed ‘bed’. When the placenta is positioned in the upper part of the uterus it is called an abruption. PLACENTA PRAEVIA is sited in the lower part and blocks or partly blocks the cervix (neck of the womb); it can be identi?ed at about the 34th week. Ten per cent of episodes of antepartum bleeding are caused by placenta previa, and it may be associated with bleeding at delivery. This potentially serious complication is diagnosed by ultrasound scanning and may require a caesarean section (see below) at delivery. INCREASED BLOOD PRESSURE, associated with protein in the urine and swelling of the limbs, is part of a condition known as PRE-ECLAMPSIA. This occurs in the second half of pregnancy in about 1 in 10 women expecting their ?rst baby, and is mostly very mild and of no consequence to the pregnancy. However, some women can develop extremely high blood pressures which can adversely a?ect the fetus and cause epileptic-type seizures and bleeding disorders in the mother. This serious condition is called ECLAMPSIA. For this reason a pregnant woman with raised blood pressure or PROTEIN in her urine is carefully evaluated with blood tests, often in the maternity day assessment unit. The condition can be stopped by delivery of the baby, and this will be done if the mother’s or the fetus’s life is in danger. If the condition is milder, and the baby not mature enough for a safe delivery, then drugs can be used to control the blood pressure. MISCARRIAGE Also called spontaneous abortion, miscarriage is the loss of the fetus. There are several types:

threatened miscarriage is one in which some vaginal bleeding occurs, the uterus is enlarged, but the cervix remains closed and pregnancy usually proceeds.

inevitable miscarriage usually occurs before the 16th week and is typi?ed by extensive blood loss through an opened cervix and cramp-like abdominal pain; some products of conception are lost but the developing placental area (decidua) is retained and an operation may be necessary to clear the womb.

missed miscarriages, in which the embryo dies and is absorbed, but the decidua (placental area of uterine wall) remains and may cause abdominal discomfort and discharge of old blood.

THERAPEUTIC ABORTION is performed on more than 170,000 women annually in England and Wales. Sometimes the woman may not have arranged the procedure through the usual health-care channels, so that a doctor may see a patient with vaginal bleeding, abdominal discomfort or pain, and open cervix – symptoms which suggest that the decidua and a blood clot have been retained; these retained products will need to be removed by curettage.

Septic abortions are now much less common in Britain than before the Abortion Act (1967) permitted abortion in speci?ed circumstances. The cause is the passage of infective organisms from the vagina into the uterus, with Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis the most common pathogenic agents. The woman has abdominal pain, heavy bleeding, usually fever and sometimes she is in shock. The cause is usually an incomplete abortion or one induced in unsterile circumstances. Antibiotics and curettage are the treatment. INTRAUTERINE GROWTH RETARDATION describes a slowing of the baby’s growth. This can be diagnosed by ultrasound scanning, although there is a considerable margin of error in estimates of fetal weight. Trends in growth are favoured over one-o? scan results alone. GESTATIONAL DIABETES is a condition that is more common in women who are overweight or have a family member with diabetes. If high concentrations of blood sugar are found, e?orts are made to correct it as the babies can become very fat (macrosomia), making delivery more di?cult. A low-sugar diet is usually enough to control the blood concentration of sugars; however some women need small doses of INSULIN to achieve control. FETAL ABNORMALITIES can be detected before birth using ultrasound. Some of these defects are obvious, such as the absence of kidneys, a condition incompatible with life outside the womb. These women can be o?ered a termination of their pregnancy. However, more commonly, the pattern of problems can only hint at an abnormality and closer examination is needed, particularly in the diagnosis of chromosomal deformities such as DOWN’S (DOWN) SYNDROME (trisomy 21 or presence of three 21 chromosomes instead of two).

Chromosomal abnormalities can be de?nitively diagnosed only by cell sampling such as amniocentesis (obtaining amniotic ?uid – see AMNION – from around the baby) done at 15 weeks onwards, and chorionic villus sampling (sampling a small part of the placenta) – another technique which can be done from 12 weeks onwards. Both have a small risk of miscarriage associated with them; consequently, they are con?ned to women at higher risk of having an abnormal fetus.

Biochemical markers present in the pregnant woman’s blood at di?erent stages of pregnancy may have undergone changes in those carrying an abnormal fetus. The ?rst such marker to be routinely used was a high concentration of alpha-fetol protein in babies with SPINA BIFIDA (defects in the covering of the spinal cord). Fuller research has identi?ed a range of diagnostic markers which are useful, and, in conjunction with other factors such as age, ethnic group and ultrasound ?ndings, can provide a predictive guide to the obstetrician – in consultation with the woman – as to whether or not to proceed to an invasive test. These tests include pregnancy-associated plasma protein assessed from a blood sample taken at 12 weeks and four blood tests at 15–22 weeks – alphafetol protein, beta human chorionic gonadotrophin, unconjugated oestriol and inhibin A. Ultrasound itself can reveal physical ?ndings in the fetus, which can be more common in certain abnormalities. Swelling in the neck region of an embryo in early pregnancy (increased nuchal thickness) has good predictive value on its own, although its accuracy is improved in combination with the biochemical markers. The e?ectiveness of prenatal diagnosis is rapidly evolving, the aim being to make the diagnosis as early in the pregnancy as possible to help the parents make more informed choices. MULTIPLE PREGNANCIES In the UK, one in 95 deliveries is of twins, while the prevalence of triplets is one in 10,000 and quadruplets around one in 500,000. Racial variations occur, with African women having a prevalence rate of one in 30 deliveries for twins and Japanese women a much lower rate than the UK ?gure. Multiple pregnancies occur more often in older women, and in the UK the prevalence of fertility treatments, many of these being given to older women, has raised the incidence. There is now an o?cial limit of three eggs being transferred to a woman undergoing ASSISTED CONCEPTION (gamete intrafallopian transfer, or GIFT).

Multiple pregnancies are now usually diagnosed as a result of routine ultrasound scans between 16 and 20 weeks of pregnancy. The increased size of the uterus results in the mother having more or worse pregnancy-related conditions such as nausea, abdominal discomfort, backache and varicose veins. Some congenital abnormalities in the fetus occur more frequently in twins: NEURAL TUBE defects, abnormalities of the heart and the incidence of TURNER’S SYNDROME and KLINEFELTER’S SYNDROME are examples. Such abnormalities may be detected by ultrasound scans or amniocentesis. High maternal blood pressure and anaemia are commoner in women with multiple pregnancies (see above).

The growth rates of multiple fetuses vary, but the di?erence between them and single fetuses are not that great until the later stages of pregnancy. Preterm labour is commoner in multiple pregnancies: the median length of pregnancy is 40 weeks for singletons, 37 for twins and 33 for triplets. Low birth-weights are usually the result of early delivery rather than abnormalities in growth rates. Women with multiple pregnancies require more frequent and vigilant antenatal assessments, with their carers being alert to the signs of preterm labour occurring. CEPHALOPELVIC DISPROPORTION Disparity between the size of the fetus and the mother’s pelvis is not common in the UK but is a signi?cant problem in the developing world. Disparity is classi?ed as absolute, when there is no possibility of delivery, and relative, when the baby is large but delivery (usually after a dif?cult labour) is possible. Causes of absolute disparity include: a large baby – heavier than 5 kg at birth; fetal HYDROCEPHALUS; and an abnormal maternal pelvis. The latter may be congenital, the result of trauma or a contraction in pelvic size because of OSTEOMALACIA early in life. Disproportion should be suspected if in late pregnancy the fetal head has not ‘engaged’ in the pelvis. Sometimes a closely supervised ‘trial of labour’ may result in a successful, if prolonged, delivery. Otherwise a caesarean section (see below) is necessary. UNUSUAL POSITIONS AND PRESENTATIONS OF THE BABY In most pregnant women the baby ?ts into the maternal pelvis head-?rst in what is called the occipito-anterior position, with the baby’s face pointing towards the back of the pelvis. Sometimes, however, the head may face the other way, or enter the pelvis transversely – or, rarely, the baby’s neck is ?exed backwards with the brow or face presenting to the neck of the womb. Some malpositions will correct naturally; others can be manipulated abdominally during pregnancy to a better position. If, however, the mother starts labour with the baby’s head badly positioned or with the buttocks instead of the head presenting (breech position), the labour will usually be longer and more di?cult and may require intervention using special obstetric forceps to assist in extracting the baby. If progress is poor and the fetus distressed, caesarean section may be necessary. HIV INFECTION Pregnant women who are HIV positive (see HIV; AIDS/HIV) should be taking antiviral drugs in the ?nal four to ?ve months of pregnancy, so as to reduce the risk of infecting the baby in utero and during birth by around 50 per cent. Additional antiviral treatment is given before delivery; the infection risk to the baby can be further reduced – by about 40 per cent – if delivery is by caesarean section. The mother may prefer to have the baby normally, in which case great care should be taken not to damage the baby’s skin during delivery. The infection risk to the baby is even further reduced if it is not breast fed. If all preventive precautions are taken, the overall risk of the infant becoming infected is cut to under 5 per cent.

Premature birth This is a birth that takes place before the end of the normal period of gestation, usually before 37 weeks. In practice, however, it is de?ned as a birth that takes place when the baby weighs less than 2·5 kilograms (5••• pounds). Between 5 and 10 per cent of babies are born prematurely, and in around 40 per cent of premature births the cause is unknown. Pre-eclampsia is the most common known cause; others include hypertension, chronic kidney disease, heart disease and diabetes mellitus. Multiple pregnancy is another cause. In the vast majority of cases the aim of management is to prolong the pregnancy and so improve the outlook for the unborn child. This consists essentially of rest in bed and sedation, but there are now several drugs, such as RITODRINE, that may be used to suppress the activity of the uterus and so help to delay premature labour. Prematurity was once a prime cause of infant mortality but modern medical care has greatly improved survival rates in developing countries.

Labour Also known by the traditional terms parturition, childbirth or delivery, this is the process by which the baby and subsequently the placenta are expelled from the mother’s body. The onset of labour is often preceded by a ‘show’ – the loss of the mucus and blood plug from the cervix, or neck of the womb; this passes down the vagina to the exterior. The time before the beginning of labour is called the ‘latent phase’ and characteristically lasts 24 hours or more in a ?rst pregnancy. Labour itself is de?ned by regular, painful contractions which cause dilation of the neck of the womb and descent of the fetal head. ‘Breaking of the waters’ is the loss of amniotic ?uid vaginally and can occur any time in the delivery process.

Labour itself is divided into three stages: the ?rst is from the onset of labour to full (10 cm) dilation of the neck of the womb. This stage varies in length, ideally taking no more than one hour per centimetre of dilation. Progress is monitored by regular vaginal examinations, usually every four hours. Fetal well-being is observed by intermittent or continuous monitoring of the fetal heart rate in relation to the timing and frequency of the contractions. The print-out is called a cardiotocograph. Abnormalities of the fetal heart rate may suggest fetal distress and may warrant intervention. In women having their ?rst baby (primigravidae), the common cause of a slow labour is uncoordinated contractions which can be overcome by giving either of the drugs PROSTAGLANDIN or OXYTOCIN, which provoke contractions of the uterine muscle, by an intravenous drip. Labours which progress slowly or not at all may be due to abnormal positioning of the fetus or too large a fetus, when prostaglandin or oxytocin is used much more cautiously.

The second stage of labour is from full cervical dilation to the delivery of the baby. At this stage the mother often experiences an irresistible urge to push the baby out, and a combination of strong coordinated uterine contractions and maternal e?ort gradually moves the baby down the birth canal. This stage usually lasts under an hour but can take longer. Delay, exhaustion of the mother or distress of the fetus may necessitate intervention by the midwife or doctor. This may mean enlarging the vaginal opening with an EPISIOTOMY (cutting of the perineal outlet – see below) or assisting the delivery with specially designed obstetric forceps or a vacuum extractor (ventouse). If the cervix is not completely dilated or open and the head not descended, then an emergency caesarean section may need to be done to deliver the baby. This procedure involves delivering the baby and placenta through an incision in the mother’s abdomen. It is sometimes necessary to deliver by planned or elective caesarean section: for example, if the placenta is low in the uterus – called placenta praevia – making a vaginal delivery dangerous.

The third stage occurs when the placenta (or afterbirth) is delivered, which is usually about 10–20 minutes after the baby. An injection of ergometrine and oxytocin is often given to women to prevent bleeding.

Pain relief in labour varies according to the mother’s needs. For uncomplicated labours, massage, reassurance by a birth attendant, and a warm bath and mobilisation may be enough for some women. However, some labours are painful, particularly if the woman is tired or anxious or is having her ?rst baby. In these cases other forms of analgesia are available, ranging from inhalation of NITROUS OXIDE GAS, injection of PETHIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE or similar narcotic, and regional local anaesthetic (see ANAESTHESIA).

Once a woman has delivered, care continues to ensure her and the baby’s safety. The midwives are involved in checking that the uterus returns to its normal size and that there is no infection or heavy bleeding, as well as caring for stitches if needed. The normal blood loss after birth is called lochia and generally is light, lasting up to six weeks. Midwives o?er support with breast feeding and care of the infant and will visit the parents at home routinely for up to two weeks.

Some complications of labour All operative deliveries in the UK are now done in hospitals, and are performed if a spontaneous birth is expected to pose a bigger risk to the mother or her child than a specialist-assisted one. Operative deliveries include caesarean section, forceps-assisted deliveries and those in which vacuum extraction (ventouse) is used. CAESAREAN SECTION Absolute indications for this procedure, which is used to deliver over 15 per cent of babies in Britain, are cephalopelvic disproportion and extensive placenta praevia, both discussed above. Otherwise the decision to undertake caesarean section depends on the clinical judgement of the specialist and the views of the mother. The rise in the proportion of this type of intervention (from 5 per cent in the 1930s to its present level of over 23 per cent

P

of the 600,000 or so annual deliveries in England) has been put down to defensive medicine

– namely, the doctor’s fear of litigation (initiated often because the parents believe that the baby’s health has su?ered because the mother had an avoidably di?cult ‘natural’ labour). In Britain, over 60 per cent of women who have had a caesarean section try a vaginal delivery in a succeeding pregnancy, with about two-thirds of these being successful. Indications for the operation include:

absolute and relative cephalopelvic disproportion.

placenta previa.

fetal distress.

prolapsed umbilical cord – this endangers the viability of the fetus because the vital supply of oxygen and nutrients is interrupted.

malpresentation of the fetus such as breech or transverse lie in the womb.

unsatisfactory previous pregnancies or deliveries.

a request from the mother.

Caesarean sections are usually performed using regional block anaesthesia induced by a spinal or epidural injection. This results in loss of feeling in the lower part of the body; the mother is conscious and the baby not exposed to potential risks from volatile anaesthetic gases inhaled by the mother during general anaesthesia. Post-operative complications are higher with general anaesthesia, but maternal anxiety and the likelihood that the operation might be complicated and di?cult are indications for using it. A general anaesthetic may also be required for an acute obstetric emergency. At operation the mother’s lower abdomen is opened and then her uterus opened slowly with a transverse incision and the baby carefully extracted. A transverse incision is used in preference to the traditional vertical one as it enables the woman to have a vaginal delivery in any future pregnancy with a much smaller risk of uterine rupture. Women are usually allowed to get up within 24 hours and are discharged after four or ?ve days. FORCEPS AND VENTOUSE DELIVERIES Obstetric forceps are made in several forms, but all are basically a pair of curved blades shaped so that they can obtain a purchase on the baby’s head, thus enabling the operator to apply traction and (usually) speed up delivery. (Sometimes they are used to slow down progress of the head.) A ventouse or vacuum extractor comprises an egg-cup-shaped metal or plastic head, ranging from 40 to 60 mm in diameter with a hollow tube attached through which air is extracted by a foot-operated vacuum pump. The instrument is placed on the descending head, creating a negative pressure on the skin of the scalp and enabling the operator to pull the head down. In mainland Europe, vacuum extraction is generally preferred to forceps for assisting natural deliveries, being used in around 5 per cent of all deliveries. Forceps have a greater risk of causing damage to the baby’s scalp and brain than vacuum extraction, although properly used, both types should not cause any serious damage to the baby.

Episiotomy Normal and assisted deliveries put the tissues of the genital tract under strain. The PERINEUM is less elastic than the vagina and, if it seems to be splitting as the baby’s head

moves down the birth canal, it may be necessary to cut the perineal tissue – a procedure called an episiotomy – to limit damage. This is a simple operation done under local anaesthetic. It should be done only if there is a speci?c indication; these include:

to hasten the second stage of labour if the fetus is distressed.

to facilitate the use of forceps or vacuum extractor.

to enlarge a perineum that is restricted because of unyielding tissue, perhaps because of a scar from a previous labour. Midwives as well as obstetricians are trained

to undertake and repair (with sutures) episiotomies.

(For organisations which o?er advice and information on various aspects of childbirth, including eclampsia, breast feeding and multiple births, see APPENDIX 2: ADDRESSES: SOURCES OF INFORMATION, ADVICE, SUPPORT AND SELF-HELP.)... Medical Dictionary

Pregnancy Calendar

4 weeks pregnancy

"Pregnancy calendar" at 4th week: A miracle begins! Your baby, now consisting of a cell stack, is clinging to the walls of your uterus and starting to grow rapidly. Early pregnancy in this period, for example, nausea in pregnancy is extremely normal. Birth is a beautiful yet remote dream.

Your baby in 4 weeks pregnancy

Your baby is a seed of poppy seeds. By the end of the week your baby will be about 1 mm long. Once the fertilized egg is placed on the side of your uterus, it divides into cell layers and becomes an embryo from official care. These cells turn into the body of your baby during pregnancy, forming the nervous system, skeleton, muscles and organs.

Support system in formation

The disc-like organ, which connects your body systems to the baby's systems, begins to form and attaches to the uterine wall where the egg is placed. The umbilical cord comes out of one of the placenta. Amniotic fluid, which will stretch your baby during pregnancy, has begun to form in a circumscribing membrane sac.

Your 4th week pregnancy

As the fertilized egg gets into your uterus, you may experience some bleeding. This is known as implantation hemorrhage and is completely normal.

The results came

Thanks to the brand-new placenta-attacked hCG hormone and a pregnancy test at home after the first period you missed, you will get a positive result, but false negative results can also be seen. This hormone is the greatest cause of nausea or morning sickness that many pregnant women experience in the first three months. If you are not pregnant, but your pregnancy test at home is negative, you may need a doctor.... Pregnancy Calendar

Pregnancy Calendar

5-week pregnancy

"Pregnancy calendar" at week 5: Your baby's brain is developing. You may feel fears about pregnancy and birth during this period. These emotional fluctuations are normal, do not worry at all!

Baby for 5 weeks gestation

Your baby, between 1 and 2.5 mm, is a small orange seed.

Installation ready

The placenta and the umbilical cord that begins to form have begun to work to transfer the necessary nutrients from your body to the body of the baby. Oxygen, amino acids, fats and sugars all play a critical role in a healthy development.

Some basics

Some of Baby's cells turn into a nerve pathway that will form the backbone and brain. An incorrectly formed nerve pathway can lead to a complication called "discrete spine", a condition in which the spinal cord is not completely closed. Your best weapon against spinal cord birth defects is to take at least 400 micrograms of folic acid every day.

Heart start

The heart is now a single tube with a few irregular shots. With each passing week these shots will become more regular.

Your 5th week pregnancy

Emotional ocean

You may be very happy because you are pregnant, worried about everything being normal, fearful about birth, or not being sure of yourself as a mothers of mothers. Do not worry about it! All of these feelings are completely normal. By weekly calculation of pregnancy and birth calculation, keep your head busy dreaming about the birth of your baby.

Careful maintenance

At this stage of the pregnancy period, menstrual cramps and back pain are common. Take a break by taking a warm bath, listening to soothing music or taking a nap. Watch your food and if you have not done so, stop smoking, drinking alcohol or taking medication. All of this is harmful to your baby.... Pregnancy Calendar

Medical Dictionary

There are several tests for pregnancy (see PREGNANCY AND LABOUR) in its early stages, and these can be done on blood or urine; some of the urine tests may be carried out at home. Most tests are based on the detection of HUMAN CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN (HCG) in the woman’s urine. They are nearly 100 per cent accurate and may show positive as early as 30 days after the ?rst day of the last normal period.

The haemagglutination inhibition test This, and the subsequent tests to be mentioned, are known as immunological tests. They are based upon the e?ect of the urine from a pregnant woman upon the interaction of red blood cells, which have been sensitised to human gonadotrophin, and anti-gonadotrophin serum. They have the great practical advantage of being performed in a test-tube or even on a slide. Because of their ease and speed of performance, a result can be obtained in two hours.

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) This is the basis of many of the pregnancy-testing kits obtainable from pharmacies. It is a highly sensitive antibody test and can detect very low concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin. Positive results show up as early as ten days after fertilisation – namely, four days before the ?rst missed period.

Ultrasound The fetal sac can be detected by ULTRASOUND from ?ve weeks, and a fetal echo at around six or seven weeks (see also PRENATAL SCREENING OR DIAGNOSIS).... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

Prenatal screening of fetal abnormalities may be the result of screening tests carried out on most or all pregnant women, or as the result of speci?c diagnostic tests performed to detect speci?c conditions. Prenatal diagnosis is important as it will identify babies who might need medical or surgical treatment before or soon after birth. In addition, it may also detect severe abnormalities for which parents might decide to have a therapeutic ABORTION.

ULTRASOUND scanning is probably the most widely used diagnostic tool in obstetric practice. It can detect structural abnormalities such as SPINA BIFIDA and CLEFT PALATE and even cardiac and renal problems. A series of scans can assess whether the baby is growing at a normal rate; ultrasound may also be used to assist with other diagnostic tests (e.g. AMNIOCENTESIS – see below).

Tests on the mother’s blood can also diagnose fetal abnormalities. Alphafetoprotein (AFP) is produced by babies and ‘leaks’ into the AMNIOTIC FLUID and is absorbed by the mother. In spina bi?da and other neural-tube defects there is increased leakage of AFP, and a blood test at 16 weeks’ gestation can detect a raised level which suggests the presence of these abnormalities.

The triple test, also performed at 16 weeks, measures AFP and two hormones – HUMAN CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN and unconjugated OESTRADIOL – and is used in diagnosing DOWN’S (DOWN) SYNDROME.

Amniocentesis involves inserting a needle through the mother’s abdominal wall into the uterus to remove a sample of amniotic ?uid at 16–18 weeks. Examination of the ?uid and the cells it contains is used in the diagnosis of Down’s syndrome and other inherited disorders. The test carries a small risk of miscarriage.

Chorionic villus sampling may be used to diagnose various inherited conditions. A small amount of tissue from the developing PLACENTA is removed for analysis: this test has the advantages of having a lower incidence of miscarriage than amniocentesis and is carried out at an earlier stage (9–13 weeks).

Analysis of a blood sample removed from the umbilical cord (cordocentesis) may diagnose infections in the uterus, blood disorders or inherited conditions.

Direct observation of the fetus via a viewing instrument called a fetoscope is also used diagnostically and will detect structural abnormalities.

Most tests have a recognised incidence of false positive and negative results and are therefore usually cross-checked with another test. Counselling of the parents about prenatal tests is important. This allows them to make an informed choice which may not necessarily involve terminating the pregnancy if an abnormality is found. (See PREGNANCY AND LABOUR.)... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

Pseudocyesis means spurious or false pregnancy, a condition characterised by enlargement of the abdomen, and even enlargement of the breasts and early-morning sickness – the woman being quite convinced that she is pregnant.... Medical Dictionary

Medical Dictionary

Any previously existing mental-health problems may worsen under the stress of pregnancy and childbirth, and a woman’s socio-economic circumstances may be an in?uential factor. Mood swings are common in pregnant women and mothers of new babies; sympathetic support from sta? and relations will usually remedy the situation. If postnatal depression lasts for more than a week or two the use of mild ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS may be justi?ed. If depression persists, referral to a psychiatrist may be advisable. Rarely, severe psychiatric problems – puerperal psychosis – may develop during or after pregnancy and referral to an appropriate psychiatric unit is then essential. If the mother’s social circumstances are unsatisfactory, advice should be sought from social services departments. Mothers may also need advice on bene?ts to which they are entitled and how to claim them. Bene?ts Agency o?ces or Citizens’ Advice Bureaux as well as antenatal clinics are useful sources of information.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Pu’erh tea is a type of post-fermented tea produced in China. Read this article to find out more about its many health benefits! About Pu’erh Tea Pu’erh tea is a post-fermented tea produced in the Chinese province Yunnan. Post-fermented teas are different from other types of tea in the sense that, after the leaves are dried and rolled, they undergo a microbial fermentation process. The pu’erh teais available as loose leaves or as tea brick (tea leaves packed in molds and pressed into block form). There are also two categories of pu’erh tea: the raw type and the ripe type. Raw pu’erh tea can count as a type of green tea. Ripened or aged pu’erh tea is often mistakenly called a type of black tea, though it isn’t. How to prepare Pu’erh Tea Pu’erh tea can be bought and prepared in loose leaf form, in tea bag form, or in compacted cake form. If you’re using leaves, add a teaspoon to a cup of freshly boiled water and let it steep for about 20 seconds before you pour off the water; this process id called rinsing, in order to prepare the leaves for the tea. Next, pour freshly boiled water again, let it steep for 30 seconds or one minute. This will give the tea a mild, but pleasant flavor. If you want a stronger flavor, you can let it steep up to 50 minutes, until it turns as dark as coffee. Pu’erh leaves can be resteeped several times (4-8 times). Just add about 20 more seconds to each steeping process. The same applies to pu’erh tea in compacted cake form. To get the leaves, either flake off pieces of the cake, or steam the entire cake until it becomes soft. Pu’erh Tea Benefits Pu’erh tea had important health benefits related to blood circulation. It can help lower blood cholesterol levels. It also boosts the flow of blood and enhances your blood circulation. Drinking pu’erh tea can help prevent cancer, as it helps prevent the formation and growth of cancer cells. It also promotes a proper, healthy digestion, and is good for your spleen. You don’t have to worry even if you’re on a diet; drinking pu’erh tea will help you lose weight, as it breaks down and reduces the fat in your body. As pu’erh tea contains caffeine, drinking it helps keep you alert and focused. It also helps with removing toxins from your body, and it can prove to be useful if you’re dealing with various aches and pains. Pu’erh tea can also help you if you’ve got a hangover, especially if you get a headache. Also, it can act as a substitute for coffee, and can have a relaxing effect on you. Pu’erh Tea Side Effects Because of its caffeine content, pu’erh tea shouldn’t be consumed by pregnant or breastfeeding women, as it can affect the baby. Also, you shouldn’t drink pu’erh tea if you’ve got anxiety, bleeding disorders, heart problems, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, glaucoma, high blood pressure or osteoporosis. It can affect your condition in all of these cases. Pu’erh tea can also interact with medications. A few examples include amphetamines, cimetidine, ephedrine, adenosine, or medications for depression, asthma and slow blood clotting. The list includes more, so if you’re under medication, make sure you check with your doctor first, to see if it’s safe to drink pu’erh tea.   Pu’erh tea has important health benefits, though the same goes for side effects, as well. Make sure it’s safe to drink pu’erh tea, and then you can enjoy a cup of tea without having to worry about its side effects.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

In?ammation of the kidney (see KIDNEYS), usually the result of bacterial infection. The in?ammation may be acute or chronic. Acute pyelonephritis comes on suddenly, is commoner in women, and tends to occur when they are pregnant. Infection usually spreads up the URETER from the URINARY BLADDER which has become infected (CYSTITIS). Fevers, chills and backache are the usual presenting symptoms. ANTIBIOTICS should be given, and in severe cases the intravenous route may be necessary. SEPTICAEMIA is an occasional complication.

Chronic pyelonephritis may start in childhood, and the usual cause is back ?ow of urine from the bladder into one of the ureters – perhaps because of a congenital deformity of the valve where the ureter drains into the bladder. Constant urine re?ux results in recurrent infection of the kidney and damage to its tissue. Full investigation of the urinary tract is essential and, if an abnormality is detected, surgery may well be required to remedy it. HYPERTENSION and renal failure may be serious complications of pyelonephritis (see also KIDNEYS, DISEASES OF).... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Red Ginseng Tea is extracted from a human-shaped perennial plant originating from China and Korea, where its root has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years. The Chinese considered that ginseng tea had the power to prolong life and cure a variety of diseases. Red ginseng teais obtained from the unpeeled dried ginseng root which has undergone a steaming process and thus turned reddish-brown. Red Ginseng Tea brewing The red ginseng tea steeping process requires a minimum of five minutes which allows the extraction of the best ingredients from the plant root with healing properties. The ideal brewing temperature is eighty degrees Celsius. It is best served with honey. Red Ginseng Tea health benefits For centuries, red ginseng tea has been used to raise mental alertness and avert tiredness. The root of the plant is full of beneficial minerals and vitamins, as well as essential oils and natural enzymes. Red ginseng tea has both a stimulating and calming effect on the mind, it reduces stress, it improves blood circulation, digestion and the respiratory function. In addition, the immune system is strenghtened. Red ginseng tea consumption is also related to an increased metabolic rate, which leads to a faster weight loss process. Furthermore, research shows that one of the health benefits of red ginseng tea includes its cancer-preventive properties and its potential ability to treat Lyme disease. Red Ginseng Tea side effects Red Ginseng Tea is generally known to have no or only mild side effects which are usually the result of excessive tea consumption - it is therefore advisable to have a moderate tea intake and to seek advice from a health expert first. Some of these side effects include insomnia, nausea, headaches, anxiety, high or low blood pressure, irregular heartbeat or digestive problems. It is not recommended to consume red ginseng tea along with other medication, because it can interact with it and lead to unpleasant side effects. The consumption of red ginseng tea should mainly be avoided by children, pregnant women, people with diabetes, blood pressure poblems or those affected by prostate, uterine, ovarian or breast cancer. Red Ginseng Tea is sweet, tasty and has a stimulating effect, giving you the boost you need throughout the day. You can now enjoy a delightful cup of tea and benefit from its tremendously positive effects.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Rooibos tea is a largely consumed beverage, due to its medicinal properties dealing with weak bone structure, insomnia or even stomach ailments. Rooibos Tea description Rooibos is a plant belonging to the legume family which grows in South Africa. This plant is used to prepare Rooibos tea (also known as bush tea or redbush tea). The beverage is known for centuries in Southern Africa and nowadays, it is consumed in many countries. Fermentation by analogy (the process through which the leaves are oxidized) renders its reddish-brown color and enhances its flavor. Rooibos Tea brewing To prepare Rooibos tea:
  • use spring water or filtered water
  • brew Rooibos tea leaves in heartily boiling water: one heaping teaspoon of tea leaves per eight ounces (one cup) of water
  • steep it five to ten minutes
  • keep the water hot the entire time the leaves are steeping
Milk, sugar or honey can be added to the resulting beverage. Rooibos Tea benefits Rooibos tea has been successfully used to:
  • treat irritability,headaches, disturbed sleeping patterns, insomnia, nervous tension, mild depression or hypertension
  • relieve stomach cramps
  • relieve colic in infants
  • relieve stomach and indigestive problems like nausea, vomiting, heartburn, stomach ulcers and constipation
  • supplement the daily amounts of calcium, manganese and especially fluoride for the development of strong teeth and bones
  • relieve itching and certain skin irritations like eczema, nappy rash and acne (when directly applied to the affected area)
Rooibos Tea side effects Rooibos tea is not recommended to pregnant and nursing women. Also, it is recommended to ask your doctor before consuming this type of tea. Rooibos tea is a healthy beverage used to treat a large array of diseases such as skin-related issues, indigestion, disturbed sleeping patterns, but not only.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

Rubella, or German measles, is an acute infectious disease of a mild type, which may sometimes be di?cult to di?erentiate from mild forms of MEASLES and SCARLET FEVER.

Cause A virus spread by close contact with infected individuals. Rubella is infectious for a week before the rash appears and at least four days afterwards. It occurs in epidemics (see EPIDEMIC) every three years or so, predominantly in the winter and spring. Children are more likely to be a?ected than infants. One attack gives permanent IMMUNITY. The incubation period is usually 14–21 days.

Symptoms are very mild, and the disease is not at all serious. On the day of onset there may be shivering, headache, slight CATARRH with sneezing, coughing and sore throat, with very slight fever – not above 37·8 °C (100 °F). At the same time the glands of the neck become enlarged. Within 24 hours of the onset a pink, slightly raised eruption appears, ?rst on the face or neck, then on the chest, and the second day spreads all over the body. The clinical signs and symptoms of many other viral infections are indistinguishable from rubella so a precise diagnosis cannot be made without taking samples (such as saliva) for antibody testing, but this is rarely done in practice.

An attack of German measles during the early months of pregnancy may be responsible for CONGENITAL defects in the FETUS (for information on fetal abnormalities, see under PREGNANCY AND LABOUR). The incidence of such defects is not precisely known, but probably around 20 per cent of children whose mothers have had German measles in the ?rst three months of the pregnancy are born with congenital defects. These defects take a variety of forms, but the most important ones are: low birth weight with retarded physical development; malformations of the HEART; cataract (see under EYE, DISORDERS OF); and DEAFNESS.

Treatment There is no speci?c treatment. Children who develop the disease should not return to school until they have recovered, and in any case not before four days have passed from the onset of the rash.

In view of the possible dangerous e?ect of the disease upon the fetus, particular care should be taken to isolate pregnant mothers from contact with infected subjects. As the risk is particularly high during the ?rst 16 weeks of pregnancy, any pregnant mother exposed to infection during this period should be given an intramuscular injection of GAMMA-GLOBULIN. A vaccine is available to protect an individual against rubella (see IMMUNISATION).

In the United Kingdom it is NHS policy for all children to have the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (see MMR VACCINE), subject to parental consent. All women of childbearing age, who have been shown by a simple laboratory test not to have had the disease, should be vaccinated, provided that the woman is not pregnant at the time and has not been exposed to the risk of pregnancy during the previous eight weeks.... Medical Dictionary

Indian Medicinal Plants

Linn. (European BlackBerry, European Bramble, known as Vilaayati Anchhu) is cultivated in the valley of Kashmir and in Assam and Tamil Nadu up to 2,000 m. A decoction of the root is used for dysentery and whooping cough. The plant gave a triterpenic acid, rubitic acid, characterized as 7 alpha-hydroxyursolic acid.

Key application: Rubus fruticosus leaf—in nonspecific, acute diarrhoea, mild inflammation of the mucosa of oral cavity and throat. (German Commission E.)

Rubus rugosus Sm. synonym R. moluccanus auct non Linn., (known as Kalsol in Kumaon) is found in Central and Eastern tropical and temperate Himalaya from Nepal to Sikkim and in Assam. The plant contains triter- penes, also afforded rubusic acid and beta-sitosterol; leaves gave tormentic acid. Leaves exhibit astringent, emme- nagogue and abortifacient properties.

Rubus niveus Thunb. (Mysore Raspberry, Mahabaleshwar Raspberry) is common in evergreen forests of Ma- habaleshwar.

European Raspberry is equated with Rubus idaeus Linn. The leaves contain flavonoids, mainly glycosides of kaem- pferol, quercetin and tannins. Raspberry leaf tea has been used in Europe to facilitate child birth. Its uterine relaxant effects have been demonstrated in animals (the extract appears to effect only the pregnant uterus, no activity has been observed on the non- pregnant uterus).

The leaves of European Raspberry (Rubus idaeus) and other species exhibit astringent, carminative and spasmolytic activity. Leaves are used for painful and profuse menstruation and, as mentioned earlier, for making parturition easier. An infusion is used for bowel complains, also as a blood purifier. Leaves contain ascorbic acid (about 80 mg/100 g). Polyphenol content of the fruit (methanolic extract) exhibited scavenging and antilipo-peroxidant activities.

Rubus idaeus has been introduced into India and is cultivated on a small scale in South Indian hill stations.

The leaf of Rubus idaeus has been included among unapproved herbs by German Commission E, as its efficacy has not been documented.... Indian Medicinal Plants

Beneficial Teas

Schizandra tea is a pleasant herbal tea, slightly bitter but not too much. Just like many herbal teas, this one has plenty of health benefits. Find out more about schizandra tea. About Schizandra Tea Schizandra tea is made from the berry of the Schisandra chinensis plant. This is a deciduous woody vine which grows in the forests of Northern China and the Russian Far East, where they have shade and moist and a well-drained soil. It belongs to a dioecious species; therefore, the flowers on a female plant will only produce fruit when they are fertilized with pollen from a male plant. The berry has a sweet, salty, bitter, hot and sour taste; this gives the berry its name, “five flavor berry”. How to prepare Schizandra Tea To enjoy a cup of schizandra tea, add 2-4 tablespoons of dried schizandra berries to a pot of boiling water; the pot should have enough water for two cups, initially. Reduce the heat and leave the berries in the hot water for about 12 minutes, or until the water that’s left is enough for only one cup. Strain and your cup of schizandra tea is ready! You can sweeten schizandra tea with honey or fruit juices (especially lemon). Schizandra Tea Constituents Schizandra tea gets many active constituents from its main ingredient, the “five flavor berry”. These lead to the many health benefits of schizandra tea. This tea has a high concentration of lignans, and also includes beta-sitosterol, gomisin, and schisandrin. Besides these, it is also rich in phytoestrogens, minerals, vitamins and essential oils. Schizandra Tea Benefits Schizandra tea can be used to treat liver problems; hepatitis is an example, as it reduces blood levels of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, an enzyme which can damage the liver. It is also included in the treatment of coronary heart diseases, skin disorders, and various infections. Drinking schizandra tea has a relaxing effect, as it sedates the nervous system and this way, fights against insomnia and irritation. It also improves your memory, brain efficiency, and reflexes. Schizandra tea can prevent both premature aging and motion sickness. It can help treat eyesight problems, and might even improve night vision. It is also useful to drink it if you’ve got problems with high blood pressure. Also, combined with other herbs (ginger, wormwood, bupleurum), it is often used in the fight against Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Schizandra Tea Side Effects Schizandra tea shouldn’t be consumed by pregnant women. It might cause the uterus to contract, which can lead to unwanted miscarriages. Also, it is recommended not to drink it if you’re breastfeeding, as it might affect the baby. Persons who have epilepsy shouldn’t drink schizandra tea, either. It is said that it might stimulate the central nervous system. Also, you shouldn’t drink schizandra tea if you know you’ve got problems with gastroesophageal reflex disease, peptic ulcers, or intracranial pressure. With the first two, it can worsen your condition by increasing stomach acid. With intracranial pressure, it can worsen it just like in the caseof epilepsy: by possibly stimulating the central nervous system.   Schizandra tea can work as an ideal everyday hot beverage. If you make sure the side effects don’t affect you, then you can enjoy this tea for its health benefits.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Shatavari tea is the main remedy if you suffer from sexual problems. Some say that Shatavari is the most important herb in Ayurvedic medicine. For centuries, the Indians used its roots and rhizomes to treat and even cure some of the most important health problems. Shatavari is a plant with sharp and shiny leaves, white flowers and dark fruits that grows in the rocky areas of the high plains in India, but also in the Himalayan region. Shatavari tea properties Shatavari means “a woman who has a hundred husbands ” because it is well known that this plant is used to treat the female reproductive system and not only: it can also be used for men’s wellness (combined with ashwagandha, makes a great male reproductive treatment and a very good sexual endurance enhancer). Also, the sweet roots of Shatavari could very well replace any meal , turning this particular herb into a “superfood” for women. And let’s not forget the fact that it is also a good remedy for stress, a well-known antioxidant and a great help when it comes to anti-aging solutions.  Treatments- Shatavari tea benefits Shatavari tea is useful for chronic fever and dehydration, ulcers and gastritis, dysentery and diarrhea, infertility, it helps fighting heart problems and calming the nerves. The good news is that you can take it even if you’re pregnant. In fact, Shatavari is a very good galactologue, so it actually helps with lactation (but do not drink too much or it will quickly cause leaking). Also, Shatavari tea helps with menstrual and menopausal problems and strengthens the female reproductive system. How to make Shatavari Infusion First thing you need to do is make sure the roots and rhizomes you’re about to use are clean and very dry. Simmer them in hot water for 15 minutes. For better results, wait another 15 minutes for the wellness benefits of Shatavari tea to be infused and you’ve got your own medicine cabinet in a pot. Take the Shatavari tea once or twice a day. Shatavari tea side effects If you’re sensitive to asparagus, you’ll be sensitive to Shatavari tea as well so it is better to avoid it. The same advice goes for patients with edema due to kidney disorder or impaired heart function. Another aspect you should really keep an eye on is your weight: a well balanced diet will prevent you from gaining weight while taking the tea. Shatavari tea- Contraindications Do not take Shatavari tea in case you have massive fibrocystic breasts or estrogen induced problems. To make sure everything will be fine, talk to your doctor before starting the treatment. It’s not hard to imagine why the Indians named this plant the most important herb of the Ayurvedic medicine: great benefits, few side effects. So, if you are looking for something to boost your energy and health really fast, look for Shatavari tea next time you’re in a tea shop.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Shepherd’s Purse tea is made from a medicinal plant used traditionally in easing menstrual symptoms, treating water retention, dysentery and eye afflictions. It has the property of enhancing coagulation and constricting blood vessels. The plant has small white flowers, pointed, arrow-shaped leaves and gets its name from the resemblance of its heart-shaped seed-pouches with an old-fashioned leather purse. Shepherd’s Purse Tea Brewing In order to brew Shepherd’s Purse tea, you must bring 300 ml of water to a boil, add 10 grams of the herb and let it steep for 30 minutes, then drain it. Shepherd’s Purse Tea Health Benefits Shepherd’s Purse tea is reputed for its ability to stop internal and external bleeding. In Europe, people have been using the beverage to stop stomach haemorrhage and to treat urinary tract bleeding. Midwives used it to prevent post-partum bleeding. Shepherd’s Purse tea has anti-inflammatory properties which may account for its traditional use in the treatment of haemorrhoids and wounds. Shepherd’s Purse tea is also an effective natural remedy for blood pressure problems or irregular heartbeat. It can be applied externally on wounds and burns. Shepherd’s Purse Tea Side Effects There are no reported side effects ofShepherd’s Purse tea consumption, but it is advisable to ask the opinion of a specialist before drinking it, especially if you are taking any medications. Excessive intake of this beverage may interfere with blood pressure and thyroid drugs. Pregnant women are not advised to consume Shepherd’s Purse tea, because it can cause uterine contractions and miscarriage. People suffering from kidney or liver diseases should also avoid Shepherd’s Purse tea.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Skullcap tea gets its name from the perennial herb shaped like a human skull, native to North America. Skullcap tea has been used for centuries as a natural and effective sedative and nerve tonic which relieves fear, anxiety and promotes relaxation. Skullcap Tea Brewing Skullcap teabrewing should be made with water that is not too hot, because otherwise it will spoil the tea and its benefits will not be fully enjoyed. The infusion will last three to five minutes. Skullcap tea has a pleasant taste which will make you perceive it less like a medicinal sleeping aid. Skullcap Tea Health Benefits Skullcap tea has a wide range ofbeneficial effects on the human body. It has been used as a sedative for centuries and nowadays been proven effective as a cure for insomnia, anxiety and headaches. Skullcap tea has a calming effect which soothes stress, muscle spasms, menstrual cramps and other problems that require the use of a remedy with sedative properties. Skullcap tea consumption may also be useful as a complimentary treatment method for more serious illnesses such as bladder and liver cancer, asthma, arthritis, gout or allergies. Research suggests that the tea could be beneficial for the prevention of heart diseases and strokes as well. Skullcap Tea Side Effects Excessive Skullcap tea intake may lead to unpleasantside effects such as irregular heartbeat, mental confusion, slow responsiveness to stimuli and even seizures. Skullcap tea should not be consumed with other with other medications that have the same relaxing effects because it may enhance their sedation properties and it is not recommended for pregnant or nursing women. Patients suffering from spleen, liver or stomach problems and diabetics should avoid Skullcap tea. It is advisable to consult a doctor prior to adding skullcap tea to your dietary plan. Sleep is essential for the well-being of our body. Drinking Skullcap tea nightly before bed when you feel the need of easing your mind or calming your nerves will work miracles. You will turn off your brain and enjoy a good night’s sleep!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Slippery Elm Tea is made from the inner bark of a tree that typically grows in the eastern part of North America and it has been used as medicine for centuries.Slippery Elm Tea contains mucilage, a gel-like substance that has the property of soothing pain, irritation and inflammation. Slippery Elm Tea Brewing The reddish sticky inner bark of Slippery Elm Tea si dried and powdered. In order tobrewthe tea, you must boil two cups of water in which you will stir four grams of powdered slippery elm and allow it to steep for about five minutes. Slippery Elm Tea Health Benefits Slippery Elm Tea has many beneficial effects. Due to its mucilage content, it can lessen the effects of gastrointestinal disorders like upset stomach and heartburn. It also protects the esophagus from acid damage caused by acid reflux. The antioxidant content ofSlippery Elm Teamakes it extremely beneficial in easing the inflammation caused by bowel disorders such as ulcerative colitis, which produces highly unpleasant symptoms, including diarrhea, cramping bloody stools and pain.   Slippery Elm Tea is also effective in treating coughs, respiratory irritations and sore throats. It can also be used externaly to smoothen and soften the skin or to treat certain skin conditions, wounds or burns. Slippery Elm Tea Side Effects Research shows that the components of Slippery Elm Tea display a low risk of side effects or toxicity, but it is not advisable to drink it along orally administered medications, as it may interfere with their absorption and weaken their efficiency. As a countermeasure, you can drink the tea two hours before or after administering the medications. Despite its numerous benefits, Slippery Elm Tea is not recommended as treatment for serious diseases such as bronchitis and cancer. Slippery Elm Tea can be safely consumed by pregnant or nursing women and by children. You can drink Slippery Elm Tea three times a day. It is a nutritious beverage that will considerably contribute to your well-being.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Spikenard Tea is the best solution if you are suffering from asthma, coughs or headaches. Spikenard is a perennial bush with large, green leaves, red berries and greenish white flowers. It grows mainly on the American continent and it’s been used for medical purposes since the 15th century, when the Native Americans used it to treat childbirth pains or coughs. Spikenard Tea can also be turned into a very consistent balm to treat bone fractures, wounds and cuts. Spikenard Tea Properties Spikenard Tea has anti-inflammatory properties, so it’s an excellent remedy for topical pains, such as localized irritations or earache. It’s versatility towards any type of health condition makes Spikenard one of the most important herbs in the Native American alternative medicine. Spikenard Tea is rich in tannis, volatile oil and diterpene acids, which help your system restore its health and vitality. Spikenard Tea Benefits Spikenard Tea contains depurative and anti-septic substances, often being used to clean and sanitize the blood. However, its action areas are many: headaches, asthma, cough, gas, pains, deafness, gout, syphilis. Also, Spikenard Tea is a great tonic that can really work miracles in case you need to induce sweating. A decoction made of Spikenard can bring relief to menstrual pains, burn injuries and backaches. If you suffer from tuberculosis, a cup of Spikenard Tea every day can really make a difference. It’s also good for detoxifying your body, and a compress of Spikenard Tea, applied on an eczema, will calm down the pain and make the irritation disappear. In North America, Spikenard Tea has also a culinary use: people make jelly out of it, which, if you think about it, it’s not a bad idea at all! Who wouldn’t want a jar of jelly that can bring joy both to your tongue and your general health? How to make Spikenard Tea Infusion Preparing Spikenard Tea is very easy. Take a handful of spikenard roots and add it to the boiling water in the teapot and let it infuse for about 5 minutes. For more energy and better results, wait for another 5 minutes and drink it sugar free. You can drink it hot or keep it in your refrigerator for not more than a week. In time, the tea loses its curative properties and health benefits. It is better to prepare a new bottle of tea every 3 or 4 days. Spikenard Tea Side Effects When taken properly, Spikenard Tea has no side effects. However, make sure you are not allergic to any of its ingredients and don’t drink more than 4 cups a day. Spikenard Tea is a medicinal treatment and it can’t replace coffee, unlike other teas, such as spearmint tea. Spikenard Tea Contraindications Don’t take Spikenard Tea if you are pregnant and it’s best to avoid it if you are breast-feeding. If you are pregnant and still thinking about taking it, talk to your doctor first. Other than that, there’s no reason not to add Spikenard tea to your herbal treatments cabinet. Follow the instructions and enjoy the great benefits of this tea!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

Stem CELLS develop a few days after an egg (ovum) is fertilised by a spermatozoon and starts developing to form an EMBRYO. These master cells are crucial to the development of a normal embryo. They contain a specialised ENZYME that gives them the facility to divide inde?nitely, developing into the many di?erent specialised cells that comprise the various tissues in the body – for example, skin, blood, muscle, glands or nerves.

In a highly signi?cant advance in research, a scienti?c team in the United States obtained stem cells from newly formed human embryos

– donated by women who had become pregnant after successful in vitro fertilisation – and successfully cultivated these cells in the laboratory. This achievement opened the way to replicating in the laboratory, the various specialised cells that develop naturally in the body. UK government legislation constrains the use of human embryos in research (see ETHICS) and the ethical aspects of taking this stem-cell culture technique forwards will have to be resolved. Nevertheless, this discovery points the biological way to the use of genetic engineering in selecting di?erentiated specialised cells from which replacement tissues could be grown for use as transplants to rectify absent or damaged tissues in the human body.

Research into potential use of stem cells has raised expectations that in the long term they may prove to be an e?ective regenerative treatment for a wide range of disorders including PARKINSONISM, ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE, type-2 diabetes (see under DIABETES MELLITUS), myocardial infarction (see HEART, DISEASES OF), severe burns, osteoporosis (see under BONE, DISORDERS OF) and the regeneration of blood to replace the need for BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT. Recent research has shown that adult stem cells may also be stimulated to produce new cell lines. If successful, this would eliminate the need to use embryos and thus resolve existing ethical dilemmas over the use of stem cells.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Stevia Tea is made from a green plant native to Paraguay with nutritious leaves up to 30 times sweeter than cane sugar. Stevia Tea contains numerous vitamins and nutrients and it has no calories, but its sweet taste reduces the craving for sweets and aids in the weight loss process. It does not adversely affect the blood sugar level and it can be enjoyed by both diabetics and obese people. Stevia Tea Brewing Stevia Tea can be added to other teas as a replacement for artificial sweetners. Pour one cup of unboiled hot water or other type of beverage over the Stevia Tea bag and let it steep for about three to five minutes. You can serve it hot or iced. If you use Stevia leaves to prepare your Stevia Tea cup, all you need to do is pour hot water over a couple of leaves and it will be ready in only a few minutes. There is no need to add sugar or honey because of its natural sweetness which serves as the perfect substitute. Stevia Tea Health Benefits Stevia, also called “honeyleaf” or “sweet herb”, is considered a miracle plant due to its health restoring benefits. Its leaves contain numerous beneficial minerals which include calcium, zinc, potassium and carbohydrates, as well as A and C vitamins. Stevia Tea can be used as an aid in the treatment of diabetes, high blood pressure and heartburn. Other health benefits of Stevia Tea include the improvement of digestion, oral health and hygene. The water based stevia concentrate has alo been used for treating skin conditions such as acnea. It is beneficial in skin care, having a smoothing and softening effect. Stevia Tea Side Effects The reportedside effects of Stevia Tea include dizziness, nausea and bloating, numbness and mild muscle pain, but none of them were long-lasting. Stevia may interfere with the blood sugar level, potentially lowering it, but caution is advisable among people with diabetes. Patients who already have a low blood pressure should avoid it because another effect of Stevia Tea is lowering the blood pressure. Although there are no long-term side effects, it is recommended that pregnant and nursing women avoid it also until more conclusive research is conducted. Sweetening your tea with stevia will bring your cup a delighful taste, without any unpleasant aftertaste. Enjoy a nice sweet cup of Stevia Tea and benefit from its nutritional value and extraordinarily valuable health effects!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Stone Root Tea comes from a strong herb mainly used to treat kidney issues, but it is also renowned for its improvement in the heart function. Drink a pleasant Stone Root Tea cup to strengthen your heart and feel your body lighter and healthier. Description of Stone Root Tea Stone root is a perennially growing herb, which belongs to mint family; it bears a potent lemon aroma and it is native to North America. Benefits of Stone Root Tea Stone Root Tea is used as a diuretic in removing excess fluids from the body. It can treat urinary tract problems including bladder pain and swelling stones in the kidney. Therefore it is great in increasing urine flow that results in relieving water retention. It is also known that people use Stone Root Tea to treat stomach ache and intestinal problems like indigestion. Sometimes, Stone Root Tea is effective in the treatment of headaches, hemorrhoids, laryngitis, pharyngitis or even dysentery. Moreover, Stone Root Tea has a tonic action making it effective in atonic conditions of the heart muscles, on the walls of the veins and capillaries. Its fresh leaves can be used to heal cuts, bruises and sores. Side effects of Stone Root Tea Although Stone Root Tea is a perfect remedy for gastrointestinal and circulatory problems, it can bring some unpleasant side effects with it. Drank in large quantities can cause diarrhea, nausea, dizziness, painful urination, or stomach pain. Pregnant or nursing women should avoid taking this tea without the consult of their doctor. You should also use with caution if you have high blood pressure. Stone Root Tea is effective all the way, making your heart stronger and bringing relief in the whole body. No more pains and discomfort in your life, but more and more vitality. Stone Root Tea is making a change for you.   Stone Root Tea Benefits and Side Effects... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Strawberry tea is a refreshing summertime fruity beverage. The fruit is nutritious, tasty and low in calories, having an uplifting effect. Some of the most important strawberry ingredients include antioxidants, vitamins C, K, B5 and B6, magnesium and potassium, all of which bring numerousbenefits for the organism and strengthen our metabolism. Strawberry Tea Brewing Use fresh water heated at a temperature of 100 degrees Celsius and steep it for at least too or three minutes in order to extract the beneficial compounds and to attain the full flavour of delicious juicy strawberries. Strawberry tea is a tasty drink that can be consumed plain, but you may also add sugar or honey according to personal preferences. Strawberry Tea Health Benefits Strawberry tea consumption can bring many health benefits for the human body. Strawberries have an important nutritional value, containing vitamin C and folic acid, which enhances the production of healthy red blood cells. Another strawberry tea compound is calcium, which enhances the production of milk; therefore the drink is highly beneficial for nursing or pregnant women. Strawberry tea is effective in relieving the symptoms of certain skin conditions such as eczema. The tea made from strawberry leaves has been traditionally used in the treatment of dysentery and diarrhea. There is evidence that shows some strawberry tea compounds might aid in the lowering of cardiovascular disease and cancer risk. Strawberry Tea Side Effects Strawberry tea is not known to have any seriousadverse effects, but it may cause allergic reactions in people who are sensitive to the fruit. It is also advisable to consult a specialist if you are taking any blood-thinning medications, as their effectiveness may be increased by some strawberry compounds which can lead to more unpleasant side effects such as bleeding. You can enjoy a delightful cup of strawberry tea at any point throughout your day, but this enticing, fresh and aromatic drink goes well on your breakfast tray or along a delicious dessert.... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

A term applied in medicine to a substance used as a substitute for another. The term is also applied to a woman who agrees to become pregnant and give birth to a child on the understanding that she will give up the child to the parents who have contracted with her for the surrogacy arrangement. When in vitro fertilisation (IVF – see under ASSISTED CONCEPTION) proved successful, it became possible to transfer a fertilised egg to a ‘uterus of choice’. Arti?cial insemination of the potential surrogate mother using sperm from the putative ‘father’ is also practised. Surrogacy has thrown up a host of ethical and legal problems which have yet to be satisfactorily resolved.... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Sweet  Woodruff Tea it’s a perfect treatment for digestive and liver problems. It strengthens your heart and gives you an overall feeling of calmness and relief. Description of Woodruff Tea Sweet Woodruff Tea comes from a perennial plant known in botanical terms as Galium odorata asperula. The plant grows in shady areas and is spread all over Europe and Middle East. It is related to coffee and henna, bears small white funnel shaped flowers and has a vanilla-like aroma. If crushed or wilted, it releases a very sweet scent similar to fresh hay. The plant contains coumarins, flavonoids, vitamins A, C and K, acids and asperulin. Sweet Woodruff Tea Benefits Sweet Woodruff Tea provides lots of benefits since Middle Ages. Then it was used as a calmative, diuretic and antispasmodic treatment and people believed it can fight jaundice and regulate heart activity. When Benedictine monks created their own wine they used woodruff to flavor it. Its fresh leaves were applied on wounds and tea was a common use to ease stomach cramps. It is also used today to sooth any intestinal discomfort. Moreover, Sweet Woodruff Tea is drank to combat headaches or migraines. It is recognized as a good treatment in liver diseases and kidney stone. It can be mixed with wine or other alcoholic beverage to relax the body and prepare it for a goodnight sleep. Because of  ( Aici as schimba cu “Thanks to”, pentru vorbesti de ceva pozitiv) its wonderful scent, the plant can be used to refresh your room, perfume your clothes or linen. Sweet Woodruff Tea Side Effects Although Sweet Woodruff Tea usually does lots of good, it can also bring some side effects if drank in large quantities. It can produce dizziness, vomiting, and symptoms of poisoning. Pregnant women should not drink this tea or be used in conventional medicine for circulatory issues. Preparation of Sweet Woodruff Tea Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1 bag of Woodruff Tea. Steep for 5 minutes and strain. Preferably, drink 2 to 3 cups a day and it’s no need to sweeten it, because of (thanks to) its great aroma. Sweet Woodruff Tea valued for centuries for its tonic, diuretic and anti-inflammatory effects can bring a positive change in your life. Drink this extraordinary tea and put a smile of your face.... Beneficial Teas

Indian Medicinal Plants

Roxb.

Synonym: S. beddomei C. B. Clarke S. candolleana Brand.

Family: Symplocaceae.

Habitat: Throughout North and eastern India, extending southwards to Peninsular India.

English: Lodh tree, Sapphire Berry

Ayurvedic: Lodhra, Rodhra, Shaavara., Sthulavalkal, Trita, Pattikaa Lodhra, Shaabara Lodhra.

Unani: Lodh Pathaani.

Siddha/Tamil: Vellilethi, Velli- lothram.

Action: Bark—used as specific remedy for uterine complaints, vaginal diseases and menstrual disorders; menorrhagia, leucorrhoea (The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India); also used in diarrhoea, dysentery, vaginal ulcers, inflammatory affections and liver disorders.

The bark gave colloturine, harman (loturine) and loturidine. Stem bark gave proanthocyanidin-3-monogluco- furanosides of 7-O-methyl-and 4'-O- methyl-leucopelargonidin. Betulinic, oleanolic, acetyl oleanolic and ellagic acids are reported from the plant.

Glycosides, isolated from the ethanolic extract of the stem bark, are highly astringent and are reported to be responsible for the medicinal properties of the bark.

The bark extracts have been reported to reduce the frequency and intensity of the contractions in vitro of both pregnant and non-pregnant uteri of animals. A fraction from the bark, besides showing action on uteri, was spasmogenic on various parts of the gastrointestinal tract and could be antagonized by atropine.

The bark extracts were found to inhibit the growth of E. coli, Micrococcus pyogenes var. aureus, and enteric and dysenteric groups of organisms.

Dosage: Stem bark—3-5 g powder; 20-30 g for decoction. (API, Vol. I.)

S. laurina Wall., synonym S. spica- ta Roxb. (North and East Idia, Western and Eastern Ghats); S. ramosis- sima Wall. (the temperate Himalayas from Garhwal to Bhutan); S. sumuntia Buch.-Ham. (Nepal to Bhutan) are also equated with Lodhra.

The powdered bark is used in folk medicine for biliousness, haemorrhages, diarrhoea, dysentery and genitourinary diseases.

Symplocos theaefolia Buch-Ham. ex D. Don (the Eastern Himalayas from Nepal to Bhutan and in the Khasi Hills at altitudes between 1,200 and 2,500 m) is known as Kharanl in Nepal and Dieng-pei or Dieng-twe-pe in khasi.

The ethanolic extract of leaves showed hypoglycaemic activity in rats and anticancer activity against Friend- virus-leukaemia (solid) in mice. The extract of the leaves and of stems showed activity against human epider- moid carcinoma of the nasopharynx in tissue-culture.

The Wealth of India equated S. laurina with Lodh Bholica (Bengal) and S. sumuntia with Pathaani Lodh.

The wood of Symplocos phyllocalyx C. B. Clarke is known as Chandan and Laal-chandan. It should not be confused with Santalum album or Ptero- carpus santalinus.... Indian Medicinal Plants

Beneficial Teas

Tansy Tea is a very good and natural vermifuge, used mainly to treat children. Tansy is a perennial plant, with long narrow leaves and bright yellow flowers. Originally from Asia, Tansy is now grown all over the world and used for medical purposes, even if physicians all over the world are being reticent when it comes to recommending it to patients. For a very large amount of time, Tansy Tea was used in order to induce miscarriage and many women died drinking too much of it. Tansy Tea Properties The main substances of Tansy Tea (tanacetin, volatile oil, tannic acid, parthenolides)are toxic in large quantities, so if you’re thinking about starting a treatment based on Tansy Tea it’s best to keep track of how much you drink per day. The parts that can be used for medical purposes are the leaves and the flowering tops and you can either make a tea out of them or use the leaves freshly picked. Tansy Tea Benefits Although the main use of the Tansy Tea was to treat worms in children, the modern applications of the alternative medicine point towards using it as a cooking ingredient that can be added in small amounts to a variety of salads and omelets, thanks to its cinnamon-like taste. Tansy Tea can also be used as a natural cosmetic product able to lighten skin and decolorize the unwanted sunspots. Today, the medical uses of the Tansy Tea have been loudly discredited, although you can still find it on markets and it’s legal to grow it in your own yard. However, it’s safe and actually indicated that you use Tansy in order to keep your vegetables pest-free rather than buy some random chemical repellent. How to make Tansy Tea Infusion When preparing Tansy Tea Infusion, you need to make sure that the concentration is not going to do you any harm (use a very small amount). Poor boiling water over the Tansy leaves and wait for about 5 minutes. Only take the tea as long as you’re sick (not more than a cup per day) and do not turn it into a daily habit. Tansy Tea cannot replace coffee and it’s toxic in high dosages. If you’ve taken this tea for a while and there are still no results, see a doctor immediately and stop taking Tansy Tea! Tansy Tea Side Effects Tansy Tea has many side effects. In fact, few physicians are brave enough to prescribe Tansy tea to their patients. It can cause spasms, hallucinations, convulsions. In very high dosages, it can cause death. Tansy Tea Contraindications Do not take Tansy Tea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding under no circumstances! Also, a very strong cup of Tansy Tea can cause death. There have been many reported cases of young women who died after ingesting a concentrated solution of this tea. Before making any moves towards using Tansy leaves or flowers, ask your doctor about the risks. If Tansy Tea seems a bit strong for your organism, next time you’re looking for a natural repellent, take it into consideration. It’s a very cheap method that will keep all worms away from your delicious vegetables!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Tarragon Tea is best known for its ability to cure some forms of insomnia and other conditions of the nervous system, thanks to its strong aromatic flavor and substances. Although its use involves mainly the international cuisine, being added as an important ingredient to a variety of recipes, Tarragon is also good for health. Tarragon is a green perennial shrub with narrow leaves and lacking in hairs. It grows especially in the Northern hemisphere, in places like the United States, Asia and Siberia. It can easily be recognized by its small, yellow flowers. Tarragon Tea Properties Tarragon is the main ingredient in French salads and sauces that contain vinegar or as an old remedy for insomnia. The good thing about Tarragon Tea is that you can make it from the aerial parts of the plant as well as from its roots. This tea is very strong, containing tannis, coumarins and flavonoids, and up to 0.8% volatile oil, consisting of up to 70% methyl chervicol (estragole). The last substance is toxic and possibly carcinogenic, so pay attention to the amount of Tarragon you’re drinking or eating. Tarragon Tea Benefits Tarragon Tea is a great help if you’re suffering from arthritis, gout or rheumatism, experience flatulence and colic. In case you have worms, Tarragon Tea will flush them out of your system while calming your toothache and other localized pain. Actually, Tarragon Tea works as any other painkiller on the market and it’s natural! For menstrual problems, digestive track conditions and insomnia, this tea may come in hand: some say that half a cup of Tarragon Tea will make you sleep like a baby. However, don’t use a large amount of plants when preparing your tea or there’s a chance you’ll never wake up again! How to prepare Tarragon Tea Preparing Tarragon Tea couldn’t be any easier. Just turn boiling water over the dry or freshly picked Tarragon leaves and wait for about 5 minutes. You can drink it hot or cold, just make sure you don’t forget that this is a treatment used for your health and not an ordinary tea that could replace your morning coffee. Tarragon Tea Side Effects A long-term use of Tarragon Tea may cause cancer or even death because it contains a substance called estragole. If you’ve been drinking Tarragon Tea for a while and you’re experiencing dizziness or other nervous system problems, talk to your doctor right away! Tarragon Tea Contraindications Do not take Tarragon Tea if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. Also, if you’ve suffered from cancer in the past, it is best to consult your doctor before drinking Tarragon Tea or simply avoid taking it. Very important: if you’re allergic to ragweed and related plants, you’ll have an allergic reaction to Tarragon Tea as well. Make sure you’re well informed before starting a Tarragon Tea cure so you won’t get any problems. If you’are having trouble sleeping or need something to bring relief in case of menstrual pains, Tarragon Tea may be the right answer. However, if you’re not completely sure about it, talk to your doctor first and see which treatment fits you best. When he gives you the green light, add Tarragon Tea to your shopping cart and enjoy the wonderful benefits of this tea!... Beneficial Teas

Medical Dictionary

(Egyptian) In mythology, the goddess of pregnant women and childbirth Tawerett, Tawerette, Tawerete, Tauret, Taurett, Taurette, Taurete... Medical Dictionary

Beneficial Teas

Tea is the perfect choice for a breakfast beverage. Even if coffee might help you sober up, tea is healthier and much more natural. Find out more about teas for breakfast! Why drink tea for breakfast During winter, starting your day with a hot beverage is the best solution. Tea is a better choice than coffee; even teas that are made from the Camellia sinensis plant (which contains caffeine) have smaller caffeine content than a normal cup of coffee. With so many flavors, you are bound to find something that will suit your taste. You can choose the tea you want to drink based on possible health problems, as well. Also, during summer, you can start the day with a cool, refreshing glass of iced tea. Proper teas for breakfast Considering the many varieties of tea that exist all around the world, it’s hard to choose just one and say it is the best for breakfast. Tea choice differs from one person to another, based on each of our preferences. There are various blends which are often recommended during breakfast. Two of them are English Breakfast tea and Irish Breakfast tea. They are both black tea blends with quite high caffeine content. Generally, teas made from the Camellia Sinensis plant (black tea, green tea, oolong tea, and white tea) are often drunk during breakfast. They count as a natural replacement for coffee, thanks to their caffeine content. These teas for breakfast include Rooibos tea, Bai Hao oolong tea, Earl Grey tea, Assam tea, Ceylon tea, or Japanese green teas (sencha tea or matcha tea). It is recommended that children should not drink teas with caffeine content. In their case, fruit-flavored teas are the best choice for a hot, morning beverage. Benefits of teas for breakfast Each type of tea comes with its own health benefits, which should encourage you to enjoy a cup of warm tea every morning. Health benefits of teas for breakfast which have caffeine content include mental alertness. The caffeine found in tea helps us wake up and focus even during the early hours of the morning. Other health benefits of teas with caffeine content (made from the Camellia sinensis plant) are: reducing the risk of getting cancer, lowering high blood pressure, helping us lose weight. Side effects of teas for breakfast Just like health benefits, side effects also vary from one type of tea to another. However, the main ones are related to the caffeine content found in teas for breakfast made from the Camellia sinensis plant. Caffeine content can lead to headaches, nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeats, tremors, dizziness, ringing in the ears, or convulsions. Don’t drink any of these teas (black tea, green tea, white tea, oolong tea) if you know caffeine is not good for you. Also, it is recommended not to give any of these teas to children, pregnant women or those who are breastfeeding. In this case, choose an herbal or fruit-flavored tea. Though even in this case, make sure you talk to a doctor first, as they can have their own side effects, as well. Tea is definitely a must when taking breakfast. Whether cold during summer or hot during winter, it is the ideal beverage. No matter the flavor, enjoy your tea for breakfast!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Cellulite is a painless affection which consists of the fat layer growth. This is not very unusual and many women around the world suffer from it. Generally, cellulite is your body’s way of protecting your organism when you’re pregnant. On the other hand, you can develop cellulite from having a very unbalanced diet: unhealthy foods and drinks (sodas and fast food). Also, the lack of workout and exercise will slow your calories from burning, making them stick mostly to your hips and thighs. How Tea for Cellulite Works A Tea for Cellulite’s main purpose is to make your blood veins work properly and eliminate the lipids surplus. Also, their action implies veins dilatation and increased blood pressure so that your entire body will work to get rid of the unwanted fats. What you need to know about cellulite is that this is not regular fat and, at times, even thin women have it. Keeping a diet will not make it go away so don’t starve yourself to death! Efficient Tea for Cellulite When choosing a Tea for Cellulite, you must keep in mind a couple of facts: it must be very efficient and safe. Since having a cellulite will not hurt more than your feelings, alternative medicine practitioners advice against all pills that promise to work miracles on your body and recommend, instead, an herbal treatment. If you don’t know which teas to choose from, here’s a list to guide you on: - Horse Chestnut Tea – it has anti inflammatory properties. Its main active constituent, Aescin, improves your blood flow by decreasing the pore size of your capillary walls. This will make your skin look a lot smoother and reduce the cellulite level. - Ginkgo Biloba Tea – is a great vasodilator whose main goal is to improve circulation. This Tea for Cellulite will also stop cholesterol level from enhancing and it can be used to treat memory loss, stress, anxiety, headaches and anemia. However, don’t drink more than 3 cups per day or you’ll get diarrhea. - Green Tea – has blood thinning properties, so you must avoid it at all costs in case you’re already on regular blood thinners. A cup of Green Tea per day will also improve your general health and bring relief in case you’re suffering from infertility, anemia, headaches or stress. However, don’t take it if you’re on menopause or menstruation in order to avoid stomach irritations and uterine contractions. - Dandelion Tea – will enhance your liver’s ability to process lipids faster and energize your entire body. However, this Tea for Cellulite is also a strong diuretic and purgative so you may want to avoid it if you suffer from diarrhea or upset stomach. Also, too much dandelion tea might cause urinary tract infections. Tea for Cellulite Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day may weaken your digestive and nervous systems and lead to vomiting, nausea, headaches and even hallucinations. Before starting a treatment based on a Tea for Cellulite, talk to your doctor in order to find out which are the risks. Don’t take any of these teas if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners, anticoagulants or preparing for a surgery. Children shouldn’t be allowed to take an herbal treatment since there is no study to prove how safe it is for them. But if you have the green light from your doctor and nothing could interfere with your Tea for Cellulite cure, choose a tea that fits best your needs and enjoy its health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Constipation is a digestive tract problem which involves your body’s incapacity to eliminate the waste. Sometimes, constipation is a reaction to a series of a very unbalanced nutrition, which involved eating seeds and dried solid food. The lack of liquids makes your intestines unable to push the waste out of your body. Dehydration may also be a cause for constipation. Not treating your constipation may lead to blood in stools, internal bleeding and even ulcers. How Tea for Constipation Works If you’re suffering from constipation, it’s best to take teas that are well known for their diuretic and purgative action. The most important thing about these teas is that, thanks to their enzymes and nutrients, they increase the amount of liquid in your intestines, helping them eliminate the waste and irrigating the entire digestive tract. When choosing a Tea for Constipation, you may want to pick the safest one. Of course, the market is abundant in teas for constipation, but some of them have a high level of risk and, since constipation is a minor affection, it’s not really worth it. However, ask your doctor for guidance before starting any kind of herbal treatment in order to avoid other health complications. Efficient Tea for Constipation - Senna Tea – this tea is also helpful for colic, flatulence, fissures, hemorrhoids and gas, thanks to its active ingredients which take action in your digestive tract. Senna Tea is generally a safe Tea for Constipation, its main action consisting of increasing the abdominal muscle activity. However, don’t exceed more than 2 cups of tea per day and only take it while you’re feeling sick. - Licorice Tea – or Glycerrhiza Glabra Tea is a well known decoction used in order to treat a series of affections, such as constipation, blood pressure, heart failure, kidney disease or liver disorders. Licorice Tea has a sweet and pleasant taste so you don’t need to add any honey or lemon. - Yellow Dock Tea – has a bitter taste and therefore it’s used in combination with ginger, honey or lemon. Yellow Dock Tea has a mild laxative effect due to its active ingredients: tannins, oxalates and anthraquinones, so you shouldn’t take it if you’re suffering from liver or kidney disorders. Tea for Constipation Side Effects When taken according to specifications, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day may lead to a series of complications, such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and upset stomach. If you’ve been taking one of these teas for a while and you’re experiencing some unusual reactions, ask for medical help right away! Don’t take a Tea for Constipation if you’re also pregnant, breastfeeding, on anticoagulants and blood thinners or preparing for a surgery. The same advice if you’re suffering from kidney or liver problems. But if your doctor says it’s ok to start a medical treatment based on a Tea for Constipation, choose the one that fits you best and enjoy its great benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Cough is a response from your body to let you know that you have respiratory problems. Cough is very often associated with colds or pleurisy, but can also be triggered by both fungal and bacterial infections. At times, cough is consistent with phlegm, but you can also experience a very rare type of cough in which a virus makes your body think that you suffer from flu or colds. How a Tea for Cough Works A Tea for Cough’s main purpose is to dissolve the phlegm or make your body produce enough antibodies to fight all infections. Since cough is not a disease itself, you may want to try an herbal remedy before rushing to the drug store. However, not any tea is good for cough. When looking for a tea that could have a great effect on you and your body, you must keep in mind that you need a tea that’s both safe and very effective. Efficient Tea for Cough If you don’t know which teas to choose, here’s a list to guide you through: - Licorice Root Tea – brings relief to your bronchial tubes by stimulating your body to produce a thin layer of mucus and protect the membranes. You can also take it in case you’re suffering from other affections, such as menstrual and menopausal pains, stress, headaches, migraines and asthenia. - Marshmallow Root Tea – this Tea for Cough with a subtle Christmas scent can treat any respiratory system ailments, cleansing your body and inducing a state of relaxation. However, you must consult the specialist before taking this remedy in order to make sure everything will go as planned. - Sundew Tea – is also used as an anti-spastic and has anti-inflammatory properties. This particular Tea for Cough is rich in vitamins, minerals, volatile oils and nutrients and it’s good for any kind of problem that could affect your upper chest area. However, this is not a very safe tea and you should only take it while supervised. - Lemon Tea – make a decoction of lemons and drink it adding a hint of ginger, honey or mint in order to make it more pleasant. This is a good remedy for any auto-immune and inflammatory problems, starting with colds, flu and ending with sore throats. You may want to give it a try if you’re also suffering from loss of appetite, sleeplessness or asthenia. This tea can rejuvenate your skin and improve your general health in a heartbeat! Tea for Cough Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, high dosage may lead to a number of problems such as diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting or even hallucinations. Don’t take a Tea for Cough if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners (some of these teas will interfere with their action), anti coagulants or preparing for a surgery. When in doubt, always ask your doctor about the risks that an herbal remedy implies. If you have his permission and you’re feeling adventurous today, choose a Tea for Cough that fits you best and enjoy its health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Cramps are described as a strong abdominal pain that is due to a series of causes, starting with menstruation, menopause and ending with liver and kidney failure. Also, exercising too much can lead to muscular pains and painful muscular contractions. Generally, practitioners around the world recommend a pause and a number of traditional pain killers. But, since cramps is a temporary condition, alternative medicine fans vote for an herbal treatment. How a Tea for Cramps Works Basically, a Tea for Cramps’ main goal is to distress your entire body, not just the cramps, inducing a state of calmness to the affected areas. The main thing about these teas is that they can trigger a natural positive reaction from your body that will release endorphins, making you feel a lot better. Don’t use a massage for cramps under no circumstance! Cramps are caused by deep structures and massage will only give you a vomiting sensation. Efficient Tea for Cramps When choosing a Tea for Cramps, you must keep in mind the fact that it has to be both efficient and safe (you don’t want to aggravate your state or cause new problems thanks to this tea). If you don’t know which teas are appropriate for your condition, here’s a list to guide you: - Chamomile Tea – well known thanks to its anti inflammatory and astringent properties, this particular Tea for Cramps is also a great healer when it comes to many other disorders, such as nausea, stress, anxiety, menstrual and menopausal symptoms and even diabetes. It has a pleasant taste and a nice fragrance and it can easily become a daily habit since it’s one hundred percent safe. However, don’t drink more than 6 cups per day in order to avoid diarrhea. - Wild Yam Tea – it is very effective in treating pre and postmenstrual syndromes and it is responsible for your body’s positive response. Its action is very effective and rapid, but you must not take more than two cups per day in order to avoid other health complications. - Corn Silk Tea – can ameliorate any kind of localized pain, provide that you don’t forget this is a medical treatment and it could cause negative reactions. Since this Tea for Cramps is a powerful diuretic, make sure you do not exceed the number of cups recommended per day (this way, you will avoid diarrhea or uterine infections). - Raspberry Leaf Tea – also used to treat menstrual and menopausal pains, this tea is well known for its ability to treat infertility and other conditions of the female reproductive system. Thanks to its vitamin C level, Raspberry Leaf Tea can also treat auto-immune deficiencies, such as anemia, colds, or flu. Tea for Cramps Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, do not exceed the number of cups recommended per day and always ask your doctor’s advice before starting any herbal treatment. Do not take a Tea for Cramps if you are pregnant, on anti-coagulants or blood thinners. These teas may cause miscarriage due to their strong diuretic and purgative properties. If you have the medical approval and you feel like trying an herbal remedy this time, choose a Tea for Cramps that fits you best and enjoy its natural benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Diabetes is a common disease which implies the lack of insulin or the inappropriate use of insulin. The most popular type of diabetes is Type II Diabetes, in which insulin is produced (sometimes in quantities above the limit), but not used properly by the organism. The result is that your blood glucose level will be higher than normal, which means that you have to start a daily regime. If trying a Tea for Diabetes doesn’t seem too ineffective to you, follow our instructions and give it a try, provide that you are well informed before starting any type of treatment. How Tea for Diabetes Works Since your body’s reaction to the abnormality of insulin production is to increase the blood glucose, a very effective Tea for Diabetes’ first task is to lower your blood sugar and decrease your insulin level. That can only be possible thanks to a series of enzymes that work on your affected areas, bringing you relief from pain and improving your general health. What you must know is that this kind of teas cannot replace your traditional treatment, but only work as an adjuvant. Don’t give up on your pills to replace them with a tea in order to avoid a glucose crisis or even a coma. Efficient Tea for Diabetes If you’ve decided to go with a Tea for Diabetes, you can choose one from this list and give it a try: - Green Tea – as you probably know, Green Tea contains all the important nutrients capable to sustain life. It can treat a series of other diseases, but make sure you’re not on your period when taking a treatment based on Greet Tea. - Oolong Tea – a very efficient Tea for Diabetes, very rare, but which can work miracles on you and your health. If you find a provider specialized in Oolong Tea, hold on to it! - White Tea – has almost the same effect as Green Tea, but less contraindications. However, make sure you don’t exceed the number of recommended cups of tea per day in order to avoid digestive tract and nervous system complications. - Centaury Tea – a Tea for Diabetes that has been used as a great pain reliever since ancient times. This tea contains secoiridoids, alkaloids, phenolic acids, triterpenes, xanthone derivatives and triterpenes, used for homeopathic and digestive problems and also as a great adjuvant in Diabetes cases. - Ginseng Tea – also a very efficient decoction which can be useful for various affections, such as thinking improvement, speeding your reaction in time, increasing your resistance to stress and detoxifying your kidney and liver. In diabetes cases, its role consists mainly of normalizing your insulin production. - Wild Cherry Bark Tea – having probably the most pleasant taste of all Teas for Diabetes, Wild Cherry Bark Tea is very rich in nutrients and vitamins, such as vitamin C, b-complex and vitamin D. The main ingredients of this tea are Acetylcholine, HCN, kaempferol, p-coumaric acid, prunasin, scopoletin and tannins. It’s also good for bronchitis, pleurisy, colds or flu. - Yerba Mate Tea – probably the most efficient of these teas, Yerba Mate Tea is considered to be “the new green tea” thanks to its constituents. This tea is a great help in almost any affection, but you must be very careful when taking it. High dosages may lead to death! Tea for Diabetes Side Effects When taken according to specifications, these teas have no side effects and are generally safe. However, high dosages may lead to a number of health complaints, such as vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, hallucinations and even death. Talk to an herbalist or to your doctor before making any move! It’s best to be safe than sorry! Alos, do not take a Tea for Diabetes if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners and anti-coagulants or preparing for a major surgery.These teas could interfere with your anesthetic and lead to death! Once you have the green light from your doctor, choose a Tea for Diabetes that fits you best and enjoy its great benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Diarrhea is a digestive tract affection that contains of often liquid (sometimes even bloody) stools. This can be triggered by a number of causes, such as intestinal parasites, an unbalanced nutrition, menstrual and menopausal symptoms, uterine problems. Generally, doctors prescribe a diet and a medical treatment, but alternative medicine practitioners consider that diarrhea is not a severe health condition and that you should take an herbal treatment in order to protect your liver from the traditional drugs. The truth is that nowadays more and more doctors would rather prescribe a Tea for Diarrhea than a bottle of pills. The main inconvenience is that, even if teas are as effective as drugs, they have a slow response and you need to be patient before noticing an improvement. How Tea for Diarrhea Works Diarrhea appears mostly when your digestive tract enzymes are produced in a high quantity. A Tea for Diarrhea’s main goal is to decrease the enzymes production and get your organism on the right track. Their action is astringent and they work as a great inhibitor. However, this doesn’t mean that you don’t have to be on a regime. Drinking a Tea for Diarrhea while eating unsanitary food will not improve your condition. You may want to avoid sweet and greasy foods and try a diet based on rice. Efficient Tea for Diarrhea When choosing a Tea for Diarrhea, you must keep in mind the fact that is must be both efficient and one hundred percent safe. If you don’t know which those teas are, here is a list to choose from: - Peppermint Tea – thanks to its astringent constituents, this Tea for Diarrhea will improve your general health by inhibiting a negative response from your body. You can also use it if you’re suffering from colds, flu, anxiety, headaches and migraines, menstrual and menopausal pains. It has a pleasant taste and it’s one hundred percent safe. If you’re thinking about giving up coffee, Peppermint Tea might be the right alternative. - Chamomile Tea – of course, the world’s greatest panacea should never be forgotten! Take it if you are also suffering from diabetes, sore throats or experiencing unusual episodes, such as vomiting or nausea. Some say that it is also a good remedy for blond hair. - Bilberry Tea – although is very rich in vitamin C and it is generally used for auto-immune disease, this Tea for Diarrhea will give you enough strength to resist during the treatment. It will also bring relief if you’re suffering from conditions like pleurisy, pulmonary edema or colds. Tea for Diarrhea Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, don’t exceed the number of cups recommended per day in order to avoid other health complications. When in doubt, always talk to your doctor or to a specialist in order to gather more information. Do not take an herbal treatment based on a Tea for Diarrhea in case you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners, anti coagulants or preparing for a surgery. Since these teas have a diuretic and purgative property, it may cause uterine contractions. If you have your doctor’s approval and there’s nothing that could interfere with your treatment, choose a Tea for Diarrhea that fits you best and enjoy nature’s great benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Digestion problems have been a main interest for practitioners around the globe since ancient times. Even if traditional medicine found new ways to treat it, the most important remedies come from the alternative medicine. Digestion problems may be caused by an unbalanced nutrition, gastric problems or a series of other diseases which trigger digestive tract negative responses. If you’re suffering from indigestion and you want a natural remedy to treat your illness, pay attention to our advice and choose a Tea for Digestion that fits you best. How Tea for Digestion Works A Tea for Digestion’s main goal is to increase your digestive enzymes action and lower your acids level. Also, a strict regime will only do you good. Eating unhealthy food while taking a Tea for Digestion will only make your herbal treatment useless. However, if you’re willing to try a decoction based on a Tea for Digestion in order to treat your problems, it’s best to make sure that you’re not allergic to any of those ingredients. Efficient Tea for Digestion If you don’t know which Tea for Digestion fits best your needs, here’s a list to choose from: - Peppermint Tea – is well known for its use as a digestive tract adjuvant. When preparing Peppermint Tea, you can use both the leaves and the flowers and drink as much as you want (however, not more than 6 cups per day in order to avoid diarrhea). - Chamomile Tea – probably the most popular Tea for Digestion, Chamomile Tea is also used to treat a number of other affections, such as sleeplessness, gas, nausea, colds, flu, sore throats. Chamomile Tea acts as an antispasmodic, reducing gas aid, as a bowel movement stimulator or muscle relaxer. - Dandelion Tea – can be made from the dandelion roots which contain vitamins A, C, D and B-complex, and the minerals iron, potassium and zinc. This Tea for Digestion increases your urine production and your water secretion. Just make sure you don’t drink more than two cups per day, or it may cause diarrhea. - Green Tea – contains all the nutrients capable to sustain life and works as a rapid and very effective digestion treatment. However, don’t take it if you’re on your menstruation or experiencing menopausal symptoms or it may cause ulcers. - Chai Tea – is a mixture of many active constituents which work together in order to improve your general health and direct the antibodies to the affected areas. Chai Tea is probably the most interesting Tea for Digestion, since it is a mixture of tastes: sour, bitter, sweet, salt and spice. If you feel that it tastes a bit unpleasant, you can add ginger, honey or lemon. Tea for Digestion Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, high dosages may lead to a number of affections, such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting or upset stomach. If you’ve been taking a Tea for Digestion for a long time and you’re experiencing some unusual reactions, ask for medical help right away! Don’t start a treatment based on a Tea for Digestion if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners, anti-coagulants or preparing for a surgery. When in doubt, always ask your doctor for advice. Once you have your doctor’s approval and you know there’s nothing that could interfere with your herbal treatment, choose a Tea for Digestion that seems right for you and enjoy nature’s great benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Otalgia is more commonly known as ear pain or earache. The causes are many: colds, flu, pulmonary edema, pleurisy or a generalized body infection. Traditional medicine will send you right away to the pharmacy to buy antibiotics, but alternative medicine will advice against it. The amount of active constituents found in these teas could easily treat any kind of infection, not just ear infection, so you may want to give it a try before rushing to the drug store. How a Tea for Ear Infection Works A Tea for Ear Infection’s main purpose is to flush all infection triggers out of your system and prevent similar events from happening in the future. A tea that is rich in both minerals and acids is a great remedy! However, only use a treatment that fits you and your health, meaning is safe and very efficient. Also, a Tea for Ear Infection that is rich in manganese, magnesium, iron and tannins is a great choice. Just remember that all medical treatment must be taken under supervision! Efficient Tea for Ear Infection When choosing a Tea for Ear Infection, keep in mind that it must be one with an elevated safety level and a great efficiency. If you don’t know which teas to choose from, here’s a list to guide you on: - Garlic Tea – it’s true that it has a rather unpleasant taste and smell, but you don’t have to drink it if you don’t want to! Just pour a few garlic tea drops in your ear and wait 10 minutes for the natural benefits to be released. However, if you’ll be much more comfortable taking it as a drink, feel free to add ginger, mint, lemon or honey. Don’t take this decoction if you’re pregnant! - Ginger Tea – aside from its use as a great auto-immune adjuvant, this Tea for Ear Infection will flush out of your system all microbes and bacteria and heal the affected areas. You can also use it to treat anemia, asthenia, stress and severe migraines. Just be careful to use a small amount of herbs when preparing the decoction in order to avoid developing any acid foods and drinks intolerance. - Green Tea – will inhibit the mucus production and therefore decrease the infection triggers. Also, Green Tea is very rich in active constituents and scientists proved that it could sustain life on its own. You may give it a try in case you’re suffering from stress, anxiety, diarrhea or auto-immune problems. However, avoid it at all costs if you’re experiencing menstrual or menopausal symptoms! Tea for Ear Infection Side Effects When taken according to specifications, these teas are generally safe. However, drinking more tea than it’s recommended may lead to a series of health problems such as nausea, vomiting, upset stomach and skin rashes. Don’t start a treatment based on a Tea for Ear Infection if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding or suffering from a severe disease that would imply the ingestion of blood thinners and anti coagulants. Before starting an herbal treatment, ask your doctor’s opinion in order to be informed of the risks and make sure everything will be fine. Once you have his approval, choose a Tea for Ear Infection that fits best your problems and enjoy nature’s wonderful benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Edema is an affection in which the fluid gets trapped between the cell walls and which causes chronic pains and joint weakness. Edema may be caused by a number of things, such as standing too long or having an unhealthy diet, based on salty foods mostly. This is a common problem among pregnant women and, although in folklore there are many remedies, the traditional medicine advices against them. However, alternative medicine practitioners think that you shouldn’t avoid them and, on the contrary, give them a try and, if they don’t work, rush out to the pharmacy. How Tea for Edema Works A Tea for Edema’s main goal is to make all of your cells improve their action and flush away the unnecessary fluid. Of course, this requires ingesting a tea that has diuretic and purgative properties. If you’ve tried a tea to induce sweat or a decoction for constipation, you may want to take it again. The difference is that edema is a much serious condition and therefore needs to be treated more seriously. Efficient Tea for Edema When choosing a Tea for Edema, you must keep in mind two things: it must be safe and it must be one hundred percent safe (edema is a mild affection and you don’t want unnecessary complications). However, if you’re suffering from pulmonary edema (which is a water retention in your lungs), it’s best to ask for medical assistance right away. But if you don’t know which Tea for Edema fits best your condition, here’s a list to choose from: - Garlic Tea – it has a rather unpleasant taste and it doesn’t smell prettier either. You may want to add ginger, mint, lemon or honey to make it more adequate. This Tea for Edema will absorb all unwanted fluids and calm the affected areas. Don’t take more than 2 cups per day in order to avoid digestive tract complications. - Dandelion Tea – has purgative and diuretic properties thanks to which your body will be able to eliminate the water surplus and restore your original health. You can also take it to treat diarrhea, constipation or to induce sweat. - Bilberry Tea – not as popular as the other Teas for Edema, this wonderful decoction is very efficient, but not very safe. It’s true that you can see the results within days, but it’s best to talk to your doctor before making any move. Bilberry Tea is rich in acids and therefore it may cause uterine contractions. - Green Tea – in small dosages, Green tea can treat almost any affection. Be careful, though. It’s not recommended if you are experiencing some menstrual or menopausal symptoms. Green Tea is also a good remedy for asthenia, anemia, sore throats and general weakness. Tea for Edema Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day may cause diarrhea, headaches, vomiting and nausea. If you’ve been taking one of these teas for a while and you’re experiencing some unusual reactions, talk to your doctor immediately. Do not take a treatment based on a tea for Edema if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners or anticoagulants. The same advice if you’re preparing for a surgery. Once you have your doctor’s ok on the matter, choose a Tea for Edema that fits you best and enjoy its wonderful benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Eye infection is a general name for all ailments linked to your eye vision. Generally, these problems are bacterial or microbial and traditional medicine recommends a series of treatments, from creams to tinctures. However, before rushing out the door to buy all the expensive medications, you may want to give herbal remedies a try. They cost less and you don’t have to worry about putting your liver to hard work. How a Tea for Eye Infection Works A Tea for Eye Infection’s main goal is to stop all infection triggers and make your body produce enough antibodies to treat your immunity threats. In order to be efficient, a Tea for Eye Infection needs to show results quickly and be one hundred percent safe (some of the active constituents may interfere with your general health status. Before starting an herbal treatment, find out more about the risks and the side effects). Efficient Tea for Eye Infection A Tea for Eye Infection needs to contain the right amount of tannins, nutrients, volatile oils, acids and minerals (sodium, iron, magnesium and manganese). If you don’t know which teas contain the right amount of active constituents, here’s a list to choose from: - Black Tea – some say that it’s more effective than a lot of the antibiotics that can be found on the market. It’s very rich in acids and tannins and it can be useful for many other disorders, such as infertility, sore throats, colds, asthenia and anemia. However, don’t drink more than 2 cups per day for a short amount of time (one or two weeks) in order to avoid other health problems. - Green Tea – as scientists have proven, this Tea for Eye Infection contains all the ingredients necessary to sustain life. It’s useful for colds, flu, loss of appetite, but it’s best to avoid it in case you’re experiencing menstrual and menopausal symptoms (in high dosages, it might cause uterine contractions). - Chamomile Tea – of course, let’s not forget the world’s greatest panacea. This decoction has a pleasant taste and a lovely smell and it can be used for a series of affections, from flu and headaches to menstrual pains and even diabetes. Plus, Chamomile Tea it’s one hundred percent safe so you can drink as much as you want! Tea for Eye Infection Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day could cause uterine contractions, upset stomach, nausea and skin rash. If you’ve been taking one of these teas for a while and something doesn’t feel quite right, ask for medical assistance immediately! Don’t take a Tea for Eye Infection if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners, anticoagulants or preparing for a surgery. Also, children should not take one of these teas unsupervised. If your doctor says it’s ok to start an herbal treatment for your eye infection, choose a tea that fits best your requirements and enjoy nature’s great benefits!  ... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Fasting gain a big popularity among people around the world, during the past years, thanks to a number of alternative medicine adepts, which expressed their belief that fasting, every now and then, is good for your health. Although fasting is an ancient Christian habit, more and more people are adopting it as a way of life and less for its religious purpose. Some people see fasting as a way of losing weight and cleanse their body. When fasting, Christians don’t eat or drink anything but water. Health fasting means only eat or drink one type of food or drinks. Some people choose only to eat grapefruits, for example, some others only to drink tea. If this is your case, this article is for you. How Tea for Fasting Works First of all, not any tea can be used for fasting. You need to choose one with many health benefits and as many active ingredients as possible. Other than that, it must also be safe, since nothing else is ingested and your body needs to feed on something. Also, do not neglect your health by extending the fasting period or you will only starve yourself to death! Your diet must be a well-balanced one, in general, so when you’ve decided to try this type of body cleansing, make sure you take all the necessary measures of precaution so that this treat will only do you good. A Tea for Fasting’s main goal is to keep you energized during this rough time, providing your body with all the necessary supplements, starting from vitamins and ending with natural enzymes. Efficient Tea for Fasting When choosing a Tea for Fasting, you must keep in mind the fact that this one has to be both rich in nutrients and active constituents and one hundred percent safe (during the fasting, your body is very weak and the tea only provides a small quantity of immune defense). If you don’t know which teas are good for your purpose, here is a list to guide you: - Green Tea – is rich in vitamins and has the ability to keep you alive for several hours in which time your body will feel a lot better, rejuvenated and nourished. Also, if you have a cholesterol problem, this Tea for Fasting will lower its level and decrease your blood pressure. It’s an excellent tea if there are a couple of pounds you want to lose. - Yerba Mate Tea – considered “the new green tea” by the specialists, this Tea for Fasting contains all the active ingredients capable to sustain life. Although South Americans are very familiar to this tea, it remains yet unknown to the European public. However, if you find a teashop specialized in Yerba Mate, hold on to it! Make sure you do not drink too much, though! Yerba Mate Tea has a very powerful reaction and in high dosages may lead to death! Tea for Fasting Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day will lead to a number of complications, starting with diarrhea and upset stomach and ending with death. Do not take any of these teas for fasting f you are pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners or anti coagulant, or preparing for a major surgery. Some of these teas may interfere with your anesthetic and cause death. Talk to a specialist or to your doctor in order to gather more information and be aware of the risks. Once you have the medical approval, choose a Tea for Fasting that fits best your needs and enjoy its natural health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Chinese people consider the brain a priceless and irreplaceable possession. Its tranquility is very important, this being the reason why they have special rituals and treatments to enhance mental activity. There are several reasons for you to want a focused and concentrated mind: to save energy, time and to be more effective in daily activities, as well as to sharpen the memory and the five senses. How Tea for Focus works Tea for focus usually relaxes the nerves and treats the anxiety and agitation. Efficient Teas for Focus It has been proven that Theanine tea and Cacao tea are efficient teas for focus. Theanine is an adjuvant in the brain’s and nerves’s activities, acting as an enhancer for these processes. It also stimulates the brain’s chemical reactions. Theanine substances are also to be found in green tea . It is acknowledged for improving cognition, concentration and focus, having a long history in dealing with these mental states. It is recommended by Chinese traditional medicine and it is best known for its efficient treatments. Also, Theanine can reduce blood pressure as well as the symptoms of schizophrenia. To prepare Theanine tea, mix the L-theanine powder with water. Cacao fruit is originating from the tropical areas of America. It is best known for its sweet taste and strong lasting flavor. It can be enjoyed as a chocolate bar or as a beverage. Cacao increases the serotonin and endorphin levels. These two chemicals are responsible for enhancing the mood and elevating focus. To prepare Cacao tea, mix the powder with hot water and enjoy it whenever necessary. Tea for Focus: Side effects Teas for focus may lead to insomnia. Rarely, the syndrome of upset stomach has been noticed. Pregnant and nursing women should not take the beverages, as it may cause agitation to the baby. If any of these side effects occur, cease consumption and ask your doctor for advice. Tea for focus is a natural way to enhance mental activities, so as to be more efficient and effective when dealing with daily tasks. Also, they have a nice long-lasting flavor.  ... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Gallstones are solid accumulations that stick to your gallbladder due to impurities, kidney failure or other health problems. Usually, your doctor would prescribe a laser surgery to dissolve them, but many practitioners recommend an herbal treatment before sharpening their scalpels. You must also take into consideration the fact that the surgery is painful and expensive while the herbal treatment costs you nothing. How a Tea for Gallstones Works A Tea for Gallstones’ main goal is to trigger a positive response from your body and make it produce the enzymes necessary for the gallstones absorption. In order to do that, a Tea for Gallstones must contain the right amount of active constituents, such as acids, natural enzymes, tannins, nutrients and minerals (iron, sodium, manganese and magnesium are well known for their curative properties, especially when it comes to removing gallstones and other gallbladder affections). Efficient Tea for Gallstones When starting a treatment based on a Tea for Gallstones, you must keep in mind the fact that it must be both efficient and one hundred percent safe. Ingesting a small amount of tea every now and then will make your body produce all the necessary substances to fight the solid accumulations and heal the affected areas. However, drinking more tea than it’s advised will not make you healthy faster. Just take your time and wait for the treatment to be effective. If you don’t know which teas are good, here’s a list to choose from: - Green Tea –this Tea for Gallstones has all the ingredients necessary to sustain life, as the scientists have shown, so it’s good for a number of health problems, from sore throats to diabetes. Green Tea contains an elevated level of acids so it can dissolve your gallstones in no time. However, make sure you don’t take it if you’re experiencing menopausal or menstrual symptoms. - Milk Thistle Tea – contains an active ingredient called silymarin and it’s recommended for a wide range of affections which include gallstones and other kidney problems. However, don’t take more than 2 cups per day for a short time period (1 or 2 weeks) in order to avoid other health complications. - Globe Artichoke Tea – is very effective in all kidney problems, especially kidney failure and gallstones. This Tea for Gallstones contains antioxidants, such as caffeylquinic acids which has proven its curative properties in the past years. However, if you’re pregnant, you may want to talk to your doctor before making any move. Tea for Gallstones Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. Exceeding the number of cups recommended per day, however, might lead to a series of health complications, such as diarrhea, constipation, headaches, skin rash and even vomiting. If you’ve been taking one of these teas for a while and you’ve noticed some unusual reactions, talk to your doctor as soon as possible! If you have the medical approval and there’s nothing that could interfere with your treatment, choose a Tea for Gallstones that fits best your needs and enjoy its great benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Good skin is something we all want. Even if you’re a man or a woman, black heads or acne are really bothering you. If that is the case, you have definitely tried a lot of pharmaceutical and cosmetic products and nothing seemed to be working. Alternative medicine recommends a number of teas and decoctions that will make your skin smoother than ever. All you have to do is commit to this treatment and maintain an adequate skin hygiene. How Tea for Good Skin Works It’s important to know that not only acne can deteriorate your natural glow. There are also a number of affections that can stain your skin, such as liver or kidney failure, eczema or skin rash due to allergies. Smoke will age you before time, wrinkling your mouth area and your forehead. Also, you may want to change your pillow case more often, in order to keep allergens and microbes away from your face. A Tea for Good Skin’s main purpose is to clear your skin through its antiseptic ingredients and nourish the damaged areas. Efficient Tea for Good Skin When choosing a Tea for Good Skin, you need to pick the ones with the highest antifungal and antiseptic properties. You can either drink the tea or use it as a face cleanser. In case you don’t know which teas are adequate, here’s a list we made for you: - Chamomile Tea – thanks to its antibacterial and antiseptic properties, Chamomile Tea is a great help when it comes to skin treatments. Both the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic companies have included Chamomile on their must have list of ingredients. A cup of tea per day will restore your skin’s natural glow while also improving your general health. - Oolong Tea - contains half the amount of caffeine that other teas contain. You can drink it daily or use it as a compress to apply it on your affected areas. This is probably the most effective Tea for Good Skin and also the safest. If you haven’t tried it yet, now would be a good time! - Black Tea – this wonderful Tea for skin improves your vascular activity and enhances your epithelial cells production. Pay attention, though: don’t take it if you’re on your period or experiencing some menopausal pains in order to avoid complication! - White Tea – also a good nutrient, White Tea can improve your general health, not just your skin. It’s best not to combine it with other tea, though. White Tea can have a negative reaction when mixed with green tea or black tea. You can also use a decoction or White Tea tinctures in order to treat your localized injuries. Tea for Good Skin Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are perfectly safe. Just make sure you don’t exceed the number of cups recommended per day in order to avoid complications such as diarrhea or constipation. Other than that, there’s no reason not to try a face cleanser based on a Tea for Good skin! However, if you’re not sure about it yet, talk to a dermatologist or to an herbalist. Don’t take a Tea for Good Skin if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners, anticoagulants or preparing for a major surgery. If there’s nothing that could interfere with your herbal treatment, choose a Tea for Good Skin that fits you best and enjoy its wonderful benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Headaches are described as a powerful pain in the forehead area. It may be caused by a number of factors, such as noise, a powerful smell, pregnancy, stress, anxiety. Sometimes, headaches go as quickly as they come. However, when the pain is really high, you need to treat it. Since this is not a serious affection, herbalists recommend that you take a tea. How Tea for Headaches works A Tea for Headaches’ main goal is to make your body release the nutrients and enzymes necessary to make pain and stress go away. They also nourish your nervous system by stimulating your brain cells’ activity. In other words, the active constituents of these teas trigger a positive reaction from your body. No tea contains the necessary substances for your body to function one way or another. Their role is to provide your organism with enough energy to produce it itself. Efficient Tea for Headaches If you suffer from headaches, but you’re tired of traditional medicine, choose a tea that is both effective and safe and give it a try. If you don’t know which tea fits you best, here’s a list to choose from: - Green Tea – not only that it contains all the necessary substances capable to sustain life, but this particular Tea for Headaches has also a great effect on you in case you’re suffering from colds, flu, a sore throat or upset stomach. However, avoid it at all costs if you are pregnant or experiencing menstrual or menopausal pains. In high dosage, may cause miscarriage, nausea, upset stomach and vomiting. - Cinnamon Tea – is a rich in manganese, iron, fiber and calcium, making it one of the best headaches remedies. Do not drink more than 3 cups per day in order to avoid digestive tract complications, such as diarrhea, constipation or upset stomach. - Ginger Tea – nourishes your nervous system and gives your body a boost of energy. Pay attention to the amount of herb you’re using: too much can cause dried mouth, nausea and vomiting and you may experience a slight intolerance to acids foods and drinks. - Chamomile Tea – works magic on your mental and physical health. Helps out with menstrual and menopausal pains, colds, stress, anxiety and flu. It is also the safest Tea for Headaches and you can turn it into a daily habit if you’ve decided to give up coffee. Tea for Headaches Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, high dosage may lead to a number of problems such as constipation, vomiting and nausea. If you are experiencing any negative reactions, talk to your doctor as soon as possible and do not try to treat it at home! Do not take any herbal treatment without asking your doctor first in order to be informed and avoid complications. Once you have the green light, choose a Tea for Headaches that fits you best and enjoy its wonderful benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Heart conditions may be triggered by many causes, from stomach pains to vascular strokes and depression. However, some people have a congenital predisposition for cardiac problems and all they can do is treat this affection as it is. Having a heart problem could mean that your heart is not pumping enough blood (or too much), that you have an abnormal growth which weakens your circulatory system or that you suffer from arrhythmia (a disease in which your blood flow is never constant, but fluctuates depending on the situation). How a Tea for Heart Health Works A Tea for Heart Health’s main goal is to prevent diseases from developing and treating the already installed ones. If that is the case, you may want to look after teas and tinctures which contain a high level of antioxidants, natural enzymes, volatile oils and minerals (sodium, iron, magnesium and manganese) and are low on acids (in high concentrations, they may cause heartburn). Efficient Tea for Heart Health In order to work properly, a Tea for Heart Health needs to be both efficient and one hundred percent safe. Remember that you must schedule an appointment with your doctor before self medicating! This way, you’ll eliminate the risk of triggering other health problems and you’ll know for sure what’s wrong with your body. If you don’t know which teas could have a positive effect on you, here’s a list for guidance: - Green Tea – according to specialists, this Tea for Heart Health contains all the ingredients necessary to sustain life, so it’s useful for a wide range of ailments, from sore throats, headaches and migraines to infertility and erectile dysfunctions. However, you may want to avoid it if you’re experiencing menstrual and menopausal symptoms (due to its acids level, it may cause uterine contractions). - Yerba Mate Tea – named “the new green tea” by the herbalists, this decoction is a great choice for many problems, such as loss of appetite, asthenia or anemia. Although it remains yet unknown to European public, Yerba Mate Tea is very popular in South American regions. However, don’t drink more than 2 cups per day! High dosages may lead to death! - Chamomile Tea – has curative properties which are benefic for a series of health problems, from nausea, diarrhea, upset stomach to infertility and hot flashes. This Tea for Heart Health has a pleasant taste and a lovely smell. Plus, it’s one hundred percent safe, so you can drink as much as you want. If you’re thinking about giving up on coffee, Chamomile Tea can be a great replacer. Tea for Heart Health Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day may lead to a number of problems, such as stomach pain, nausea, headaches and even death. Before starting any kind of herbal treatment, make sure you’re well informed of the risks that may occur. Don’t take a Tea for Heart Health if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners or anticoagulants. The same advice if you’re preparing for a surgery. If you’ve been taking one of these teas for a while and something doesn’t feel quite right, ask for medical assistance right away! Once you have the green light from your doctor and there’s nothing that could interfere with your treatment, choose a Tea for Heart Health that fits best your condition and enjoy its great benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Heartburn or indigestion is primarily caused by the back-flow of stomach acid into the esophagus, providing a burning feeling in the chest. It seems that the symptoms of heartburn are worsened by bending over or lying down. How Tea for Heartburn works Teas for Heartburn alleviate the abovementioned symptoms. Efficient Teas for Heartburn There are some teas which proved to be efficient in treating heartburn: ginger tea , fennel seed tea, meadowsweet tea and peppermint tea . Meadowsweet is good for heartburn in two ways: by protecting the lining of the stomach and esophagus and reducing the inflammation caused by the acid. To prepare Meadowsweet tea, add 1 to 2 tablespoons of dried flowers in 1 cup of boiling water. Steep it for about 10 minutes. Strain it and drink it slowly. The tea can be taken three times a day. Peppermint is a popular herb, which is said to soothe the pain of heartburn and indigestion: it calms irritated muscles from the digestive tract and decreases the production of stomach acid. Also, it increases bile production by allowing food to pass rapidly. To prepare Peppermint tea, add 1 tablespoon of dried leaves in 1 cup of boiling water. Steep it for 15 minutes. Strain it and drink it when necessary. Tea for Heartburn: Side effects Meadowsweet tea should not be used together with blood thinners. It is advisable not to give Peppermint tea to children. Also, pregnant women should not drink this tea. Studies showed that patients with gallstones are not recommended to consume tea for heartburn. Teas for Heartburn are always good to have while going on a trip or just changing eating habits.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Your immune system consists of a series of antibodies and other microorganisms whose main purpose is to defend your system against external attacks. When we have a cold or flu, the main thing that keeps us alive is this line of defense that keeps all bacteria, infections and microbes away from us. Unfortunately, our immune system is not strong enough to fight all causes, so we need to enhance its power by taking a treatment. How a Tea for Immune System Works A Tea for Immune System must contain enough active constituents to fight a wide range of diseases. First of all, it must contain minerals, manganese, magnesium, iron, volatile oils, acids, tannins, nutrients and enzymes. These teas can be taken as cures for a short amount of time (1 or 2 weeks) to enhance your body strength, so you mustn’t exaggerate when taking it. Efficient Tea for Immune System A Tea for Immune System must contain a lot of active constituents and it must be very effective. If you don’t know which teas to choose from, here’s a list to guide you on: - Garlic Tea – can be found almost anywhere on the globe and it has a wide range of uses, from cuisine to pharmaceutical purposes. Also a great cure for diarrhea, this Tea for Immune System has a rather unpleasant taste and smell. Feel free to add honey, lemon, ginger or mint in order to make it more adequate. - Green Tea – probably the most important tea in the world, Green Tea contains all the ingredients necessary to promote a healthy life, full of great benefits. However, don’t take it in case you suffer from menstrual and menopausal pains in order to avoid stomach and uterus irritations. - Yerba Mate Tea – the South American tea has a series of health advantages and it’s been named by the scientific society “the new green tea”. Drink it from a traditional bombilla or straight from a normal glass, but make sure you know which the risks are and that you’re taking this treatment under supervision. - Ginseng Tea – this wonderful Chinese Tea is used as a main ingredient in the Asian cuisine, but also as a great adjuvant in cases of nausea, vomiting and auto-immune deficiencies. However, make sure that you’re using the right amount of herbs when preparing this decoction in order to avoid developing a acid foods and drinks intolerance! Tea for Immune System Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, drinking more tea than it’s recommended may lead to constipation, upset stomach or even death. Talk to your doctor before starting any kind of herbal treatment and find out which are the risks. Don’t take a treatment based on a Tea for Immune System if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on anti coagulants, blood thinners or preparing for a surgery. Also, children must be kept away from these teas since there’s no study to prove how safe it is for them. When in doubt, always ask your doctor. If he says there’s nothing that could interfere with your treatment, choose a tea that fits you best and enjoy its health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

In order to stay away from various types of infection, we need to make sure we strengthen our immune system. This can be done with a careful alimentation, as well as by drinking tea. Consumption of tea, a natural beverage, can help your immunity and keep away infections. Find out more about teas for infections! What do teas for infection protect us from? Infections occur when our bodies become a host for disease-causing organisms (various viruses and bacteria). Our bodies fight against these harmful organisms thanks to our immune system. Tea can be drunk in order to strengthen our immune system, which then helps us protect ourselves from various infections. However, we can also drink tea when we get an infection. The type of infection requires a specific type of tea, as well. Teas for infection In order to prevent various infections, you can drink lemon thyme tea, flax tea, yerba santa tea, linden tea, turmeric tea, rosehip tea, myrtle tea , or sencha tea. As for treating infection, the list of teas includes bayberry tea, chaparral tea, schizandra tea, psyllium tea, pipsissewa tea, and agrimony tea. Usnea tea is known for treating various types of infections. This includes infections of the digestive track (fungal infections in the mouth, stomach or intestines) and many bacterial infections. It can be applied topically too, in order to treat skin infections. Other infections can be treated with various types of tea, as well. Here is a list: - bladder infection: honeysuckle tea, boldo tea, corn silk tea, abuta tea, mullein tea; - urinary tract infections: lovage tea, cranberry tea, club moss tea, buchu tea, goldenseal tea, boldo tea, corn silk tea, vervain tea, cleavers tea, violet leaf tea, basil tea; - prostate infection: carob tea; - ear infection: calendula tea, speedwell tea, parsley tea; - respiratory infections: burdock tea, thyme tea, sarsaparilla tea, pygeum bark tea, privet tea, pleurisy root tea, osha tea, white sage tea, speedwell tea; - treat infections with fever: bupleurum tea, yarrow tea, boneset tea; - irritable bowel infection: Iceland moss tea; - nose infection: hyssop tea; - throat infection: hyssop tea; - eye infection: self-heal tea, periwinkle tea; - worm infection: boldo tea; - skin infection (applied topically): blue flag tea, Turkey rhubarb tea, black tea, ancient forest tea; - intestinal infection: yerba mate tea; - vaginal infections: witch hazel tea, echinacea tea, partridgeberry tea; - fungal infections (applied topically): bitter orange peel tea, oregon grape root tea, neem tea; - mouth infections: bistort tea, walnut bark tea, Earl Grey tea. Side effects of teas for infections Despite each tea having its own list of health benefits, teas also have a few side effects which vary from one type to another. Be careful with teas that are made from the Camellia Sinensis plant: green tea, black tea, white tea, and oolong tea. They have a pretty high caffeine content, which can lead to unwanted side effects. If you know coffee isn’t good for you, you might get headaches, nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeats, tremors, dizziness, or ringing in the ears. Pregnant and nursing women should be careful with the tea they drink, as it can affect the baby or, in case of pregnancy, lead to miscarriages. Make sure you talk with your doctor first, before you add a tea to your treatment. Also, as usnea tea is known for its benefits when it comes to infections, you should be careful with the amount you drink. Overconsumption can lead to internal bleedings, nausea and vomiting. It also shouldn’t be drunk by people who are taking blood thinners. While there are various infections in the world, there are also various teas which can prevent and treat these infections. Keep in mind both the benefits and side effects, and enjoy your tea for infections!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Inflammation is the natural way through which the human body protects itself from injurious stimuli. This way of reaction to external factors leads to a faster healing. Inflammation may be spotted due to redness, irritation, swelling and pain usually occurring internally or externally. The damage of the cells can be caused by physical impact, drugs or infections with viruses or bacteria. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are generally used to treat inflammation. How Tea for Inflammation works Tea for inflammation usually reduces the pain and swelling associated with the ailments. Efficient teas for Inflammation Studies have proven that Green tea and Chamomile tea are efficient as teas for inflammation. Green tea is one of the most popular and largely used beverages in the world, due to its benefic qualities in dealing with a large array of diseases, like cancer. Green tea is part of the products acknowledged to fight against the free radicals, responsible of spreading the cancer tumors. The antioxidants, these active ingredients from the green tea, are neutralizing the free radicals. To prepare Green tea as a tea for inflammation, add 2 tablespoons of dried plant in a cup of hot water. Steep it for 10-12 minutes. Strain it and drink it when necessary. It can also be applied topically. Chamomile tea is another good beverage in treating inflammation. Its constituents are fighting against bacteria and viruses. It has the ability to boost immunity, to relieve pain and to soothe the stomach. As a treatment against inflammation, Chamomile tea is prepared by adding 2 tablespoons of dried flowers in a cup of boiling water. Steep it for 10 minutes. Strain it and drink it when necessary. When applied topically, it is also efficient as a tea for inflammation. Tea for Inflammation: Side effects Teas for inflammation are not recommended to pregnant or nursing women. In large doses, these beverages can lead to insomnia or diarrhea. If these side effects occur, contact your doctor and ask for advice. Teas for inflammation are a good choice to treat this disease. They represent a natural way to deal with this unpleasant ailment, also fortifying the whole body.... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you have joint pains it’s best to treat them as soon as possible in order to avoid further complications, such as arthritis. Other than making your life a lot harder, joint pains may trigger other health complications such as bone cancer or even spinal cord issues. Joint problems consist of localized pain in your member and the incapacity to walk or move your hands properly. If that is the case, you better talk to a doctor before shopping for remedies, in order to find out which affection you’re dealing with. How a Tea for Joints Works A Tea for Joints’ main goal is to trigger a positive response from your body and to trick it into directing all reconstructing agents to the affected areas. These teas are well known for their curative properties, which spread from bringing relief in cases of stress, anxiety, headaches, migraines and even generalized pain. Efficient Tea for Joints In order to be efficient, a Tea for Joints needs to be one hundred percent safe (you may want to avoid other health complications) and to have a quick and positive effect on your body. To be able to do that, a Tea for Joints has to contain an elevated level of nutrients, enzymes, volatile oils and minerals (iron, sodium, magnesium and manganese). If you don’t know which teas contain all the necessary constituents, here’s a list to choose from: - Green Tea – can induce a state of calmness to both your articulations and bone system thanks to its substances. Scientists have shown that this Tea for Joints contains all the necessary ingredients that could sustain life, so you must have it in your medicine cabinet. However, if you’re experiencing menstrual or menopausal symptoms, it’s best to avoid it at all costs: it may cause uterine contractions. - Chamomile Tea – has soothing properties and it’s also good for a wide range of health complaints, from headaches to sore throats and even diabetes. It has a pleasant taste and a lovely smell. Not only that, but this tea is also one hundred percent safe, so you can drink as much as you want. - Raspberry Leaf Tea – contains a high level of vitamin C, which will enhance your health and give you an energy boost. You can also use it for female reproductive problems, such as infertility or even menopause. Two cups of Raspberry Leaf Tea per day might work miracles on your health! Tea for Joints Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups may lead to a number of affections, such as upset stomach, skin rash, diarrhea and nausea. If you’ve been taking one of these teas for a while and you’re experiencing some unusual reactions, ask for medical assistance immediately. Don’t take a Tea for Joints if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners or anticoagulants. The same advice if you’re preparing for a surgery (some of the active constituents might interfere with your anesthetic). But if you have the green light from your doctor, choose a Tea for Joints that fits best your needs and enjoy its great health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Consumption of tea can lead to many health benefits, as it is a natural beverage. There are various types of tea which help with kidney problems, as well. Find out more about teas for kidney! Why drink tea for kidney Damage of kidney (nephropathy) can lead to various problems. Some of the more common ones include kidney failure (also known as renal failure), kidney tumors (Wilms tumor or renal cell carcinoma), and kidney stones. Consumption of tea can help treat these problems, prevent them or slow down their progress. They also help maintain the kidneys in a healthy condition, which leads to other health benefits, such as regulating the blood pressure. Teas for kidney There are several types of tea which help with kidney problems. Most of them are herbal teas. Club moss tea, elderberry tea, saw palmetto tea, and cleavers tea have a cleansing effect, helping with the detoxification process. In the case of kidney failures, you can add centaury tea and Ceylon tea to your treatment. For other kidney problems, as well as the ones mentioned before, drink fenugreek tea, burdock tea, sassafras tea, banaba tea, sage tea, juniper tea, privet tea, orris tea, or milk thistle tea. Also, in order to have a pair of healthy kidneys, you can drink cranberry tea, goji tea, rehmannia tea, dandelion tea, lemongrass tea, or kukicha tea. Tea for kidney stones Kidney stones are some of the most common kidney problems. They are solid concretions or crystal aggregations which are formed in the kidneys and eliminated through urine. Black tea is one type of tea that can help with kidney stones. Other teas, herbal ones this time, are butterbur tea, corn silk tea, uva ursi tea, stone root tea, triphala tea, marshmallow tea, alfalfa tea, pipsissewa tea, and abuta tea. Tea for kidney side effects Side effects vary from one tea to another. Generally, it is recommended to speak to your doctor first, before consuming one of these teas, if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Also, you have to be careful with black tea, which has a pretty high caffeine content. If your body can’t take caffeine, it might lead to unwanted side effects: headaches, nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeats, tremors, dizziness, or ringing in the ears. Teas you shouldn’t drink If you’ve got kidney problems, there are a few types of tea you should not drink. The list includes oolong tea, horse chestnut tea, lovage tea, wu yi tea, lemon verbena tea, rue tea, and periwinkle tea. Also, you might get kidney problems (even kidney stones) if you drink a high amount of boneset tea, yohimbe tea, yerba mate tea, essiac tea, parsley tea, osha tea, and meadowsweet tea. However, juniper tea and horsetail tea are part of a special class. They both help with kidney problems, but they have to be consumed properly. Over consumption can lead to kidney pains in the case of juniper tea, or kidney stones in the case of horsetail tea. You can protect your kidney, as well as treat various kidney problems, by drinking tea. Besides this, you’ll discover that, based on the type of tea you drink, you’ll get plenty of health benefits, as well. Have a cup of tea for kidney!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

If you’re experiencing abdominal pain and you’re sure it’s not a digestive tract ailment, it’s very possible that you’re suffering from a kidney disorder. The same if the pain is localized in the back or on one side of your body. Usually, kidney problems appear when there’s something wrong with your urinary tract and not only. Overexposing your body to low temperatures may cause urinary infections, impurity accumulations lead to kidney stones. Also, kidney problems can be caused by other health complaints, such as pulmonary edema and cancers. However, it’s best to schedule an appointment with your doctor in order to find out what’s actually going on with your body. How a Tea for Kidney Problems Works A Tea for Kidney Problems’ main goal is to purify your body by triggering a positive response from it. Once the main substances of these teas reach the affected areas, your organism produces enough endorphins (which are cells specialized in making you feel a lot better by bringing relief to your wounds) and antibodies to reconstruct the damaged tissue. Efficient Tea for Kidney Problems In order to work properly, a Tea for Kidney Problems needs to be both efficient and one hundred percent safe. Also, it must contain the right amount of nutrients, natural enzymes, volatile oils, antioxidants and minerals (sodium, magnesium, iron and manganese). This way, that tea will make your body eliminate the unwanted impurities and improve your kidney function. If you don’t know which teas would be appropriate for your condition, here’s a list to choose from: - Dandelion Tea – can be prepared from dandelion roots and it’s also a great adjuvant in diarrhea and urinary infection cases. This Tea for Kidney Problems has a bitter taste, but you can add ginger, lemon, mint or honey in order to make it more adequate for you. Avoid it at all costs if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding: due to its strong purgative and diuretic properties, Dandelion Tea can cause uterine contractions which may lead to miscarriages. - Marshmallow Root Tea – this lovely tea with a hint of Christmas is useful for a large variety of problems, from infertility to gastrointestinal and digestive complaints. Take a sip at every 5 minutes for an hour and enjoy the wonderful health benefits! - Buchu Tea – contains antioxidants and antibacterial agents, being a great help in cases of cystitis, urethritis and kidney failure. This Tea for Kidney acts like a natural diuretic and should not be taken by pregnant women. - Green Tea – as the scientists have proved, this decoction contains all the ingredients necessary to sustain life, so it’s useful for many problems, not just kidney disorders. However, don’t take it if you’re experiencing menstrual and menopausal symptoms (it can cause uterine contractions and stomach acidity). Tea for Kidney Problems Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day might lead to a number of health problems such as miscarriages, hallucinations, headaches and skin rash. If you’ve been taking one of these teas and something doesn’t feel quite right, talk to your doctor as soon as possible. Don’t take a Tea for Kidney Problems if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners or anticoagulants. The same advice if you’re preparing for a surgery. If you have the medical approval and there’s nothing that could interfere with your treatment, choose a Tea for Kidney problems that fits best your needs and give it a try today!  ... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Having a lucid dream means dreaming while being aware of the fact that you are dreaming. However, many people become lucid in the middle of the dream or, on the contrary, fall lose reality contact after being lucid at first. Although traditional medicine can’t be very helpful in these cases, alternative medicine has a few tricks up its sleeve. How a Tea for Lucid Dreams Works A Tea for Lucid Dreams’ main purpose is to make you recall what you have dreamed by calming your nervous system and improving your memory function. These teas are good for a number of other diseases, such as memory loss, headaches or migraines. However, talk to an herbalist or to your doctor before starting any kind of herbal treatment in order to make sure everything will be alright. Efficient Tea for Lucid Dreams In order to work properly, a Tea for Lucid Dreams needs to be both very efficient and one hundred percent safe (since lucid dreams are not exactly a medical problem, you may want to avoid developing one). A tea that is rich in antioxidants, nutrients, tannins, volatile oils and minerals (sodium, magnesium, iron, manganese) would be very adequate. You may want to avoid teas with a large amount of acid agents (they could cause stomach pain). If you don’t know which teas could be useful for lucid dreams, here’s a list for guidance: - Green Tea – contains all the ingredients necessary to sustain life, so it’s useful for a wide range of ailments, not just lucid dreams. If you’re suffering from infertility, anemia, asthenia, loss of appetite, digestive tract complaints or nervous system failure, this decoction could also be useful. However, you must avoid it at all costs if you’re experiencing some menstrual or menopausal symptoms. The same advice if you’re pregnant (it may cause uterine contractions and therefore miscarriage). - Valerian Tea – was been used as a sleep aid since ancient times, when the Romans and the Greeks took it before going to bed. This Tea for Lucid Dreams, thanks to its active compounds, is a mild sedative and could also work miracles on your nervous system. However, you need to make sure that you don’t exceed the number of cups recommended per day in order to avoid hallucinations, tiredness or even death. - Chamomile Tea – of course, the world’s greatest panacea shouldn’t be left aside. If you’re having trouble remembering your dreams, try a cup of Chamomile Tea before you go to bed! This Tea has a great fragrance and a pleasant smell. Plus, it’s one hundred percent safe so you can drink as much as you want. Tea for Lucid Dreams Side Effects When taken according to specifications, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day may lead to a number of health problems, such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, upset stomach or even death! If you’ve been taking one of these decoctions for a while and you’re experience a negative response from your body, ask for medical assistance right away! Don’t take a Tea for Lucid Dreams if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners or anticoagulants. The same advice in case you’re preparing for a surgery. If your doctor says it’s ok to start an herbal treatment, choose a tea that fits best your requirements and enjoy its wonderful benefits!  ... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Lung affections consist of mucus accumulations, water retention, upper chest inflammations and other problems of the respiratory system. If you have trouble breathing, you feel a back pain or it seems like there’s something pressing on your chest, it’s possible that you have a lung problem. However, schedule an appointment with your doctor to find out which disease you suffer from. How a Tea for Lungs Works A Tea for Lungs’ main goal is to clear out all the unwanted accumulations and improve your respiration. Many other diseases are linked to lungs affections, such as heart conditions (low or increased blood pressure, arrhythmia, cardiovascular problems). A Tea for Lungs can treat your localized affections and not only: a tea rich in enzymes and tannins will also improve your heartbeat and blood pressure. Efficient Tea for Lungs In order to be effective, a Tea for Lungs needs to be both one hundred percent safe and contain the right amount of active constituents. You may not know this, but their proportion determines which tea is good for which affection, so not any tea found in the kitchen can treat your lung problems. If you don’t know which teas to choose from, here’s a list to guide you on: - Elecampane Tea – the main active constituents are mucilage, essential oils and a substance called camphor, which is a natural antibiotic with expectorant action. This tea can flush out of your system all infection triggers and reduce inflammation while calming the affected areas. However, you may want to talk to your doctor before starting a treatment based on this Tea for Lungs. - Hawthorn Tea – good for a number of affections, such as pleurisy, pulmonary edema or even mild cancer cases, this tea contains an important level of flavonoids and procyanidis which can treat your arrhythmia and stabilize your blood pressure. Don’t drink more than two cups per day for a short amount of time (one or two weeks) in order to avoid further complications. - Thyme Tea – contains thymol, which is a powerful antibiotic and polymethoxyflavones which have anti-coughing and anti-inflammatory properties. Thanks to its great expectorant properties, this Tea for Lungs is recommended by practitioners around the world as a great bronchitis treatment. Tea for Lungs Side Effects When taken according to medical specifications, these teas are one hundred percent safe. However, talk to your doctor before starting any kind of medical treatment and remember that self medication may cause even more damages. Don’t take any of these teas if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on anti-coagulants or blood thinners. The same advice for patients who are preparing for a surgery: these teas contain substances that may interfere with the anesthetic. If you have the green light from your doctor, choose a Tea for Lungs that fits you best and enjoy its wonderful health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Meditation is not something that your doctor can induce since this is not a medical problem. However, even if meditation has nothing to do with your physical status, there are a couple of remedies recommended by the alternative medicine. Some teas have the ability to enhance your respiration, concentration and decrease your blood pressure, which will definitely help you meditate a lot better. These teas could have a great effect on your entire health system by making your body release endorphins. However, you must keep in mind the fact that this is a medical treatment and it shouldn’t be used unsupervised. How a Tea for Meditation Works A Tea for Meditation’s main goal is to cleanse your respiratory system and improve your coronary system’s functions. In order to do that, a tea for Meditation needs to contain an important amount of volatile oils, nutrients, enzymes and minerals, such as manganese, magnesium and iron. This way, you’ll be able to loosen up and concentrate on your mental exercises. These teas have the ability to induce a state of calmness and nourish your nervous system so no headaches or migraines would interfere with your meditation. Efficient Tea for Meditation In order to be efficient, a Tea for Meditation must be one hundred percent safe and show results quickly (it’s understandable, considering the fact that you will take the decoction within minutes before meditation). If you don’t know which teas to choose from, here’s a list to guide you on: - Green Tea – contains all the ingredients necessary to sustain life, according to specialists and it can treat a wide range of affections, from headaches, sore throats to infertility and even diabetes. Also, you may want to give it a try if you suffer from hangovers. However, avoid this Tea for Meditation at all costs if you’re experiencing menstrual or menopausal symptoms (due to a high acids level, Green Tea may cause uterine contractions). - Oolong Tea – has half the amount of caffeine that other teas have and it’s recommended for many affections, such as infertility and sore throats. And if you’re thinking about giving up on coffee, Oolong Tea could be e great replacer. Oolong Tea will treat your stress accumulations and calm the affected areas. - Pu’er Tea – is not very popular among Europeans, but its wonderful benefits should not be left aside. If you find a provider specialized in Pu’er Tea, hold on to it because this decoction can treat nausea, stomach pain and even indigestion. Take a sip or two of Pu’er Tea before meditation and enjoy the great benefits that this tea has in store for you! Tea for Meditation Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day might lead to a series of health problems, such as skin rash, vomiting, nausea and diarrhea. If you’ve been taking one of these teas for a while and you’re experiencing some unusual reactions, ask for medical assistance immediately. Don’t take a Tea for Meditation if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners or anticoagulants.The same advice if you’re preparing for a surgery (some of the active constituents in these teas could interfere with your anesthetic). Once you have the green light from your doctor and there’s nothing that could interfere with your treatment, choose a Tea for Meditation that fits best your needs and enjoy its health benefits at home!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Morning Sickness is not particularly a disease, but a symptom of pregnancy. If you feel that the room is spinning around and that all scents are too strong, it is possible that you’re pregnant. However, morning sickness usually consists of vomiting, nausea, headaches, back pains and, at times, fever. This affection looks a lot like food intoxication. But just to be sure, schedule an appointment with your gynecologist. How Tea for Morning Sickness Works A Tea for Morning Sickness’ main goal is to ameliorate your weakness and restore your general health. Thanks to the active ingredients in these teas, your abdominal muscles will stop their negative response, while nourishing the nervous system. Also, morning sickness has a lot to do with your hormones, so you may want to try a tea with an elevated estrogen level or at least one that could stop your hormone level from growing. Efficient Tea for Morning Sickness In order to be efficient, a Tea for Morning Sickness needs to have the right amount of nutrients, enzymes, volatile oils and minerals (a tea rich in manganese, iron, magnesium is the best choice for your condition). You may want to avoid the ones with a high acids level, since they cause stomach acidity and, at times, even uterine contractions which might lead to miscarriage. If you don’t know which teas are best for your problem, here’s a list to help you out: - Peppermint Tea – this Tea for Morning Sickness is well known as a stomach soothing decoction, with various uses which spread on many areas of interest, from cosmetic industry to pharmaceutical remedies. This tea could lower your hormone level and induce a state of calmness to your abdominal area. You can also use it to treat diarrhea, sore throats, nausea and even headaches. Peppermint Tea is one hundred percent safe and you can take as much as you want. - Ginger Tea – although Ginger Tea is a great nausea reliever, practitioners around the world are concerned when it comes to administrating it to pregnant women. Even if this Tea for Morning Sickness is very efficient for nausea, using too much herb will cause uterine contractions due to its acid compounds. The best thing you can do is ask your doctor’s advice before taking this tea. - Raspberry Leaf Tea – also a great remedy for infertility, anemia, asthenia and other problems, this tea has a sweet taste and a pleasant smell. Practitioners around the world have discovered that this Tea for Morning Sickness could take your pain away in no time thanks to its active constituents, which include tannins, manganese and iron. And let’s not forget the vitamin C, which will energize your entire body. Tea for Morning Sickness Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day may lead to other affection such as constipation, migraines or stomach irritations. Talk to an herbalist or to your doctor before starting any kind of herbal treatment and make sure that everything will be ok. However, if you’ve been taking one of these teas and you’re noticing some unusual responses from your body, ask for medical assistance immediately! If you have the medical approval and there’s nothing that could interfere with your treatment, choose a Tea for Morning Sickness that fits best your needs and give it a try!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

Nerve damage can include neuropathy or neuritis, which can be caused by diabetes, nerve injury, autoimmune disease, viral infections, muscle spasms or vitamin deficiencies. Traditional medicine found a lot of treatments for nerve damage, but alternative medicine fans think that you don’t need to take a lot of pills for something that can be treated with just a cup of tea. How a Tea for Nerves Works A Tea for Nerves’ main purpose is to nourish your nervous system and induce a state of relaxation to all your nervous cells. Also, these teas can reconstruct the damaged tissue and make your body heal all affected areas. In order to be useful, a Tea for Nerves needs to contain tannins, volatile oils and minerals (manganese, magnesium, iron, preferably). Efficient Tea for Nerves When choosing a Tea for Nerves, remember that it must be both one hundred percent safe and very efficient. If you don’t know which teas to choose from, here’s a list to help you out: - Saint John’s Wort Tea – is useful for sciatica and it can bring relief to patients suffering from depression and spinal nerves damages. Take only a cup per day and avoid it at all costs if you’re on antidepressants. Also, if you’re pregnant, talk to your doctor before starting a treatment based on Saint John’s Wort Tea. - Skullcap Tea – treats a number of affections such as inflammation, arteriosclerosis, high cholesterol and epilepsy thanks to its active constituents: antioxidant flavonoids, which can repair the nervous damages and baicalin (has anti-spastic and nerve-relaxant properties). Don’t take more than 2 cups per day for a short amount of time and don’t combine it with anti-depressants and sedatives. Basil Tea – this Tea for Nerves has many medical uses and not only that it can repair the nervous ailments, but it’s also a great energy and health enhancer. You can also use it to treat asthenia, anemia, loss of appetite and digestive tract problems. Drink one or two cups per day for a short amount of time and enjoy the health benefits! Tea for Nerves Side Effects When taken properly, these teas are generally safe. However, make sure you don’t exceed the number of cups recommended per day or you’ll get diarrhea, constipation, nausea, headaches or skin rashes. If you’ve been taking one of these teas for a while and you’re experiencing some unusual reactions, talk to your doctor as soon as possible! Don’t take a Tea for Nerves if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners, anticoagulants or preparing for a major surgery (these teas contains substances that may interfere with your anesthetic). The same advice for children: there are no studies to examine the treatment’s effect on them. If your doctor says it’s ok to try a Tea for Nerves, choose one that fits best your needs and enjoy its wonderful health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

The nervous system is responsible for almost any reaction that comes from your body. From eyes to muscles and even hair, your body is a very complex electric system directed by your brain. Most of the problems that a person has in a lifetime are related to a nervous system failure. In order to treat this kind of problems or prevent them from happening, you may want to try a tea instead of all those traditional pills. How a Tea for Nervous System Works A Tea for Nervous System is indeed helpful if it contains an important amount of nutrients, enzymes, tannins, volatile oils and minerals (sodium, iron, magnesium and manganese). You may want to avoid a tea that has an elevated acids level since it may cause you even more damages. A Tea for Nervous System will make your body send all the active constituents to the affected areas and heal the damaged tissue. Efficient Tea for Nervous System In order to work properly, a Tea for Nervous System must show results in a short time period and be one hundred percent safe (you don’t want any more complications than you already have). However, before starting any kind of herbal treatment, remember to take the indicated dose and never surpass it in order to avoid other health problems. If you don’t know which teas could be helpful for you, here’s a list for guidance: - Oolong Tea – contains half the amount of caffeine that other teas have so it’s best for your health to give it a try every once in a while. This Tea for Nervous System will also strengthen your entire organism and rejuvenate the aspect of your skin. However, don’t drink more than 2 cups per day. - Green Tea – as the scientists have proved, this decoction contains all the ingredients necessary to sustain life, so it’s good for a number of other health complaints, such as infertility, headaches, nausea, loss of appetite, anemia and asthenia. Just make sure you avoid it at all costs in case you’re experiencing some menstrual or menopausal symptoms (it may cause uterine contractions and internal bleedings). - Black Tea – some say that it does more damages than good for your nervous system and some others think that this tea is worth a try. Having an elevated level of caffeine, this tea is highly addictive. In right amount, it can treat infertility, erectile dysfunctions, sore throats and colds. However, ask an herbalist before starting a treatment based on this Tea for Nervous System in order to find out which are the risks. Tea for Nervous System Side Effects When taken according to specifications, these teas are generally safe. However, exceeding the number of cups recommended per day may lead to other health complaints, such as nausea, diarrhea, uterine contractions, internal bleedings and headaches. If you’ve tried one of these teas and something doesn’t feel quite right, talk to your doctor as soon as possible! Don’t take a Tea for Nervous System if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, on blood thinners or anticoagulants. The same advice if you’re preparing for a surgery (some of the active compounds in these teas may interfere with your anesthetic and cause death). But if you have the green light from your doctor, choose a tea that fits best your requirements and enjoy its wonderful health benefits!... Beneficial Teas

Beneficial Teas

The decision to quit smoking if rarely strong enough to actually put a stop to this addiction. However, if you are determined and feel that this would be a good day to stop smoking, you may want to try an herbal remedy before rushing off to the pharmacy. Many people are concerned about the fact that quitting smoking will make them gain weight. That’s only partially true. Since smoking is more a social habit, some people feel the need to replace cigarettes with something else and they usually choose food. That’s why you might gain a few pounds. However, there are a number of teas capable of inhibiting this reaction, so do not despair! How a Tea for Quitting Smoking Works A <